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VoJ. XXXXIII 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER, 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THUfiSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1918. 



$1.50 Per \ear 



No 15 



NEED OF DOCTORS. 
The demand for doctors has been 
wkthsot precedent, both for military 
sod civilian purposes. It will at once 
be Been that this demand must he 
ailed unless the public heulth Is to 
suffer. This would be regrettable 
at all times. It is Impossible In 
time of war. There can be no deplet- 
ed jonks in a population menaced nu- 
merically by deaths at the front. The 
rast amount of research work to be un- 
dertaken to combat unknown condi- 
tions dependent on lack of nourish- 
ment and war conditions at the front 
demand specialists to devote all their 
time to such work, says Milwaukee 
News. The field of the general prac- 
titioner will be open to candldutes as 
It has not been for many years. It Is 
hoped that entrance to the medical 
school will be regarded as a way of 
doing his bit by the young man who 
- baa not determined on any line of 
study for a future profession. Disease 
and casualty are responsible for a se- 
rious deficit in the ranks of the trained 
man at present. His place must be 
filled. And the European need of sur- 
geons will offer work for many years 
to come. 



To bring about economy In their use 
the Swedish government has requisi- 
tioned, by royal decree, the supplies 
of wheat, rye, barley, oats, mixed 
grain, vetches, peas, beans, and sugar 
beets within the kingdom. The Amer- 
ican minister, Ira N. Morris, has noti- 
fied the department of commerce from 
Stockholm that the order In question 
applies to all stocks from a previous 
harvest that were available on Sep- 
tember 1, and to the current harvest* 
as soon as cut. The decree remains 
la force until April '3p next. Mr. Mor- 
ris also has Informed tin* department 
that the Swedish government hn.s ta- 
ken over all supplies of fodder in that 
country. About thlrty-flve different ar- 
ticles come under the head of "fodder" 
there, Including whale meal. 



You may not be at>le to Influence the 
souring prices, but you can refrain 
from boosting them. Each little ad- 
vance demands another. You will have_ 
to be careful If the increase In pay Is 
not more thun eaten up in paying for 
the Increased desires that are sure to 
assert themselves. It's easier to' get 
ahead by saving from the income than 
it is to increase the Income. It's no 
easy task to add to your production 
when all along you have been lolng 
your best. So do what you can. 
I Watch the outgo, cut down general ex- 
pense and lay by a little from the In- 
come. It will be handy when you get 
old. 



Tl»e ambition to many a bright 
young American is to be a military av- 
iator, yet the supply will have to be 
very large to meet the demand. Sixty 
thousand machines are building for the 
war department. Aviators will 'be 
needed in great numbers. It is dan- 
gerous work, but so Is other military 
service. The aviator's chance of rec- 
ognition for meritorious achievement 
is greater than that in the trenches. 



Showers of blessing may come to 
the country through the revival of 
knitting; Remember grandmother, she^ 
iOf the nimble lingers? As the sock 
•lengthened with the speed of an after- 
noon shadow her soul seemed to reacli 
the heights of sublime calm. She did 
more than knit— she created a beau- 
tiful atmosphere, full of love, compas- 
sion and sweet charity. 



Men In the army cantonments are 
to be glveu a rating, according to In- 
telligence through psychological exam- 
inations. Exponents of democracy 
ought to warmly approve, for In civil 
lite more often than not the rating 
which a man receives is based on 
what he has In his pockets rather than 
lu his howl. 

» ■ 

Patieuce eventually earns its reward, 
The poor, misunderstood, despised 
snake, regarded and treated as an en- 
emy of mankind for sixty centuries, 
Is now to hi- welcomed us the 'farmer's 
friend. Somebody, perhaps, the cheap 
demagogue may appear oven in a no- 
bler light thun we beheld him now. 

A Dutch commissioner says he hopes 
Mie Americans will upprei into the tact 

thai Holland If between the devil and 
the deep sou. ism thai is no reason 
why America Miinui.i be content to w 

on anil let thi in help iho devil's wui'L. 
i'ii the son. 



STATE'S REVENUES 

Will be Greatly Increased Accor- 
ding to Report of State Tax 
Commission on the As- 
sessments Indicated 

With Economy the State Debt 

Can Be Paid Off in Three 

or Four Years. 



Frankfort, Dec. 31st, -The long 
waited and important report of 
tho Kentucky State **- ^—j^s- 
Bion, covering; the results of the 
first assessment inder Kentucky's 
row tax law and estimating the 
probable revenue of the State un- 
der that law, has been prepared 
by the board for Gov. Stanley ana 
member of the legislature. 

Not in many years has any pub- 
lic document been waited with as 
keen interest, because the whole 
financial future of the Btate has 
been believed to depend largely 
upon the showing made in thisre- 
gard to the money that would oe 
raised under the new tax law ana 
the chances of paying the State 
out of debt thy its application. 
In the report the maximum ana 
minimum estimates are given, ana 
the next legislature will know 
from this report the maximum rev 
nue, should assessments finally 
fall to a total given by the com- 
mission as the lowest to be ex- 
pected with any reasonable prob- 
ability. 

Tho Tax Commission informs the 
Governor and the legislature that, 
under the law and the assessment 
the increase in tho assessment, the 
increase in the revenue of the State 
during 1918 over 1917 will be at 
least $1, 543,000. The maximum pos 
sible for the first year 15 $2,343,000. 
Win lie it is possijblo that the fi- 
nal assessment in the counties will 
show a not increase in revenue to 
the State of somewhere between 
$1,500,000 and $2,343,000 the total of 
$1,543,000 is considered absolutely 
assured. The hot increase may be 
larger ; it will not jio-lsiblv be 
smaller. 

The State of Kentucky is now in 
debt to tho extent of about $3,- 
500,000, and this is a floating -debt, 
and, therefore very embarrassing 
to tho State. The State expended 
in 1917 almost exactly $600,000 in 
excess of of its revenue!. It will 
thus be seen that, ainder the min- 
imum estimate, tho State of Ken- 
kcjitucky, provided there in no in- 
crease in appropriations by the 
next legislature, will have a reve 
nue in 1918 of at least $900,000 in 
excess of expenditures. , The ex- 
cess may be as muth as $1,500,000 
Using the minimum figure, how- 
ever, it can be peen that, under 
the new tax system, the State can 
meet all its expenses ancf reduce 
the floating debt l almo3t $1,000,- 
000 in the first year, and can.asr- 
suming that assessments wi'l sure- 
ly increase, pay the State out of 
debt in three or four yearB. ' 
of this, however, is entirely 
pendent upon (economy In- 
coming legislature. 



Get Ready for the Big Drive. 

This coming year the American 
farmer, every American farmer, is 
going to be palled on to do more 
than ho has ever done. Last spring 
it seemed that as if all the worlu 
all at once grew busy telling the 
farmers what to do and how much 
of it, but this next spring still 
greater demands aro going to be 
made of them. There may not be 
so much noise made, but the de- 
mand is going to bo even more 
insistent. 

The war may be won by this time 
next year. It now Bcems rather 
likely thet it may go on until 1919. 
Whether it is won quickly or only 
after a long struggle, it must 
be won, and to win it the farmer? 
must do even more this year than 
they did last. 

More grain, more meat, more 
cotton, more- staple food products 
of almost every kind than were 
produced last year will almost cer- 
tainly be needed this year. They 
will gave to be produced, too, 
by fewer men. While it will 
doubtless- be— the policy of the 
government to leave just as many 
as possible on the farms, it is 
sheer folly to think for a minute 
that hundreds of thousands of the 
most able and useful young darm- 
ers will not be ailed into the ar- 
my. It is unavoidable that this be 
done. Other industries must be 
kept going, and every one of our 
groat industries is going to do as 
or more work with fewer men. 

This can be done. It can be done 
elsewhere and it can be done on 
the farm. But the farmer who'o 
do his part of it must begin light 
now to get ready for it. Increased 
production another year is not go 
ing to be merely a case of i ty- 
ing to be merely a case of in- 
creased acreage. It is not going 
to be simply a case of harder 
work or longer hours on the part 
of the farmer. The fact is, a great 
many farmers work too lard anci 
too long hours as it is, especial- 
ly during tho crop making season. 
What is needed in something far 
different. Jt is better planning, 
butter preparation, m-jie thought 
for every branch of the farm work 
from the breaking of the ground 
to the- marketing of the product. 



DOING WELL IN THE WEST 

Bluford W. Aylor Haa Made 

Good in the Cattle Business 

and is Recognized as a 

Leading Breeder. 

He Paid the Highest Price Ever 

Paid in America For a 

Cow and Calf. 



Bluford Aylor, of Granden, N. 
Dakota, was a caller at this of-: 
fice durinz the holidays. Eighteen 
*««*, _£o'ne started out to seek 
his fortune and located in the 
Northwest, where he experiencea 
many a hard knock before he 
succeeded in establishing him- 
self, but, at last., as is the case 
with those who persevere, he sue 
eeeded, and is now on easy street, 
and enjoys the distinction of be- 
ing one of the largest and most 
successful breeders of beef cattle 
in the great northwest, which 
statement is corroborated by the 
frequent reference to him in that 
connection by the large livestock 
journals in that part of the coun- 
try. At a recent sale attended 
by Mr. Aylor he ran a fine bull 
up to nearly five thousand dol- 
lars for which amount the animal 
was knocked off to another bld- 
ber- At the same sale he bought 
a cow and calf for $4,800, a bull 
for $2,000 and a heifer for $1,000. 
A barl>eeue given by him the past 
year was attended by 3,000 peo- 
ple, and that day ho sold at auc- 
tion 40 head of cattle at an aver- 
age of $375. Mr Aylor had with 
him photographs of his 610 acre 
ranch, which show that ha is ad- 
mirably equipped for the business 
in which no is engaged and has 
a beautiful home, while the pic- 
ture* of a portion of his fine 



Want More Sheep, Lees Dogs. 



B. T. Kelly Beholds a Strange 
Sight in the Northeast— Sev- 
eral Others Also Saw It. 



Warren M. Meek, of Floyd coun- 
ty, is urging farmers to write 
their Senators and Representa- 
tives, who are to assemble next 
month at Frankfort, "to enact a 
law that will make it possible to 
produce more sheep in Ky." 

His appeal is in the nature sup- 
portive of the arguments made by 
Representative-elect Arch L. Ham 
ilton, of Fayette county, who has 
announced he will offer an amend 
ment to the dog "law to the eoa 
that there shall be more sheep 
and fewer dogs, and more money 
with which to reimburse fanners 
for the sheep killed by dogs. 

"The one great hindrance to sue 
cessful sheep raising In Ken- 
tucky," says Farmer Meek, "is the 
worthless dog. Until the law is 
changed and better protection af- 
forded the farmer against ' the 

ravages of the worthless dog, w*ftV^ B "lftr7Kelly"*stood 
cannot hop© for a material 



WHAT IS IT? 



increase in sheep production in 
this state. 

"In 1860 we had 939,000 sheep in 
Kentucky and a population of 1,- 
055,684, while far ldifr we faachonty 
411,000 sheep and a population 
double ' that of 1860. The need of 
more sheep— more meat and more 
wool— never wsb more keenly felt. 

"There is a great shortage of 
hogs in Kentucky, due in part 
to the high oost of feed, yet We 
could raise and fatten for the 
butcher 50,000 head of hogs with 
the feed that is wasted on worth- 
less dogs. 

"Very recently the Henry coun- 
ty Fiscal Court allowed claims to 
farmers totaling $650 for sheep 
killed by dogs. Thousands of dol 
lars ars paid annually in this way 
and thousands of dollars worth of 
good meat and good wool go the 
dog route. There are thousands of 
acres of land all over Kentucky 
suited to no other purpose than 
sheep grazing, but this waste 
land cannot be utilized because 
of a multiplicity of worthless 
dogs. 

"Hundreds of farmer* hpp-imw 



SOME COLD. 

Sunday morning, December 30th, 
was some cold again in this im- 
mediate locality. At W L. Kirk- 
, patrick's* and G. O Hushes/ In** 
herd of cattle indicates ho is a sue or this ar» made land poor. Ken- east of .own the mercury mark- 
cessful breeder of that class of tucky farmers are anxious to heed e d 18 degrees below z«ero, while 



About five o'clock one morning 
some ten days ago, B. T Kelly, 
who resides two miles out on the 
East Rend road, witnessed a very 
beautiful scene in the northwest 
sky, which he describes as a col- 
lection of red and light stripes 
alternating, and extending to- 
ward the zenith from a point 
considerably above the horizon. 
Through tho light stripes the 
stars could b» seel? distinctly. 
The stripes disappeared gradual- 

and be- 
held them. Othere witnessed the 
same sight, and it was talked 
about over the telephone by some 
of his neighbors. Mr. Kelly was 
disappointed in not seeing some 
account of the strange sight in 
the daily press, as it was seen 
by several out in his neighbor- 
hood, and he aupposed many eth- 
ers in other localities had 
ed-it. 



view- 



BTJYING FINE LAND. 

J. R Respess, Of Florence, was 
in Burlington, ono day last week, 
having examined the title to 60 
of the David Buffington farm 
above Florence, he having pur- 
chased that much of the farm at 
$60 per acre. Mr, Respess is now 
owner of the finest farm on the 
Lexington pike in this county, anal 
is having it put in the best condi- 
tion for a farm on which to breed 
race horses. 



stock. Tho breeders' Gazette, pub 
liehed at Chicago, carried an ac- 
count of the sale at which Mr. 
Aylor bought the $4,800, which is 



A1K 
de- 
ths> 



Any wast of fertility now-- i sai( i to bo the highest prieeev- 

hurning of cr paid in America for a cow 



waste of i;he manurt 
vegetation, neglect of land, mis- 
handling of fertilisers,— is a less- 
ening of the nation's strength. 
Any waste of food or foodstuffs is 
a crime against the country. Tn j 
lea ve t he m ac hinery o ut ot doors 



and her calf. 



FORTY YEARS AGO TODAY 



or to throw asid? any that might ! «. ■*• i r? .1 i r 

be useful is to make harder the | Item » Taken From the Is * u e of 

The Recorder of Janua- 
ry 10th, 1878; 



BIG PURCHASE OP LAND. 

'Tho big holiday real estate- deal 
in this pari: of th> county was 
completed last week when Courl- 
ooy and Hubert Walton convoyed 
to Tun Rich 250 acres of land on 
Ashby Fork creek, a part of the 
real estate owned bv their father, 
tho late *N. S, Walton. There is 
considerable good tobacco land 
in th e tract-c onv eyed to Mr. Rich 
and he being one of the most 
successful tobacco g ra wcr s In the 
county will make his new posses- 
sion turn in a handsome revenue 
from that source. It is under- 
stood that ono of Mr. Rich's sons 
will occupy tho farm, and he is 
a chip off of tho old block when 
it comes to raising tobacco. The 
old gentleman resides in Big Bone 
church neighborhood. being the 
owner of the farm known as the 
Elza Garrison farm. 



task laid upon all. This year the 
farmers must pay more attention 
than ever before v:j whatever will 
make for the productivity of their 
forlds ; they must depend more 
than ever before upon machinery 
to help them work ; they must 
uso more care than ever before to 
see that what is produced on their 
farms is delivered to the consum 
er without loss and without un- 
due cost. All these things are mat 
ters for thought, and thought is 
going to count, as it always has 
counted, for more than mere phys 
ical exertion. 

The government has made clear 
its purpose to see that the farmer 
gets a fair return for his labor. 
It is evidently going to take a 
j more active interest than ever be- 
before in the distribution of his 
products. This will benefit both 
him and the man who finally pays 
for thorn. He is called upon to try 
his best as an individual and as a 
member of the farming communi 
ty to do just a little more tfhan 
than lie h.is ever done. 



WANTS A SILO. 

Bert Rouse, one of tho most ex- 
tensive farmers on tho pike be- 
tween Burlington and Florense, 
has declared another winter will 
not find him without a silo qt a 
large capacity. He says he now 
has corn stalks enough lying in 
his feed lot to fill" a good siz- 
ed silo, all of which Would have 
been consumed by his stock had 
they been converted into silage. 
He claims a silo will not only 
save food for him, but it will mike 
feeding a winter like this lias 
been, a real pleasure toliim'. He- 
can not enjoy having the snow oM 
of a fodiVr shock sliding down 
his back when the mercury is 
eight or ten degrees below zero. 



.Mi:s.\ 

Mis. 



A clerical error nuiunwliors In <-oii- 
/•U-. . ha-, i. >iiii. ( j ui rulslng the Pa li- 
mns tuual soi - >*i uor bj i MiiNMi 
,, v.ui iln-y I'll u-. but If anything 
MM i tin t tfaould tsppen i<> w «rn wx 
ttMUoi Ut«t lb* uwu wi«» d Mm. I 

only a fr»a taonl hs ago f i 
home near Lira iburi i 



it ml with 



OSlruU in 



M. GRAVES DEAD. 
at, Craven di il .it her 
home in Kriiui -.ii- last Phui'sdaj 
in ht week after an illm-sH of only 
n i vt hours, ii r husband and 

daughter were ii Ulivi in Klnr- 

• nee thai day nn I 1 1> \v v ere call- 
ed home in the afternoon Mr* 

j ( 'ra\ i'ii never r t rrrnerl i n <■ -n- 

' H" ittrr Mill- \i .[ ■ • ' i ii-l. -ii. 

j M.'l 

i ilan : M. r ol Mi mil -I- . 

HlHl in I i 

i i'ii . ii< and 

Mi in i 



There will be a ball at the town 
hall in Union next Friday night. 

Four years ago last Saturday 
night the jail at this place was 
burnt. It was a very cold night 
■»♦ ♦ ♦ 

Charles Schramm, of Petersburg, 
has been appointed deputy coun- 
ty clerk. 

Thi> first sleigh bells of the sea- 
son were heard last Friday. Win- 
ter arrived Thursday n'ighi 

Considerable of recently killed 
meat has spoiled. 

•Ht-fc* 

Very few hogs have been driven 
from this section .since the mar- 
ket became so flat. 

» * * • 

Jno. P. Scott, on> of the oldest 



. Ho will do it. Thi* big drive is ! fruit growers in this county says 



on and tho farmer will be in tne 
front ranks of them that go over 
the top. That is every farmer who 
think and roads and plans intelli- 
gently for the big task that in now 
ayjiiting him will be-. 

LEVY OF FIFTY CENTS 

On $100 risked By Supt. Gilbert For 
Kentucky Schools. 

Frankfort.— An appeal is being 
made to the members of the leg- 
islature by V. O. Gulbert, State 
Superintendent of Public Schools, 
to amend the school laws to per- 
mit a levy of 50 cents on the 
$100 value of taxable property for 
school purposes. He would have 
the school amended so as to make 
the school age in the State from 
six to twenty years, instead of 
from six to eighteen. An eight j 



this will not be a good fruit year*, 
because fifty years observation has 
taught him that when the sun 
i.hine3 on New Year's day the fruit 
crop will bo small. 

Died on the 28th inst., of par- 
alysis, Mrs. N, E. Hawes aged 71. 
Rev. Jeffries, of Covington, con- 
ducted the funeral. 

Esqs. Reuben Conner and Cy 
Riddell were appointed a commit- 
tee to ascertain for what the 
poor house and land near Burling- 
ton can be sold, and for what 
more suitable land can be bought. 

Tho select party given New 
Year's eve at Morgan Academy 
Hall, was one of the gay occasions 
of tho season. 

T'f1"r 



theis- country's call for more sheep 
and more wool, and if the next 
Legislature will enact a law- 
placing restrictions on the dog 
that will permit the farmer to 
have his flocks unmolested, the 
sheep industry in old Kentucky 
soon will show a great improve- 
ment." 



THE INCOME TAX. 



CRADDOCK-IRWINE. 

Mr. Russell Craddock and Miss 
Hallie Lee Irwine, gave their 
friends a little Christmas surprise 
by driving to Rev. C. T.Clauncha 
home, Brlanger, last Saturday, 
noon and getting married. They 
will reside for the time being 
near Union. Their many friends, 
join in wishing them much joy, 



Collector of Internal Revenue, 
Charles B. Thompson, has announc 
ed that officers have started on 
the job in the county assijned 
them to meet the people and 
help them make out their income 
tax returns. The officers assigned 
to this county are due at Walton, 
Jan. 29th to Feb 2nd ; Union* Feb. 
4th to Feb. 6th; Burlington, Feb 
7th to Feb. 11th; Hebron, Feb 12 
to Feb. 13th It will be well for 
every unmarried person whose net 
income for 1917 is $1,000 or over, 
and every .married person living 
with wife or husband whose net; 
income for 1917 is $2,000 or over, 
to call on the officers and learn , 

whether or not they have anv tax r happiness and success 
to pay. Collector Thompson said: 
"The person subject to tax who 
doesn't make return in the time 
prescribed is going to regret it. 
The Government will get after all 
income tax slackers. 

"There*s hardly a business man, 
merchant or professional man who 
won't have to make return of in- 
come. Farmers, as a class, wiR 
have to pay the tax. The safe; 
thing to do is for every person 
who had a total income of $1,000 
or $2,000, as the case may be, and 
who is not sure about whatdeduc 
tionB the law allows him to play 
it safe by calling on the income 
tax man. 

"The men in the field will have 
forms for ev erb yody ~and— persons 
who expect to call on him neea 
not trouble themsevles to write 
to the collector for forms." 



to be taught in the public schools 
after 1920. 



County Court.— Samuel Weldon'd 



month's school term for the ru- 

teachers' certificates after 1920, 
and require elementary agriculture 



PAID FOR HIS DOG. 

When Charles Stevens, canvas- 
ser in the Christmas Red Cross 
drive called oil bi) neighbor, L. 1' 
Rice, Mr. l!ice soon listed himself 
and i be other tbreo members of 
i be family, vrtioriVne chanced to 
spy his (to -r, when he remarked, 
••I b"i-e is my dog, pul him doM n, 
too' and handed Mr. Stevens the 

dollar for lb- membership fee, 
and now ho prides himself on be- 
ing the only person in thecoun* 
t y who oa ns n dog thnl Is i 

in- in 1 1 i -ii i iii iti-ii Cru - 

KlLLINd K A KBITS 

Ow.-n luuuU NuuiihIm in i-l 
i :il.l |l ill lVO ('III i.-il m i ' 

nii-i i- M i houtnnd <ii i bi 

■oe i in- ghoal ib Uo 

iittin, ul « hit Ii pi m 



Oscar Gaines, Cy Riddell, A. B, 
Whitlock, Jas. Br^den, Reuben Con 
ner, H. Ashley. T, J. Akin, J: A. 
Kendall, J. S Huey, II. Bannister. 
Tho will of F. Smith was probat- 
i ed and J. F Smith quali led as ex- 
ecutor. The will of J C. Hu^lu-s 
was probated and Q-. w and J. C. 
Hughes qualified as executors and 
Amanda Hugh s ;.s cm c itrix 
Ksqs. Gaines, Huey mi K\inla!l 
utjiioi ht il a I'-miiii l ee t> h t\ 
cistern buili in co i ' Ti m f y »r f 
W. L Riddell, H. J. Poster and 
John K irk pat i ■ k -. ach fin d fifty 
cents for e iiiinvl-' "i court for 
htandin-', up i i I out I room, 



( 'hi i-.t mi ■ e iilr .» 
li ne ton i •■ > 1 1 '.i ■•' ' 'I "■ 
Oi K'Himii li illdl 'i. ■ I 

a liil I b • 'i 
Young Am- i 

; +-S- 

Many I n in •> H b a\ 
< ui ii gf-OUtitJ "M.k.-li 



I 



•II 111 



I'.UI- 



SOMETHING NEW. 

A record typewriter has been in 
stalled in the County Clerks o*- 
lice, and all deeds and mortgages 
hereafter will be recorded by that 
machine, which is only a typewrit- 
er so constructed as to be usea 
in recording the above named in- 
struments. Besides making a re- 
cord that can be read by any per- 
son who can read print.it makes 
a much neater record, is a time 
saver for the clerk and a money 
saver for the State in the way 
of record books as one page tf[ 
typewritten record will contain as 
much as two pages of record 
made with a pen. Deputy Clerk, 



at several places in Burlington 
it was reported eight degrees be- 
low. It is tho unanimous opinion 
that this part of the country 
has had its quota of zero weather. 

DIDN'T LIKE THE OUTLOOK. 

John Hogan, of Ludlow, was in 
Burlington, one day last week. He 
is a tobacco dealer of long 
standing, but not liking the out- 
look early in the season, Tie din 
not load up with a very large pur 
chase, although some he bought 
as high as $30 a hundred. He was 
not at all encouraged by the mar- 
ket outlook, and was glad he haa 
only a small purchase. 



AN OLD TIME WINTER. 

So far this has been an exact 
reproduction of the winters the 
school books of forty years ago 
told about, and the same being 
profusely illustrated in the old 
Farmers' and Mechanics' almanac. 
It refreshes the memory of the 
older "skates" in the country in 
regard to their school days. 



BRING IT HOME. 

Some person has borrowed a 
large pipe wrench belonging to 
this office and failed to return it 
which ha« been a very great in- 
convenience. If you, dear reader, 
have that wrench in you r poosea 
sioh you will confer a great favor 
by returning it immediately. Don't 
delay any longer. 



KEPT BUSY. 

The local attorneys were kept 
pretty busy during the holidays 
assisting the boys fiU out their 
questionalrea, they coming in from 
every direction, far and near. 
These young men are all on the 
stool of uncertainty,' not knowing 
what arrangements to make for 
the present year. 



WAS INSURED. 

Alfred Stanley Cason, of Belle- 
\iew, a select who died recently 
at Camp Taylor, had his life in- 
sured for $10,500, his mother being 
the beneficiary. Having been in 
the service since early in last 
Miss Lizzie Rogers, is' in expert j September, he had made only a 
with a typewriter, and the rapi.i- few small payments thereon. 

ity with which sho can put a deeu j ■ 

or mortgage on recod with the j EXHILERATING SPORT. 
machine is astonishing. It is a I N Oo0I .; u „ natha throutrh fr..... 

long ways from «b» hand made i ifffSSJ iran 3 exhirer!£n| exe ' 
poose qmll pen for recording pu.- . ..TTL Zri **. * ,tl 



poses to the record typewrite.-. 






SOLI) A HORSE POR * 11,000. 



a liberal usi 
• ; cru.-k 
, ■ vell'i 



cise that never fails to give a 
person a jrood appetite for his 
breakfast, as many persona in this 
part of the country can testify* 
J. H Respoas, the noted turi ng their testimony on their 

man, put over the bi fgj -t holiday recent experiences, 
ileal of any eltiaen in Boone eoun-j : — m 

ty. Hi> sold bis racing sralUon, f FILLED HIS ICEHOUSE 

Marathon-, to a Unfniui in Can- , ,, bwm-i ., * i „ 

ado for 130,000. It « .ms that | Y £^?rf3 JSft! 1 ..* ^ J bu " 

Marathon© is tl second ISO ■ ^ wV '' ''' '' ''' 

i i , ,. I...II Ui» mint crop ami be m not «-» 



,j purchas d i.e. nl'y. 



ronnldu] 






I- 



roll 



| i HID « ll"ie I In- v 

•ill to murki I 






\V l»i 
hut te-«'!«|li Khw» 

office ui III 

Hooue « ty l>««|*Mdl bans, 

!| bo in iiuW . 



Unit 



it 

>i 1 1 



-Villi 



III 



ine mint crop and b.- i 

.ular and | £■ «"*n^'l. wMlo the »( 

nrrhrPhntnn |Uu».omae» uu mwully I..*!.. 

■ 
NTRY Hl'Pl'UI 

Mm I'le lout |MtlMltMM» 

by th« hard freosaa the putt 
month, ami tii-> In** will Da B-ar- 
»ff |fc «rly h**vy these high pi 

Kiuuttu i .tviii^ it bars. 



ii i h>n i 

u III 



whtrev 

»i 



__— 



m—m~— 



— i 



THURSDAY JANUARY 10th, 1918 



BOONE COUNtY RECORDER 



/ 



S 



^WALTON DEPARTMENT.* 

D. B. WALLACE, Manager. 
Hand your new* item* to Mr. D. B. Wallace at the Walton Equita- 
ble Bank and Trust Co.'b building. He is also authorized to re- 
cieve subscriptions and collect other accounts. 



* 



Miss Alii© Mae Steger of Owen- | Died.— John Vest, aged about 70 
ton, spent the holidays" here with i years, at the county infirmary, on 
friends. I Dec. 26th, after a long illness; 

John Wood of Louisville, spent I Ho leaves three children, Samuel 
the first of the week here with ' and Leonard Vest of Richwood 
old friends. I neighborhood, and Miss Edith Vest 

Goo. Ryan who is in the IT S. I of Walton. Ths> funeral took place 
service at Louisville spent part I Thursday at Verona. 
of the week here with relatives. I W. Q Best of Warsaw, spent 

Dr. W, E. Pister spent the past \ Thursday here closing up his pur- 
week with relatives and friends at ehas» of the orick house and sev- 
his old homo at Bellevue, Camp- en acres of ground near the old 
i>ell county. I to11 S at0, house in North Walton, 

Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Holder oT,^" 1 "* the property from J. M 

Cincinnati, were the guests of his ft™™?' 5* ?« P *r? 8 v° mov * to 
mother Mrs. W, B. Norman a part I the property in March, 
of last week. Th » Equitable Bank and Trus- 

Mrs. J, W. Thomas who has been '£? mp , ai 7 at , If meeting last Fri- 
111 for some time has given up her ?«y dwlared its semi-annual div- 
boarding house until her health ^f nc \ of , " lx . **£ „ cent - on i*s cap- 
become* better. ! lta » •\ oc . k | °* WO.000, being 12 per 
u i , r t-ii /-! •«.it r eent dividend it has declared this 
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Griffith of, year Thp hanlr ««»!,. ««m» 

Chas. L Griffith. „ Dle ?- ~ Sv vanus Johnson, a gea 

Dr. and Mrs, G. P. Hollowayano faVl^j"!!"' j^° homoof XT hi8 

two children spent the holidays i?"5. S ^? U %i£ n 5 on on 2 ew 

with their relatives in Barren and H?was nnlnf rfcJ \2F snra P tio3 ; 

Hardin counties. ™ ored ntS In Iwlt^* y " Unff ^ 

«• m * r. • -i i _•. / orea rue" in this comro»:,. ana 

Miss Tete Percival has accepted was employed in the Walton Gar- 
th* position of bookkeeper in tne age. T V%ern1un i were interred 
Walton Garage and began hex du- in the Rlchwood cemetery, 
ties last veeK. Th(> travelingf publio is grea tly 

Miss Zou Lou Mayhugh has ac- ploased over tne replacing of the 
S P . te t Posnion as clerk in the B lue Grass Special train on the 
Walton Mercantile Co., and is giv- Q . & Q raiIroa<i Th * train ° ^ 
mg good satisfaction. here for Cincinnati at 9:13 a. m 

Oswald E. Peterson left last and on its southbound trip reach 
week for Akron, Ohio, where he es here at about 5 o'clock The 
has a position on a large* oon- Carolina Special filled the place 
tract oi street building. of this train but was very un- 

Tho holiday dance given by the satisfactory on account of the 
Walton Social Ciub Dec. 2t>th at irregular time, 
tho opera house was a delightful Fred Miller who recently enlist- 
affair and was well attended. ed in the aviation corps and ia 

Claud© Black, of IJig Eone located at Camp Taylor, was re- 
Springs, who is in the service at nuembered by his recent employ- 
Camp Taylor, enjoyed a furlough ers The Mishawaka Woolen Com- 
tbe past week with home folks. pany with a big box of tobacco, 

Bluford W. Aylor who has oeen cigars, candi-s. sardines, cheese, 
here on a visit to relatives ana honey, and a big sick American 
friends left Wednesday for his "*?•. ^ flrm prized him as one 
home at Granden, North Dakota. °£ the oest salesmen they had on 

Postmaster 0. T, Dudgeon | th ^. roa ^ r , f t y ear - 
spont Priday at Burlington on post ' x/~ nas \ \ V - a " wntes llls Parents 
office business having charge ot!^ r -, and A * ra James Watson of near 
all of tho postoifices in Uoonei „ valton tnat he is on his way to 
county. l?,r anco - He has oeen stationed at 

Mr/ and Mrs W. T. Loomis of ! £™£ amJ Sf a Jll S rk ' Ga ' for . . Bom& 

He also expresses-- h i s gr at 



time. Mr; Ciisler was a good 
"citizen and had many excellent 
qualities that won him a host of 
friends. The funeral took place 
Sunday morning at 10 o'clock from 
tht* Walton Baptist church the 
services ,belng conducted by Rev. 
A. £irtley Johnson of Ghent, af- 
ter which the remains were laid 
to rest in the cemetery at Rich- 
wood. 

Walton Lodge I. O O. P., elect- 
ed officers at the regular meet- 
ing last Saturday night as lo- 
lows : i 

Noble Grand— Carl NeumoisVr. 
Vice Grand— E. \Y, McElroy! ' 
Secretary— S. W, Bevarly. 
Treasurer— H. C, Dims, 
R. S N. G.-N. T, Welsh k 
L. S— W. T. Dudgeon. 
Warden-D. B, Wallace. 
Conductor— Jno. L, Vest. 
R. S, V. a-Millard Allen. 
L. S,— J. G. Pennington. 
R. S, S.— A. M. Edwards, 
L. S, S.— E. P. Neumeister, 
Chaplain.— Jaa Bolington. 
S. P G.— Ed. PullUove. 
Inside -Guardian— I. T, Grubba. 
Outside* Guardian— Arthur Smith. 
Host— Wm. C, Moxlev. 
Walton Lodge P. & A. M. elect- 
ed officers as follows Dec. 27th : 
W. M— Andrew J. Thomas. 
S. W, -Samuel H. McCartt. 
Junior Warden— Geo. J, Grubbs. 
Treasurer— D. B, Wallace, 
Secretary— E. M, Johnson. 
S. D — A. Records Johnson. % 

Junior Deacon— Carl Neumeister. 
Chaplain— Dr. G, P. Holloway. 
S. S— John C. Bedinger. 
J. S,— W. R Rouse. 
Tyler— Jas.T Hurt. 
Walton Lodge K. of P elected 
and installed officers as follows 
for the ensuing term: 
C. C— Wm. E Dixon. 
V. C— W. D. Kennedy. 
Prelate— E. W. McElrov. 
K. R and Seal -Thos. Curlrv. 
M. of P— W. O. Rous?-. 
M. at A,— W. C. Moxl-y. 
I. G,— Carl Neumeister. 
Outer Guard— Bruce Dudgeon. 



Seeds that Grow 



seeds that have 



time. 



daughter Mrs. John L, Vest 
husuand. 



SeSlKflSe 'S££*^*^helrt n5 £ to "" Sunday SchoofteSch 

tae ," er Mt*s. H B. Allphin, the Chris- 
anu .tian church and the loc:jl Rea 

^ u i^? ross for thp,ir kind reme*nbrances 

Miss Edna Welsh entertained her during the Christmas holidays 

young iriends with a 'mosc enjoy- 1 j ud <«, T a Tnmi) n „„^ t t 

able party Christmas night ac tna Vest W' Wn , if" ??°~ h 

home of bar father Nicholas Welsh ■ J^k h£n*Hn<, & busy the past 

and wii*> ; r% eeK P re P a nng the answers to 

" , M i . „ „ th^* questionaires sent to those 

Rev. and Mrs, Joseph B. Harris who have registered for the irmv 

and lit de daughter ox near Chic- service, there being a large num- 

ago, spent the holidays here ber and the work bein<- extensiv" 

with her parents Mr. and Mrs W. and particular. Messrs. ' TomHn ana 

K. Rouse, i Vest volunteered to do this work 

JMuss Sybil Hurt wjj^o teaches without any charge and the reg- 

the pubuc school at Jonesvide, istrants appreciate their g^neros- 

Owen county, spent the holidays ity. 

here with her parents Mi. and Mrs, \ Mrs. C, K. Wood died very sud- 
Jas. % Hurt j denly last Friday at her home 

Kenneth Johnson who is a page near Bi» Bone Springs. She had 
in tho halls ot Congress at Wash- been talking over the telephone 
ington, spent the hodciays here just a few minutes before she was 
With his parents Mr. and Mrs ; seized with a pain in her heart 
John B. Johnson | a »d died before medical aid 

Judge and Mrs. J, G. Tomlin I £ ould ^ summoned. Mrs Wood 
were presented with a fiue daugh ; wa ? a , ou \ 60 . years old and leaves 
tor Sunday night, weighing nine !L ftU w and ' four sons and one 
and one-half pounds. Dr G. C °; au ? nt ^r. and a host of friends 

who sorrow over her sudden 



HIGHEST POINT IN OUR 

History and We Expect to Go Higher 

Statement Equitable Bank <fe Trust 
Co., Walton, Ky., at close of busi- 
ness January 5th. 1918: 

Resources. 

Loans & Discounts &C>2,999.fiN 

Cash and Due from Bks. 112,137.80 
Bank'.y; house «fe fixtures 



is what you want when you buy ; 
high purity and germination tests. 

You can get weed seeds for nothings We know 
Seeds, and we have the best connections in the seed 
producing sections of the country, which enables 
us to go direct to the section where grown, and get 
the purest and best to be had. " 

Every bag of Seed we send out is tagged as to 
purity and germination according to the Kentucky 
PURE FOOD LAW, and you will always find our 
Seeds above the standard. Write prices and sam- 
ples and be convinced. We are now trie largest 
in Northern Kentucky. 



United Statea Food Administration License No. G 1770 



tyCdfrasidMumfies 



GROCERIES. FLOUR SEEDS. MEDICINES. 
(3-2/P/KE ST. /8-20W.7I»ST 



Covington, Kentucky. 

Phones South 335 and 336. 



Sheriff's Sale for Taxes. 



<3HS= 






^4^. 



Notice is hereby given that I or my 

4,000.1)0 | deputy will, on Monday, February 

ft h i Wlfl. {t h^lnp 1 f!niint.v^murtxUy f 



Liabilities. 

Capital S teeV 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits . . 
Deposits. 

Total 



^4 !5!t, 1,17.4a j between the hours of K)a. m. aud 2, 
1 o'clock p. m., at the Court House 



$50,000.00 
10.000.00 



pounds. 
Bankins attenuing. 



B. Leslie Jones of Chicago, spen t 
the holidays here with his par- 
ents Dr. and Mrs, A. IN 

as oeen 
weeks on a visit. 



death. 

The Walton Loose Leaf market 

ad a sale last Saturday, about 

A. sN. Jones. 50,000 pounds being on the marke 4 

His wiie has oeen nere several ( and. averaging in° the sale J-21.76' 

I The tobacco is in such a -wet 
Robt. Northcutt who is in the ' condition that it is doubtful if an- 
United States army and stationeu other sale will be held until next 
at Camp Taylor at Louisville spent Saturday. Th© shipping facilities 
part oi the- weeis witn hia par- ^ re rather uncertain, and thecon- 
ents Mr. and Mrs, T. ±J. Northcutt . dition of the tobacco will hardly 
near town. | justifv being in the hogshead any 

Mrs. [Nannie Griffith-Peterson SH'SL^LflP^ and - as a result, 
who has been here on a 



» ?«» """fket is not strong and ac- 
, Urifmh, left Ja 3l , th?*market ge " 9r ' ° Pin ° D *" ' 



week for Akron, Ohio, to join her a ; d £'hZ Zl\ muc \ stron S er 

husband O. if; Peterson who baa a ! ? th ^ 8r ?SLP , l ce ^ p . reva i f as *° on 
poLition there. i a ,? f . tn9 to^co is m better con- 

i "ition and ample shippin? facili- 

Misses Aileen and Mary Cham- ties are afforded, 
bers entertained their young | Stanley D. S, Ranson of near 
Inends with a •delighviul social Richwood and Miss Laura Brooke 
party at the home of their par- itedinger were united in the bond f 
ents Mr. and Mrs Scott Chamoers of holy wedlock at thp Presby- 
last Saiuruay night. _^ | terian church at Anchorage. Dec. 

Dr. A, E. Chambers of Texar- ? 6th » ** v - ChaB . P>at$er officiat- 
kana, Arkansas, and sister Mrs. "?£• Tie bride's sister Mis* Hen- 
Milo Atkinson of Memphis, Tenn., rietta Bedinger was maid of hon- 
spent part of the holidays here or » and MiBB Dorothy Bedinger 
the guests of their brother C. : S as brideft maid. Mrs Geo. W7 
Scott Chambers and family. Ranson and daughter Miss Lave- 

M .„ T „„ ,, .. ,. L J ilette of Richwood, and Miss Lila 

Miss Jane Vallandinghara enter-* Stephenson of New York City 
tamed a number of her young attended the wedding. Among the 
friends with a social party New presents were a silver service 
xear.a eve, watching the old year that had been in the Ranson 
out and welcoming in the new family sine© the Revolutionary 
year. A most enjoyable time was; war. Mr, and Mrs. Ranson spent 
upent by the young folks. j their honeymoon with relatives at 

Mias Isabel Dickey who i« at- 1 Lexington and Cincinnati, and wil 
tending the State University at : n-ake their home with his mother 
Lexington and her sister Mias Mr8< Ge °i Ranson on the farm 
Nida who is teaching at Danville, near , Richwood. Their many 
spent he holidays here with their ; friends extend their best wishes 
mother Mrs. Belle W. Dickey. for ,, a lon S and ha PPy 1H» to- 

ta . »» , »■-*•' \ ** Igether. 

Dr. and Mrs, Jos. Baker of Co- 1 T . _ _ . , 
lumbus, Ohio, and Dr. and Mrs, John G. Crisler, one of our old 
B. W, Stallard and little daughter ? nd esteemed citizens, died at his 
of Madisonville. O., spent part of hoine h f r . e » last Friday, night after 
tho holidays here with their par- a short illness of pneumonia. He 
ents Judge and Mrs. Thomas F, j J** B **"" m Lincoln county, Ky., 
Curley. " 2 years ago, and came to Boone 

„ , „ .. . ., . I county when a young man, resid- 

Fred Callendar has been sta- i ng here the balance of his days. 
tioned at LaGrange the past when the civil war broke out, 
week as a "special" doing^ work though but a young man, heen- 
for the L. & N, Railroad Coi, in ii 8te d in thg cause of the\ South 
tho telegraph ofuce, and assist- and won tho reputation of beta? 
ing tho agent Jos. McCormick in a bravo and valiant soldier On 
hia duUoa. b ig return from the war ho at^. 

Married.— D. J. Moore of Indiana I'tondod school with his cousin, 

«olia, and Miss Dell Rooerts, of the late Judge Ben 8. Lindsay 0/ 
/alton, at Covington, Dec. 29th Warsaw, as his teacher. Mr Crls- 
They left at once jor Tampa, Fla, ler's wife died about 25 years a-o, 
to Atamti a part of the winter. u »d lw> is wirvivod by nine chil- 
Th» wrlde is the daughter of drwn, Mrs. Hara (Heno <# Coving- 
Mrs. Ruth Roberts of Walton I ton, Mrs. Rpbt Snow of lUi-h- 

-, _ . , _ * _ ^ I wood, Mrs. Miud Adamn, of Cov- 

. Coc ° t Z °* h ??! " "y-- J ._ C -_ .^f* ington, Miss Kiln Crialar of Hpir- 
ttnrilpctcm, smstn i«nnm- u William. Robert and Kmorson 
day «UMVi*« ***- Crirtor of Covington, John CrUlar 
now aad with friaoda. Prof, (lor- of North Dako ^ Alex CrM „ of 



Onii-frs: 

C. L. Griftlth, Tros. 

.Ino. L. Vest. Vice Pros. 

D. R. Wallace, Cashier. 

Jno. C. Miller, Asst. Cash. 

J. G. Tomlin, Atty. 



duor, in- the town of Burlington, 

Boone County, Ky., expose to public 

'. sale for cash in hand, the following 

T7 99<" M6 I de *arlbed pr<M )t>rt yi° r so much there- 

' ' " '"• ! Of as may be necessary to nay State, 

cio,| ..- i S ; County and School taxe-t due there- 

" '" ' '* ' j on and unpaid for the year 1917, ana 

I the* Int e r es t) penalty and cost thero- 

ion. For a complete description of 

I property see Assessor's book for as- 

j sessment of 1916, at County Clerk's 

! Office. w. d. cropper; 

Ex-Sherin* Boone County. 



We. pay i per cent, on time deposits. Belleview Precinct 

Pays six per cent semi-annual divi- No - > s ™ Kelly, Elbert heirs 
dends. Try us on any banking prop 
ositlon. Write us. - 



State News. 



don 1* making «n ^^'•"t^ol wuton. all of whom wero prewnt 

county Id ftoa worilnf coodltloo wh9 WM ,„,,«• to reach h«*r*» in Bracks oouutj 



Henderson. — Notwithstanding 
the fact that over $1,000,000 has 
been withdrawn from Henderson 

JankB for the Liberty Loan, the 
anuary statements s'how the 'Big- 
gest deposits in their history. 

Franklin. — Foreign buyers pur- 
chased 43 mules on the Franklin 
market, paying an average of $235, 
This was said by experienced 
mule dealers to be the highest 
general average ever paid on*thi3 
market for mules. 

Carlisle. — Watt Hunter, a far- 
mer, of Blue Lick SpdngB, this 
county, killed a large eagle on his 
farm and brought it to this city. 
Tho .eagle measured 7 feet from 
tip to tip. This is the first 
eagle seen in this county Tor many- 
years. *i 

Carlisle.— A suit has been filed 
in the Nicholas circuit court by 
Lindsay Stone, of this county, 
against Thos. Riley, of this city, 
alleging that Hhis- buggy was 
struck by the automobile of Mr. 
Riley, causing him severe injuries. 
He suob for $5,000 damages. 

Owehsbord. — Wm, Peak, a tar 
mer, 70 years old, living in the 
Moseleyville neighborhood, is dead 
from a bullot wound hrough the 
left temple. The wound was self- 
inflicted. The cause' attributed for 
the act is said to have been per- 
sistent brooding over having kUl 
ed a man many years ago. 

Winchester. — Geo Woods, a 
negro, was arrested on a charge 
of burning his wifo to death in 
their home. Firemen wore driven 
back by the flames, and after two 
hours found the woman's body 
charred to a criBp. The warrant 
against Woods was issued while 
he was at hte wife's funeral. He 
denies the charge. 

Barbourville.— While the 12-year 
old son of the Rev. George Mc- 
Donald was playing with a shot- 
gun tho weapon was discharged. 
The charge struck the boy's 3-year 
old sister in the head, tearing it 
from the body. Tha gun had 
been left on the front -porch of 
the McDonald residence by a neigh 
bor. 

OLD KENTUCKY ON THE JOB 
WHEN IT COMES TO FIGHTING. 
Kentucky an inland siate surpris 
ed herself and tho. country in gen- 
eral, during fhe year 1917 by sup- 
plying tho Navy with 2000 volun- 
teers. 

A BIG I)AY FOR THKJl'IMiK. 

County Judge Cason says that Is 
all hiH official ©xperlencs lual 

Monday was tlr» blgvcet «weariiig- 
in day ho ever had. All thetcoun- 
tjr officials were tWof!) •» 1 1* •• » 

•lay. 

I»i V.. Hon 1 til* 

fatk«tt, Mr AUtx unlet S el ton, of 



\\ 
II 



34 acres land $ S. 10 

No. 937 Rice Heirs 

Lot in Belleview 3.05 

Constance Precinct. 
No. 1499 Clark, John B., nr > 

2 lots in Constance 6.83 

No. 1B39 Parker, Win. R. nr 

Lot in Constance 8.10 

No. 1645 Peno, John « 

9 acreH and lot 16.60 

No. 1661 Phelps, Lewis 

80 acres land and lot. . . 28.65 
No. 1711 Souther, E. A. 

53 acres land 40.10 

Florence Precinct. 
No. 1962 Conner, F. R. 

1 lot in Florence 8.04 

No. 2001 Dulaney. B. A. 

2 lots in Florence 20,80 

No. 2116 Middendorf, H. J., nr 

10 acres land. 21.10 

No. 2151 Rhodes, Albert, 10a of 

land near Kenton line. . 22.50 
No. 2170 Rouse, Ollie P. nr. lot 

— on Florence*. Union pk 4.14 
Hamilton Precinct. 
No. 2502 Richardson, J. M., nr 

9 acres land 4.00 

No. 2510 Rich, W. O. B., est 

24 acres land 4.20 

Petersburg Precinct. 
No. 2671 Burns, W. S. 

lot in Petersburg h 05 

No. 2672 Burns, Hubert 

lot. in Petersburg 7.63 

No. 2728 Gordon, M. L., nr 

- l ot in P e ter s b urg, 17.80 fl I — 

No. 2782 Hoffman, Charles 

lot in Petersburg 10.90 

No. 2796 Klopp, Frank, nr. 

60 acres land 14,60 

No. 2803 Lawrenceburg Ferry Co 

1 lot near ferry 5.65 

No. 2548 Peck, J. C est 

lot in Petersburg *■ 4.80 

No. 2926 Tilley, Ralph C. 

lot in Petersburg 4.95 

Union Precinct. 
No. 3160 Rouse. W. N. 

lot In Union 9.85 

Verona Precinct. 
No. 3393 Kite, Mrs. Mattie 

105 acres and 3 acres . . . 22.55 
No. H427 McKenzie, W. E. 

30a land on Verona and 

Grant county road 11.35 

No. 3429 Napier, Charley, nr 

2 acres land 9.25 

No. 3498 Vest, Mrs. Eliza 

60 acres land on Walton 

and Verona road 30.99 

No. 3527 Webster, Carl 

16 acres land 24.30 

Walton Precinct,. 
No. 3587 Adams, Mrs. Susie N. 

7a land in Florence prec 1 1 .64 
No. 3588 Adams, Arthur, nr 

1 lot 2.46 

No. 3683 Colston, Charley 

lot in Walton. ft.44 

No. 3774 Hopperton, Joe 

lot In Walton . . 15.30 

No. 3800 Johnson, E. M., nr 

lot In Walton 88.06 

No. 4219 Wilson, Roland 

lot 1916 luxe*, $5.10 

1917 taxes, 6.80 10.38 

No. IOIH Yollell, Mm. P. C. 

, lot iii Walton. 13.20 

N... 4091 Berry. John (col) 

lot In \Vftlhm fl.BO 

N... 1888 Brown, Bteve<ool), 

1818 Uxea, $6 75 
1088 1917 taxua. (LOU, lut2yr» 11.76 
No. »<>77 Honour, Jm*nle, (col) 

lot In Walton U.ai 



That New Year Resolution! 

You will be able to keep it if you carry your account 
with us as it is our business to help you. 

The taxes and three per cent interest is paid on your 
time deposits. What about those valuable papers ? Don't 
vou need a Safety Deposit Box in our vault? The rent 
is small. 

You can purchase TJ. S. Thrift Stamps, Savings Cer- 
tificates and Liberty Bonds from us. 

The 3rd Liberty Loan will be offered by the Govern- 
ment February 15th. Send us your orders. Our service 
is free. 

Peoples, Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 
W. L. B. ROUSE, Pres. A. B. RENAKER, Cashier. 

> Q . <!8 OQi O '0 . 8> 8»<MBXa»€>€ »OOCtO'0 , < £j 






5 The Tri-State Patron Says:- ' 

"No Thank*, Mr. Station Man, after cutting the feed-cleaning the •table- 
milking the cowi^nd running the separator, I will alto by my own rail- 
j road ticket instead of paying you a FAT commission. If there is anything 
( ) easy about keepiug cows, I want it myself." 

Every fanner should ship his cream DIRECT to the Creamery. 

55 Cents 



per pound for Butter Fat week beginning Jan. 7, 1918 

The Tri-State Butter Co. 



CINCINNATI, OHIO 

UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION 
License No. G- 181 52 

I ) 25,000 of the largest producers have found the Tri-State always dependable 
[ j and most profitable. Do not let the Station Buyer talk you out of your cream 

II and make for himself a profit of about 2c per pound or more. Ship US your 
a 1 next can or if you need cans, we will send them prepaid for 30 days trial. 



"^S=^>i 



Subscribe for the Recorder. 
Only $1.50 the Year 

Rcod Our Advertisements and Profit Bv Them. 



$200,000 

Over $200,000 worth of property 
sold in last few months. Want 
more good farms to sell, after the 
holidays; 

Gr. B. POWERS, Sale.man 
Equitable Bk. Hldg. Walton", Ky 



FOR SALE. 

Rhode Inland Kml UockoroU, $1.60 
a piece. Phone Beavvr 'Mb. 
omoul Mm. L. M. UOlldK. 



Take Your Coeaty Paper, 



For Sale-6 Good Farms 



Beekenhoklt farm, loaacwB $0,ono 

Polnor farm, iHt acres b.CXX, 

Ulfl »cr«t funn 8,100 

The aYbQVe fiirniH bare i»««t of • \ 
Impro^omenta, large imniH and 
houHxH with modern improve- 
ments. 
(U) acreH j/ood tobacco land OKU 

York villo 2.00U 

•0 aorA farm, w»«U locatwl . . . . d.auo 

fcOaure farm 8,200 

-»iOho tlrnt i-lj»«u(lr. ;.<ndnl<< property 

Addreaa 

WAURKN TNHHH, 
jaiiio-4 Lawreiuwburjr, Ind . 



w&i&ms. 



Mta 



mammmmmmmmmm 



mmmm 



L 



d. 



■an 



BOONE COUNT V RECORDER 



/ 



H SUek'a JSews 



ftoeera'oer dirt its bit furnishing? 
t>wi»ter weather. 



IHTiRSDAY JANUARY 10th, t918 



v 



"W. IV Cropper is now among 
tBe> x's in so far as office iscon- 
oorned. 



The 1918 auto license are show- 
ing up now, and they are not very 
ornamental. 



County Judge Cason was confin- 
ed to the house dunpg the hol- 
idays on account ofillncaa. 



There were no unusual .activities 
among the youn^ people of Bur- 
lington during tho holidays. 

If the wind whistles through the 
cow stalls you are not going to 
got much milk during the winter. 

Tho local 6chool is in session, 
tho pupils and teachers having 
had a very pleasant holiday vaca- 
tion. 



Despite their great efforts to 
save their flowers many ladies in 
this county were great losers 
along that line. . - 



Sheriff Cropper's foot went bum 
on him during the holidays, and 
he had to call on his cane to as- 
sist his locomotion. 



- Stand out against every forwam 
■movement made in your commun- 
ity, then move away and make 
all your neighbors glad. 



The trapping season closed 
with tho old year, consequently 
tho local dealer in furs is not 
receiving many pelts now. 

Miss Elsio B. Purnell will have 

a Bale pf personal property at her 

home near Hopeful church this 

■afternoon, beginning at 1 o'clock. 

Joseph Huey was laid up for re- 
pairs several days the past week, 
and Jerry Fowler had full charge 
of his creamery business at Bur- 
lington. 

The heaviest* food contracts in 
th o history of tho world havn 



been let recently to fourteen of 
tho great packing houses of the 
United States. 



JosepTl Huey's milk truck is now 
making regular trips down into 
tho Woolper neighborhood, from 
which locality he is getting quite 
a lot of fine cream. 



Thjlt almost prehistoric hotel, 
the Capital, will be missed this 
Winter by those who time out 
of mind have been housed by it 
while the Legislature was in 
session in Frankfort. 



The snow has saved the wheat 
crop the second time already this 
winter, and it ip hoped that this 
part of tho country has had its 
share of severe winter weather for 
the winter of 1917 and 1918. 



Luther Scothorn, of ldlewila, 
never lost a trip to the city 
on account of tho condition of the 
roads the past month. Sometimes 
the pike was a glare of ice . but 
he got there with the machine* all 
tho same. 

Those who receive questionaires 
lose no time in having them pre- 
pared for delivery to the local 
draft board, which is goinj; to 
find it a considerable job to 
classify the men after receiving 
their cards. 



DECEMBER COLD 
WEATHER ROCORDS 

ARE SMASHED 

» 
Nearly Four Weeks of Continu- 
ed Cold With Many Daya 
Recording Below Zero. 



Weather Forcastor W. C. Dever- 
eaux's report of the weather for 
the year 1917, which will be issue J 
soon, will show this year to have 
oeen the coldest on record. ' The 
average temperature, for the year 
will t»e 50.5 degrees. . The next 
coldest year Bince 1871," when the 
recording of weather data was De- 
gun at Cincinnati, was lh85. Tho 
average for that year was 51.7 de- 
grees. 

Tho months of 1017 showing the 
greatest deficiency in temperature 
were May and Decemoer, and the 
average temperature for ootii 
months broke all previous records. 
Tho deficiency for May was 8 de- 
grees and for Decemoer it was 11.8 
degrees. In fhe general summary 
for the weather for 1917 Weather 
Forcast&r Devereaux says: 

"All of tho weather records for 
1917 were made at the A obe Mete- 
orological Observatory, on Lafay- 
ette circle, Cincinnati, O. Up to 
March 31, 1915. the records were 
made at the Government Building, 
or at other buildings in the busi- 
ness section of the city. The tem- 
perature at the Observatory aver 
ages nearly two degrees lower 
than at the Government building, 
and in extreme cases it has been 
as much gas 8 degrees lowen. The 
wind directions and velocities 
have varied considerably at the 
two locations, due to the better 
exposure of the instruments at the 
Observatory, but the rainfalls have 
been nearly the ^ame, except on a 
few days. 

"The year of 1917, on the whole, 
was one of the coldest on recora 



July tho stages were moderate,! Born on the 6th Inst., to Omer 
with a decided rise late in May Portor and wife, a boy— S*( pounds. 
and a small ris°- about the middle' _^ 

£mi JkSESP- 4 A 1 *? 01 ♦ • Btagf \ W !5 L - A ConnCT * i n full control 
maintained at Cincinnati most of of the Sheriff's office at the 
the time from Aug. 3 to Dec. U, but r;mil . t h having enterP(1 

fne river above Cincinnati was too the dutif , s ;,, the \ i?h Sheriff of 
w *w "Ration during Septem Boone county on the first Monday 
ber, October and Nov. except from i n t hi«t mon 'h ^ 

October 20 to Nov. 10, and at other J ' 

times when artificial rises were 
produced to bring down coal 



Tho death of C. E. Clore, pf He%- 
bron, was a great shock to his 
many friends In this part of the 
county. He was pretty generally 
acquainted in many neighborhoods 
in the county. 



fleets. 

"The very cold weather in De- 
cember formed heavy ice in the 
river, and at Cincinnati the river 
was frozen over December 11 to 

shortly after midnight of the Zi-\ ■ 

25. At Fernbank Dam the icci.. 1 ' thr> c0 ^ fcins in this partof 
Wtoppted runnirfr on the early ■**}?. country were in as good con- 
morning to tho 26, due to thej ?, ltvon . as regards, contents as are 
gorge at Medoc Bar, but it con-'*' 10 cisterns, people would be feel i 



$ 



tinued moving slowly at Cincin 
nati on the 26th and 27th and 
until the night of the 28. On 1Jho, 
28th tho gorge between Fernbank 
and the Miami River was from 8 
to 10 feet high in places. 



mg much letter. 



New Years 1918. 



Chicago Tribune. 
\W use New Year's in an eifort 



to perceive tho 



A prolonged drouth- at this sea- 
son is something verv unusual in 
this pari of th.- country. In many 
places water for livestock as well 
as for do mestic purposes haa been 
scarce for several weeks. 



The district composed of Boone,. 
Campb:>ll and Kenton counties, i*i 
the recent Y. M; C. A. Drive ex- 



any- 



acchitecture ofjceedecl its quota more than 
tim>, to give form and finitenessj other district irj, the State J 
to it, and to make life a record both dollars and per cent. 



in volumes which close with their 
mistakes and open with their op- 
portunities. 

We need a ceremony of com- 
pletion and renewed beginnings, a 
sense that life- makes a round, 
and, at its renewals, forgives ana 
allows now effort without the debt 
of past error. 

Tho feeling that' there is a 
strangulatipn in repeated error 
and repeated wrongdoing, that 
their repeated occurrences indi- 
cate our ^certain prospects, is 
broken down by the New Year's 
ceremony of the fresh start. 

If each volume is complete in 
itself, and each one opens with 
opportunities unclondecp by what 
was done wrong before, there is 
a renewal of hope and confidence. 

This hope and confidence, the 



, constituents of healthy optimism, 
at Cincinnati. Th3 temperature dur can. look steadfastly into the as- 
ing thn monchs of January, Febru-|sured misfortunes of tho future 
ary and March averaged nearly 
normal, but here were some quite 
cold periods, followed by unseas- 
onably warm weather. In January 
the temperature was down 



The Baptist church bell and the 
court house bell indulged in ring- 
ing the old year out and the new 
year in, but they did not stay- 
on tho job as long as has here- 
tofore been the custom— too cold. 



Old Sols faca was not of a bright 
character New Years morning. It 
bore a fatigued look as* it appear- 
ed above the eastern horizon, a 
probable result of having spent 
(he night viewing the fields ol 
carnage in the east. 



The B. B. Hume Automobile Co., Agents 

23-25-27 E. Fifth St, Covington, Ky. 
Agents for the following Automobiles* and Truck: 
CHEVROLET, one man top, tire rack, demountable rim, 
a swell car. No hill it will not climb, have sold 102 and 
have contracted for 125 more. There is not a dissatisfied 
customer. 

Chevrolet Baby Grand $ 962. f . o. b. Factory. 

Chevrolet Model 490 $ 671 f . o. b. Factory. 

HUMPMOBILE 1918 MODLE, 
Price $1425, F. O. B, Factory. 

PREMIER, with electric starter, $2250 f. o. b. Detroit 



REPUBLIC TRUCKS 

Modle 9, 3-4 Ton, $ 920. Modle 10, 1 Ton, 91230 Modle, I] $1518 
2 Ton Truck, $19M0, 3h Ton Truck, $2830 f. o. b." 

FREE SERVICE^Hupmobile and Truck is each entitled to 50 hrs. 
fVee service, and the Chevrolet, 40 hours. 

All kind* of Auto Repairs done by the most competent man in Covington. 
A full and complete stock of Auto Accessories. 



zero one one day, and in Febru- 
ary it was below—zero on five 
days, the lowest bein? 9 degrees 
below zero on the 5th. The pre- 
cipitation during those three 
months averaged about, normal, 
and much of it was in the form 
of rain, although there was a 
heavy snowfall on January 13 ana 
moderately heavy falls on March 
2 and 4. Two thunder storms oc- 
curred in January and three in 
February. 

"On March 11 the first well-de 
fined tornado in Cincinnati of 
which there is an authentic re- 
cord occurred during the early 

evening. The tornado passed throned confidence, but 
the eastern suburb or the city, 
known as Sout hHyde Park, orMtf 
Lookout, and tho path was about 
three miles long and from 50' to 
300 feet or more wide. Asa result 
of the storm three persona were 
killed, 32 injured and ninety hous- 
es totally or partly wrecked. 

"The temperatures were, very 
changeable during April with a 

mimimum temperature of 26 de- Thomas Hafer, of Hebron, was 
grees on the 14th. which was fol- among the callers at this office 
lowed four days later by a maxi- one day the past week. Mr Hafer 
mum of 84 degrees. During the last | doos not see anything verv prom 
week of April and the first half ising for this country in the fu- 
of .May thtfre- was a prolonged ture, although he says the worst 
spell of cool weather, and Ugnt ' 
frost formed as late as May 12. 
After the middle oi May the 



without dismay, consternation or 
apprehension. 

For the United States tho vol- 
ume which has been closed is as 
h oa vy wit h er r o r n o any whieh ev~? 
er was closed before it. The one 
which opens is as prophetic of 
assured punishment as any inspir- 
ed document could be. 

As a nation we now meet onr 
mistakes and pay for them, but 
the confidence in the renewed 
start is unbroken and unbreakable. 
The difficulties in the way are 
perceivable. We have clear eyes 
and keen apprehensions. We know 
what, barring unexpected mercy, 
lies before, and are prepared to 
pay toll where toll is demanded. 

It is a harder way than any 
New Year's of this generation has 
opened with the festival of renew- 

it is one 
along which the American people 
will push their progress with 
determination. 



On one page in this issue you 
will find recorded every move of 
importance made in the European 
war during the year 1917, and the 
date thereof. 



The following officers were elect 
ed by Burlington Masonic Lodge 
December 27th : Jesse Kirlcpatrick, 
Master ;H. F, Rouse, Senior War- 
don; Geo. E MeGlasson, Junior 
Warden; N. E Riddell, Secretary; 
A. B Rouse, Treasurer. 



temperatures were moderately 
high for about a week, and then 
followed two months ox cool 
weather. The rainfall foi tho 



may not come for many years. He 
sees plainly the approach of all 
things earthly as foretold in holy 
writings. 



Renewing his subscription W. P 
Dickey, of Boston, Mass., writes: 

"This is to express the wish 
that you and the Recorder may 
find 1918 to your liking. But 
these days call for more N than 
y/iehes, hen'ce the check." 

Mrs. Monette Revill has bought 
©T~"WrP, "Gardner, cashfer ~oT~rh?e 
Etfanger Deposit Bank, his ...nice 
residence property on Common- 
wealth avenue, near the Erlanger 
Baptist church. It will make Mrs 
Revill a nice, comfortable home. 



Th? first reason for having good 
milk cows on the farm comes from 



The local school did not begin 
until last Tuesday on account of 
a bursted water pipe which put 
the furnace out of commission. It | 
required all day Sunday and Mon- 
day to get the furnace repaired 
and the building in condition to 
bo occupied again by the school. 

J. S, Tanner, Mr. and Mrs. Bonar 
and Robert Patrick, of Pt. Pleas- 
ant neighborhood, were among 

LJX3 liCL'OI'tli'r'i 

week. Mr, Tanner crossed the 
river on the ice at Constance that 
morning, went to Cincinnati ana 
from there to Burlington, making 
a business circle that day. 

Mrs. L F- Wolfe, of Walton, 
who had a sale of personal prop- 
erty recently, has moved to Cov- 
ington, to which poBtoffice she 
has directed her Recorder sent in 
the future. Mrs, Wolfe was an old 
citizen of the south end of the 
county, and her many friends are 
sorry to havo her leave them. 



1 REMOVAL * 

* 

<| Atlas Auto Top Company 

^ Now at 15 East Seventh St., C0VIHGT0N, KY. 

<p Tops, Seat Covers, Curtains, Ford Seats $4.75 up. 

yg Write. Phone or Call. Phone S. 3837- 
2c 



No Advance. 



We have purchased a dealers entire stock of Hardware, 
Leather, Etc., which enables us to take care of your 
wants in- repairing of harness at old prices, 
have a 60 per cent Neatsfoot Jet Black 

Harness Oil, at per gallon , 

New and Second Harness at All Prices, 
tt will pay you to visit us and get our prices 




We also 

$1.00 



The ford at Limaburg was in a 
dangerous condition most of the 
time last Sunday on account of the 
creek running out. The ice soon 
disappeared but the volume of wat 
er that was passing down was 
Bwift and deep, although several 
persons took a chance and cross 
ed while others turned back. It 
was about noon when the mail 
reached Burlington, and then it 
came in a buggy, the water in 
the creek being too deep for the 
truck to attempt to make a 
crossing. 



Mr. and Mrs, E. E. Kelly enter, 
fained the young folks ono night i 
during the holidays with an old | 
time candy pulling, the festivities | 
of which occasion was participat- 
ed in by a large number, of 
young people. 

Mrs. Therese McWethy, of Pi:t- 
ersourg,' received a telegram dur-j 
ing tho Jiplidays, announcing the 
death of Iter brother, Harvey Mc- J 
Neely in New Orleans. He had \ 
"been in ill health for. about a year 

,e leaves a very large family. 



ed 30 tu rkey s this year. Thirteen 
of them batched may 11 and Seven 
. j teen hatched June 18. The 30 tur- 
keys were sold and realized Mrs. 
Meeks the neat sum of $94.07 
Profitable turkey hen, that one,. 
Can any turkey raiser in the 
State beat this record ?,— Mt. Ol- 
ivet Tribune-Denjocrat. 



J* 



John Roche, a retired farmer, 
dieH at his homo near Devon, De- 
cember 21st, and. was buried Xmas 
eve at Cold Springs, Campoell-co. 
He was a good neigh oor and will 
be sadly missed. He leaves a 
widow and many friends to mourn 
his death. 

A letter received by Mrs. Ceo 
Blyth from her brother's wife at 
Grand Junction, Colorado, during 
tho holidays, stated thai he" was 
v*ry ill of camper of the htomach, 
consequently his relatives her© are 
vory uneasy about him. He has 
Tbeen a resident of (hand Junction 
Colorado, for many years, 

, — •— — — «^B»— — — 

During the rocnt big snow 
when the roads woro blocked for 
more than u week, many of oui 
ei linens got busy* »i,.: ...penod tho 
roads, whilo others remained in 
their home* and roasted tin n 
s»hin* and did a good <bv«l<>f knock 
in* over the condition ol the 
plies. -Pslinouth Outlook, 



spring and early summer months) the fact that they provide the 
averaged above normal, although ; cheapest best, and most whole- 
there were several long periods 8omo f 00( \ for tha f am u y . T heir 

w i. t iJi_ very Uttle ra, !V rr I value is hard to estimate when we 
"Th? warmest portion of the ; consider the amount saved on the 
summer was from July 23 to Aug- bills. Their produce is a superior 
ust 23rd, when temperature was substitute for many foods neees- 
above 90 degrees- on several days. aar n, y purc h a Bed at high prices. In 
There was very little ram in i Aug- 'fact, there is no economic way of 
ust and September, except on ; doing without plenty of good milk 
one day in September. During the CO ws on the. farm, 
night of September 7-8 there was ^ 

\T?'fI e P Under J t0rTt l' With r f, X "l Mrs. Ernest Meeks, of nearPiqua 
ceesive raui , ir. all portions of the ha8 turbe h > that is ^ a 

££'9^JVw fal l?K UM, r? the nigh ! ! manner worth its weight in gold. 

S'-M-il^Si «m • Government Prom thj h „ * Meek f rai9 

Building and 5.88 inches in 11 \ ^ 30 turk( , VB thia vpa „ Thirt^n 

«ours *t F e rnban k- Dam, 

lower portion of the city 

greatest previous 24 hour 

recorded at Cincinnati in I" years 

was 5.22 inches, on March 12-13, 

1A07. 

"October was cool, and the first 
killing frost of the season occur- 
red on the 9th. Durin.j the first 
21 days of November there were 
only two light sprinkles of rain, 
and th."> month was the dryest No 
vetnber on record at this station. 
Beginning with November 5 there 
was a period of 7 days with 
very dense fog each morning, the 
longest period known in this city. 

"On December 8 a very heavy 
snow fell, which amounted to ti 
inches at the Observatory and 12 
inches at the Government Bui'd- 
ing. These are the greatest 
amounts on record at Cincinnati 
for one day. Following this 
heavy enow' was a week of ex- 
tremely cold weather, when the 
temperature was below zero on 
five days, the lowest being 13 be- 
low on December 11. The lowest 
•previous record for December was 
8 degrees below zero. The heavy 
r,now and very low temperature 
for the week beginning December 
8 made a period of the most 
severe winter conditions on record 
for any month. 

"Th:> stages of the Ohio Kiver 
from the mouth of the Kanawha 
to Cincinnati were favorable for 
navigation during a comparative-' abb 
ly good portion of the yenr. Inlttrs 



The East Bend truck belonging 
to Byle Bros., and a Chevrolet 
touring car belonging - to John 
Conrad, of tho Hopeful neighbor- 
hood, collided on the pike be- 
tween Burlington and Belle view, 
last Monday. Tho Chevrolet was 
badly damaged, one of the front 
wheels and a fender being torn 
off as part of the damage. The 
road was covered with a thick 
coat of ice and the machines could 
not be sleered out of it sufficient 
ly for them to pass without col- 
liding. Neither of the drivers 
was to blame as the collision 
was unavoidable. 



Thomann Harness Store 



S. 3018 



112 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 



Mr, Roosevelt's superabundance 
of patriotism do<;s not prevent 
I ho frequent outcropping of the 

\ nom for the national adminis- : Txr „„„ rt - olxt . v . ^v.,, T Tr.To 
tration ho harbors in his heart. IN THE tKLLK ONL HOIK 



The State Burley Tobacco show- 
will be held this year at thet Col- 
lege of Agriculture, University, at 
Lexington, Jan. 29th to February 1 
Numerous liberal premiums will be 
given, and the grower making the 
highest average Willi bo awardea 
a handsome medal offered by the 
Kentucky Experiment Station. No 
fees will be charged, and all far- 
mers are entitled to enter any or 
all classes, and the tobacco will 
remain the property of the orig- 
inal owner. If tobacco is sent 
by express charges must be pre- 
paid. For further information ad- 
dress T. R, Bryan. Experiment St.i 
tion, Lexington, Ky. 



The ■ 

Woman's Favorite — 

Women bear their full share off 
the dairy work. Anything that ■ 
will make their tasks easier de- 
serves a cordial welcome. A ■ 
woman can tarn 

TMK NEW ■ 

SHARPLES ■ 

sucnoH-peeo 

Separator slow- B 
ly and yet get 

All the cream. ■ 
Any other 
separator H 
will lose cream 
when turned | 
below speed. 
Yo u have g| 
only to tilt a 
pail of milk |g 
into the large, low supply tank. 
39 The simple tubular bowl is very B 
easy to clean — Only three parts, no 

■ ftmy disc* to waih. Conic in and let 
ua auow yuu how it worka, 

m QUIGLEY & BEEM0N, m 
T Limaburg, Ky. H 

SBiB ■-■■■■» 

JOHNS NORTHCUTT 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
402 Coppin Bldg. Covington, Ky. 

Residence— 1017 Madison Avt>. 
Offlio 8. 1719 -Fhones— Residence 4 8. 1216. 




D. E. Castleman, 
A TTORNE Y AT LAW, 

—Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

ErlanSer, - Kentitckv. 



IF YOU WANT A 

CREAM SEPARATOR 

GIVE ME A CALII. 

I handle the United States, a 
first-class Separator. Old Sepa- 
tors taken in trade. 

Thos, Rice. 

Burlington, - Ky. 

sept 28- tf 



RILEY & RILEY 



No otbrr man in ihe United States 
is doing as mut'h as he in an ef- 
fort to weaken the people's con 
iiik v nce in the way the military 
affairs of this country aro being t 
conducted. H» evidently v thinks 
that Theodore Roosevelt Is the 
only man in the United States 
who is capable of properly hand- 
ling thr* reins 01 government at 
i his time. 



It seem* to the Recorder that 
the people who roceive their mail 
at thi> Grant postoffice, this conn 
ty, would havtfe.-ip.uch more satis- 
factory service Wt n* their mail 
received by the way of Burling- 
ton. They would ba served Sa 
early In the day as at present, 
and tlv labor of carrying the mail 
would be lcssenod. to say nothing 
about th > elimination of the dan- 
ger and delay that arc unavoid- 
becauso of having to cross 
river under all oonditions 



January and February tho stflgSS W«rs it DOl that tho mail enr- 
jrenerslly high, but flood ii<-rs at Orant are two of the best 
«tag«* were riot reached. There 
w«h •onv > ice dining tin 1 thlr* 1 
u — k of January and considerable 1 
ice from February 8 to 20. In 

Mvvb tlvt rlvsr \vt>« hi«b. ind 
tu above the flood stage from 
th* H»fr to aoth jtho hlghoat, at 
Cincinnati beinf 56.1 tost on tho 
17. Krnm April until th»» end of 



rlem at Orant are two of the best 
river men in the country Ihener- 
vlce at that office would be <>( 
roratj bul a» it i» JtttMftnnd 
Hsrve Smith, often rltk their lives 
to m*** v of 1 1><> mult. 

Tha Urant poll U by 

th * worst In thla part of the 
■ ob' and ahould b* 



John Rogers, of Belleview, at- 
tempted to cross the creek at I 
Limaburg last Sunday. ami the j 
water killed his engine in mict-rj 
stream, and he and his son s;U 
in tho machine about an hour 
before they were rescued. The 
rear of the machine was turned 
down th© creek but fortunately 
there was not water -enough to 
carry it away. Th?' young man 
climbed out on the radiator and 
pushed the cakes of floating ice 
away from tho machine to prevent 
it being destroyed. Stephenson's 
truck pulled the machine out of 
th;> creek. 

i— 

GIVE US BKTTER T^ AC TIERS. 

The next legislature should cer- 
tainly look after the school affairs 
of th^ state. There has been more 
money wasted in the state the last 
ten years than would - pay off the 
five million dollars f»t.ate debt. 
Give us better teachers and better 
pay.— Ow.:n County Democrat, 



AITORNBYS-AT LAW, 

arid REAL ESTATE.] 

Burlington, Ky. 

Edgar C. Eiley will be iu Burling- 
ton every Monday and Friday. 

~DR. T. E. RANDALL" 

of Petersbury, 

VETENARIAN 

is now ready to answer calls day 
or night. Charges reasonable. 



A FAMILY/ 
MEDICINE 



FOR SALE 

All kinds of farms in Kentucky, 
OLio and Indiana. I have all the 
bargains. See me at the Erlanger 
Deposit Bank. Wm. E. BAIBD, 
sep 18 Erlanger. Ky. 



ALL SKNT OCT. 

Th :* local tlr.iit board his aetu 
out all tho questional! c«, noil If 
th irt if anyone who Is entitled to 
and failed to it, he 

in required to socttrt) ,,(>«■ aim 
have it filled out and return tf 
to tli»» Ic-al bo.ird nt once. 



GEO. B. POWERS 

Real Cstote Agent, 

Fire and Life Insurance 

WALTON, KY. 

Hi'iid for my list of property for mile. (Hve 

uiu your property if you wntit to Mil. 

Ooiumi&.'sioii Low. 



School Attention. 



An ' examinatton for Common 

School Diplomas will be held in Bur- 
liiiKton, Ky., at the Court House, 
January 26th and 26th. All pupils 
and patroiia who ar« lutoroMtud will 
give heed to this. aiinoiiiHieiiient and 
govern themselves accordingly. The 
examination will start the rtret day 
afcl o'oh.ek. J. C. GORDON, 

Hiipttrlnteudaiit. 

' tf ot wlthaUndiog the road a wer© 
a glare of lee last Monday, snout 
tho usual number of person* at- 
tended county court. 



In Her Mother's Home, Says TUs 
Georgia Lady. Regarding Black- 
Draught- Relief From Head- 
ache, Malaria, Chills, Etc 

Ringgold, Ga. — Mrs. Chas. Gaston, 
of this place, writes: "I am a user 
of Thedfords Black-Draught; In fact. 
It wa3 one of our family medicines. 
Also' la my mother's home, when I 
was a child. "When any of as child- 
ren complained of headache, usually 
caused by constipation, she gave as 
a dose of Black-Draught, which would 
rectify the trouble. » Often in the 
Spring, we would have malaria and 
chills, or troubles of this kind, we 
would take Black-Draught pretty reg- 
ular until the liver acted well, and 
we would soon be up and around 
again. We would not be without It, , 
for It certainly has saved ua lots of / 
doctor bills. Just a dose of Black- ( 
Draught when not so well saves a 
lot of days in bed." 

Thedford's Black-Draught has bean 
In use for many years In the treat- 
ment of stomach, liver and bowel 
troubles, and the popularity which it 
now enjoys Is proof of its merit 

If your liver is not doing its duty, 
you will suffer from such disagree- 
able symptoms ss headache, bilious- 
ness, constipation, Indigestion, etc., 
and nnjsss something is done, serious 
trouble may result. 

Thedford's Black-Draught has been 
found a valuable remedy for tosss 
troubles. It la purelv vegetable, and 
acts ftta prompt snd natural war. 
regulating the liver to Its proper 
funeUoas and cleansing tot " 



oriflaal sad ganuisa 



a proper 
bowe ls tf 

it «ft 



Tea* Your Count 1 Pass*** 



mmmmmm 



■MM 



■Mliai 



FJTHTJRSDAY JANUARY 10th. 1318 



BOONB COUNTY RECORDER 



RYERS BREAK ALL 

AERIAL RECORDS 



Allied Aviators Perform Sensa- 
tional Speed and Dis- 
! tance Feats. 



ENLISTS AND LOSES PENSION 



Man Who Served Under Funston 

Makes Sacrifice to Re-Enter 

the Service. 



GO FROM ENGLAND TO ITALY 



•Cadorna's Call for Airplanes and j 



Wc-tfielri. Mhk?.— Bark In the spit- I 
lee again, although sacrificing a pen- j 
stoa tu re-enter it, Fred 1?. Leaoia of 
Westlielrt has boon assigned to the 
J'\\rii(.\ tilth engineers. Lcnms gel led 
two full enlistments with the regulars 
anil did serried in the Philippines and 
Cuba. II" Ml at one tine an orderly 
f«.r the late UaJ. Gon. Frederick Funs- 
ton. 

lie baa triod to enlist at recruiting 
stations several times, hut has been 
turned down because of his permanent 
disability discharge, received as a re- 



THOUGHT BOLLARD 
WAS A 'NON-COM' 

French Poilu Is Effusive in His 

Greeting of American 

General. 



'GLAD TO SEE YOU, OLD CHAP' 



Pilots Is Answered by Great 
Britain and Fr.-nce — Few Ac- 
cidents Are Reported. 

Paris. — So many speed i 
jreeords bate been slrutterod an ! m t 
•and then surpassed again by allied j 
aviators that it If doUBTfUl i ;.; tVesf'1 
performances will ever be straight! a 'i 
out and set down on the n Hi i,ii books, 
Bui aviators have b en flying froxnj 
polnl i in England and in France to. 
the Italian frpnj every day, as :!." i 
k Jiriti>h and French war offices have 
.outdone themsilvi - lii their efforts to 
re-enforeo the French a vial em serv- 
ice. Pilots just brevete d — and there 
were a certain number of Americans 
amonp them — soared Into the air, and 
following the lead of an instructor 
•or some veteran aviator, set their 
'.course for Italy. 

Youths who h;;d not sat in an air- 
plane two months before, duplicated 
ithe feat of Roland Garros which 
startled the world a few years ago; 
the traversing of the Italian Alps. 
Flights of 400, 500 and R00 miles with- 
out stop were common occurrences. 
lAnd In all cases the average speed 
maintained was considerably more 
than 100 miles an hour. 

Asks for Airplanes. 
One of General Ondorna's first re- 
fiuesis to lhe French and British was 
Tor re-enforcements In airplanes and 
Ipilots. The Germans had assembled 
Several score of their best fighting and 
:bombarding eseadrilles on the Italian 
front and had struck suddenly in a 
foody. In one day t he German forma- 



• salt of trouble with one of his ears. 
: N«.i dismal d by repeated failures to 
■ get hack in the service, through Attor- 
! inn II. K. Howard he applied to Wash. 
i tngton for an opportunity to pass a 

physical examination at least, claiming 

thai he was ln*better health than ever. 
Th" permission came, lie passed the 

examii atioh, was assigned for service 

and* lost his pension. 



Democratic Behavior of Officers Con- 
tribute to Popularity of American 
Troops in France — One Inci- 
dent Set Forth. 



FAMOUS RED CRGSS DOG 



tions had practically cleared the aif 
;of Italian fightiug aircraft, rfntl tfiSy 
'followed up this advantage by s nd- 
Ing oyer Into the Italian lines squadron 
jaftor squadron of bombing machines. 
;Incondlary bombs and aerial torpe- 
jdoes were rained on the Italian avia- 
jtlon fields and the hangars and Italian 
aircraft burned together. 
j Both the French and British general 
staffs realized that without its "eyes" 
jtbe Ita'au army might wander into 
[traps and pitfalls. And they gave the 
jorder at once to re-enforce the Italian 
I aviation service with their own es- 
cadrllles. The order went out to all 
the aviation camps and schools In 
England and France. Within a few 
■hours the orders were being executed. 
Pilots having passed their brevets 
[were mustered out on the fields. They 
were told to wear two leather and rub- 
ber union suits Instead of the single 
garment they usually wear. The gaso- 
line tanks were filled and they were 
Instructed to follow the leader. Then 
jthey soared off In long coveys, all 
ibeaded toward the Italian Alps. 

Cover Vast Territory. 
j Some of the British machines went 
j clear across England, traversed the 
^channel, then soared over France and 
'scaled the Alps and proceeded straight 
:0n to the Tagliamento line without 
.ever descending. French machines 
jflew from remote corners of the re- 
public over the great mountain range 
|and across the plains of Lombardy to 
jUdlne, arriving there before the Ital- 
ians were forced to retreat from that 
.'strategic railway center. 

I may not even vaguely indicate the 
inumber of airplanes that were sent 
(from France and England, but I can 
[state that the number of accidents was 
[as low as the average total for a day 
iat any of the big aviation schools. 



Mrs. Leo F. F. Wanner and her 
famed Red Cross dog "Felix," who has 
saved the lives of many French wound- 
ed on the battlefront. 

"Felix" was the center of attraction 
at the police, army and scout dog show 
held at the Madison Square Garden, 
New York. 



RED CROSS SHIPS SUPPLIES 



lASKS STATUES FOR LONDON 



Harvard Professor Would Make Brit- 
ons Familiar With Great 
Americans. 

i 

London. — A plea for the erection of 

imore statues of great Americans in 
London was made here recently by 
Professor Sumlschrast of Harvard, 
'speaking before the American Lunch- 
'eon club. 

j "We who have the chance." he said, 
j "must do all in our power to make 
j England better known to Americans 
I and America and its people better 
[known in England. Any misunder- 
standing that may exist between the 
jtwo countries is purely the result of 
Ignorance of one another. I would have 
; statues of every great American set up 
in London, so that every Englishman 
as he walks through these streets may 
learn to know the features and story 
of Benjamin Franklin, George Wash- 
ington, Abraham Lincoln and many 
others who stood up for liberty and 
made It possible for Great Britain, 
France and the United States to stand 
together today in the battle for human- 
ity." 



Oold Nuggets Worth $1,155. 
Coffee Greek, CaL— Three gold nug- 
gets. With a total valuation of 11,155, 
wees portions of a cleanup made re- 
cently by Patrick Holland In bis placer 
raloe near here. Ono of the nuggets 
was valued at |000, another S4A0 and 
the third $168. Those are the largest 
nuggets found in the county for sev 
fetal years. Ths remainder of (lie 
fjeaaap. which amounted to $000, was 
to small gnt4 several pieces af which 
[weae earned af $0 eaak 



Approximately 33,000 Tons of War Re. 

lief Material Sent Out in Three 

Months, 

Washington.— Ocean carriers, plying 
between American and European ports, 
transported In a period a little over 
three months approximately 33.0OC 
tons of war relief material, shipped by 
the American Red Cross through lt£ 
national clearing house. 

More hospital supplies, anaesthetics, 
surgical dressings and foodstuffs are 
being sent than at any other time since 
America's entrance in the war. 

The widening scope of Red Cross 
work in Europe and the fact that cold 
weather is bringing with it pressing 
needs were responsible for the increas- 
ed shipments. The Red Cross is sup 
plying not only war hospitals but also 
infirmaries, recuperating stations, can- 
teens, dispensaries, homes for nurses 
and the many other things which It es- 
tabllshed in France to help save Amer- 
ican lives and the lives of allied sol- 
diers and civilian sufferers as Well. 



HAVE SNAKE FOR A MASCOT 



Washington Company Will Take It to 

France, If They Are 

Permitted. 



Portland, Ore. — Company G, Second 
Washington state infantry of Aberdeen, 
if allowed to do so will take a mascot 
to France that will raise the hair on 
the heads of the allied troops as well 
as those of the Teutons. The mascot 
is n bullsnake. 

, The snake has been a pet with the 
company outposts In the Cascade 
mountains. One soldier discovered the 
snake In deadly battle with a large 
rattler. It killed the rattler, and a 
few minutes later, when attacked, 
killed a second rattler. The soldiers 
thought its fighting ability should be 
recognised and captured it. 



BUGLER IN BRIG FOR "TAPS" 

Sounded "Good Night" as Transport 

Leaves United States for 

Europe. 



Washington. — As an American trans- 
port carrying United States marines to 
Europe was leaving port, somewhere, 
some time, the mnrlne bugler aboard 
Bounded "Taps," which is the military 
way of saying "Good night." 

Now the commanding officer of the 
transport didn't think It was "Good 
night" for hi* packet and saw no hu- 
mor in the marine bugler's premature 
•4 surrender to the "Ho UkIcs of the 
nee." Nor could the young Men *oldler 
see the point when he was given "three 
days bread uud water" to ponder over 
£<* whsase. 




American Field Headquarters. — 
Nothing has contributed more toward 
the popularity enjoyed by American 
troops in France than the d emo cr at ic 
behavior of their officers. I witnessed 
a delightful sample of this the other 
day in the city in winch Maj. Gen. Rob- 
ert Lee Bullard has his headquarters. 

Privileged to accompany the general to 
a charity performance at the local 
theater, I was standing with him and 
two of his offi cers In the lobby during 
the intermission, when a "Poilu" hove 
into view, 

The Frenchman, who wore medals 
for valor and stripes showing he had 
thrice been wounded, had evidently 
consumed a goodly quantity of his 
country's wine. Afterward we learned 
that it was his first day out of hos- 
pital, and naturally he had celebrated 
a bit. 

"Glad to See You, Old Chap!" 

"Ah, volla des Americalns:' he ex- 
claimed joyously. "I'm Indeed glad to 
sec you old chap!" he went on, shak- 
ing the general's hand vigorously. "It's 
the first time I've met an American, 
though I heard a lot about you in hos- 
pital. , Welcome to France! When are 
you coining into the trenches with us?" 

With- that he plunged into a long 
account of his experiences, delivered 
in very good English, which he said 
he had learned during a trip through 
the United States five years before. 

General Bullard listened smilingly 
and kept right on smiling even when 

t in - Pu tin ■. lny . pn . l l.h ,, n ||-ih?. t ? B r.lj Blu j 

called him his "side partner" and In- 
vited him to have a drink. 

"Another time, thank you very 
much," said the general. 

The soldier strolled off. In two min- 
utes he was back again, but this time 
he drew himself up at attention and 
gave a flourishing salute. 

All's Well That Ends Well. 

"Excuse me, sir," he said, "they tell 
me you're a general. Is that true?" 

"Yes, that's so," General Bullard rer 
.plied, still smiling. 

"Well, then, sir, aU I can say is I 
beg your pardon. I thought you were 
a sergeant, sir, the same as I am. I'm 
not used to your American uniforms." 

"What do you do at the front, ser- 
geant?" the general asked. 

"I'm a machine gunner, sir." 

"And you've been to America?" 

"Yes, sir." 

"Would you like to act as instructor 
to some of our machine gun men?" 

The Poilu was overwhelmed. 

It must be explained that practically 
every man In the French army who 
speaks English has applied for one job 
or another with the Americans. And 
here was an American major general 
whom he had taken for a mere ser- 
geant, inviting htm to do what x hun- 
dreds of French officers are vainly ask- 
ing for ! 

"You bet your life I would," the Poilu 
fairly yelled, again seizing the gen- 
eral's hand. 

"Come to my office tomorrow, then, 
and we'll see about it." 

The Poilu came. 



CONQUEST AND KULTUR 

The Germanizntion of Ameri- 
ca has gone ahead too far to be 
Interrupted. Whoever talks of 
the danger of the Americaniza- 
tion of the Germans now here is 
not well Informed or cherishes 
a false conception of our rela- 
tions. ... In a hundred 
years the American people will 
be conquered by the victorious 
German spirit, so that it will 
present an enormous German 
empire. Whoever does not be- 
lieve this lacks confidence in 
the strength of the German spir- 
it. — Letter of a New York Ger- 
man, Robert Thlem, to the All- 
deutsche Blatter, Sept. 20, 1902. 



Let the Peopl e Know. 

Many things ha«£ U>en learned 
by th;- American people since the 
coming of war, many things about 
themselves. Not the p*ast of 
these in importance and in revel 1 
tion has to do with th?ir limita- 
tions Wo have long been con- 

V . n .1. that * e are « &reat peo- 
ple, the greatest on earth we 
ar« convinced of that still, but 
With reservation. Wo have the 
men, we have the money, we have 
thr» machinery, to make' good our 
faith in ourselves. But the jar of 
tho war car as it has bumped us 
in its advance and retre it/ has 
shown us our weakness in 
strength. 

It is the period of stock tak- 
ing, of easting up accounts, of 
inventorying to the minutest de- 
tail. Th:? invisible line of demarfc - 
ation that separates the years 
into definite divisions of calendar 
periods conduces to musings and 
mathematics. Somehow the exub- 
erance of estimate 11 nv and then 
fikvs a reverse English in an en- 
counter With elncilati m. Fi r UveH 
nearly always show our debts lar 
gar and our credits smaller than 
we had made them in mental cal- 
culation. This certainty of know- 
ledge over conjecture is wholc- 
Bome, but it tend* sometimes to' 
sadness. 

There is psychology, of course, 
in the recurrence of peace propos 
als at Christmas time. It equally, 
of course, miy be psychology of 
selections as o; sentiment in the 
making. Th> discriminating recip- 
ient of the proposal is apt to 
have this in mind in Weighing it 
with a view to a fixing of values. 
But always the suggestion of any 
sort of settlement of difference 
precipitates talk. So just now, as 
just at this time a year ago, 
and again two years' ago, the 
P«*ce dove coos. But now, as then, 
the- soothing sound is drowned in 
the war eagle's scream. 

Looking backward is not to be 
overindulged. Just a glance to 
get the gage for the forward 
going is all sufficient. We did not 
credit the possibility of the wir 
involving us until its tolls were 
all about us. Wo were .caught quite- — 
unawares. Not that we were not 
abundantly warned, but that in 
the consciousness Of our greatness 
warnings eavo-ns small concern. 
That is a aetaff having place here 
merely as a marker of direction. 
Being in we became at once, and 
properly alert and aggressive 
pr e p a i .tt 'iort- . Wo 



Dibowski's Cafe 




THAT- 



I 



Neat Little Place 

For Fanner. Workman, Merchant, Clerk I 

and Professional Man. 

Commercial Luncheon from II a m. to 1:30 p. 

m. Supper 5 to 7 p. m. 

No. 6 Pike Street, - • Covington,Kentuo ky. 




;better sight 

Makes the world brighter. Many peo- 
ple go through life with poor vision, 
with only a few dollars would make 
them see' perfectly. Don't do it— it 
pays to take care of your eyes. 
Phone South 1746 

r^"0 TVT ■7' lD"l7XTTVT WITH MUTCH, Jimrnt. 

±J1\j. XH . T • JtJCjIM Jj| ,613 Madison Ave. - Covington, Ky 



PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

Undertaker & Embalmer 

Magnificent Horse Drawn 
or 

Automobile Equipment 

Calls Answered Promptly in'Auto at all Hours. 



Luxurant Ambulance 

at 

Your Command 



Phones '"AY- BRLANQKK 87 

1 HONES (Jfi anT _ , 5S [ 

ERLANGER, KY. 




C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

WALTON. KY, 



in 



LEVEL FAMOUS CANTON WALL 



Thousand-Vear-Old Landmark 
China Gives Way to Modern 
Trolley Line. 



in 



San Francisco. — The thousand-year- 
old walls of Canton, China, which 
withheld many an onslaught of Tar- 
tar brigands, are being torn down to 
make way for a trolley line. 

The Chinese are substituting the 
American bathtub for the usual dip in 
the river. 

This Information was brought to this 
country by Oeu. Chiang Tln« Tsu of 
the Chinese army, who Is In the United 
Rtates to Inform the war department 
of the extent to which Chlnu Intends 
to opemW; agnlnst Germany. 

General ('blame rays that the »ur- 
vey for the roftd. before. Which iln an- 

eii-iit canton wayj are eruoihUiiA has 
already been completed, it win be 
I bell ■yaten nod witl follow the Uue 
N ralch the wni, i ected 



sang war, wr* preached war, we 
coined war money arfd we offered 
war sacrifice. And this we have 
done cheerfully and most confi- 
dently. 

So far so good. Made to fight, 
we were of a mind to make a 
finish of it. To that end have we 
moved, howbeit on the lrrht of 
recent developments it would ap- 
pear far more slowly than we 
thought. We were not alone buoy- 
ed up by hope, we wera cock- 
sure and confident; not bombas'i- 
cally as had some time been our 
won't but calmly and with the as- 
surance of action. And so we have 
gone forward, ever with the very 
best, responsiveness on the part 
of the people, if not altogether 
of the government as a govern- 
ment. There have been mistakes 
and there have been delays, but 
the flower of the nation's young 
men are engaged in the solemn 
adventure, in various stages of 

training and various- d e grees a~£ 

equipment from the weighing in 
at the recruiting station and the 
return of the questionaire, thru 
training camp, and cantonment, to 
the fip-hfing edge of the battle 
front "somewhere in France." 

Is it tho psychology of the sea- 
son reacting to the suggestion of 
peace, coming coincidentally with 
somo revelations of inefficiency at 
tho scat of government, and some 
further revelations of relative 
strength and weakness among the 
contenders "over there, 1 ' that has 
brought inCo our stocktaking for 
the new year a' bit of disappoint 
mont over the balance sheet and 
a bit 61 depression in the pres- 
ence of the statistical exposition 
of the task ahead? Is it a swing 
of th?> pendulum back from con- 
fidence to conjecture? Unques- 
tionably many hearts hope that 
somewhere, somehow, not too fir 
ahead, and with not greater sac- 
rifice than need be, some Work- 
ing base where peace may be 
brought out shall be found. Anct 
the Christmas spirit," breathing 
peace and good will, yet lingers. 

That is all. It is a phase that 
will not tarry in its passing. There 
is no discouragement, no doubt of 
the ultimate. Just a wish that all 
might soon b* well. There is re- 
gret that in any wtfy, at any 
point, there has been lack of the 
j best possible effort and the great- 
est possible progress. But with 
that regret there is just as man- 
I ifest a renewal of determination 
; and a reaffirmation of purpose 
to put all things to i)v issue 
with an abiding faith of conquest. 
ThM-e is this difference in the 
attitude of the people who have 
with a rara confidence and a rich 
outpouring of substance and of 
Service responded to every call 
of the colors. "Whereas they have 
up to now been willing, as a war 
measure if not content in personal 
satisfaction, to take their vision 
of conditions thru a glass darkly, 
they are now disposed to desire 
earnestly that hereafter they be 
shown fully and frankly just what 
confronts them. 

And why not? The greater the 
task ahead the greater will be the 
IM'ople's courage and determina- 
tion, with^ knowledge, and, most 
important of a\L thf> greater will 
be their effort to bring to bear 
all the energy and resources io 
make sure, and, as speedily us 
possible, the communication so 
devoutly to be wished— dellver- 
anea from the menace of this mnn 
ster of war— permanent de'iver- 
aiiee. Nor will they lack patience 
to take the ttmr needed for prop 
er preparation and effective ac- 
tion, however groat ho the ttjei- 
raqolred in men, money ana 
■ union service, over horn ind 
over there. -Commercial Tribune 




Undertaker - Embalmer 

Jft»8t 6la»8 equipment.^ 

Calls Answered Promptly In Automobile Dav or Night. 

Holds License in Three States— Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky. 

Huto Rcarec and Outfit furnished if Slanted. 
Telephone No. 30, Walton, Ky. 



J. L. HAMILTON 

UNDERTAKER 

Verona. - - Kentucky. 

All of the Up-to-Dato methods and 
reosonable charges. Fine line 
of Monument Work. 
Telephone— Calls answered prompt- 
ly, day or night. 

Phone South 871. 

J. W. RUSSELL BRADFORD 

Attorney- aT-Law, 

o02-501 Coppin Bldg. Covington, Ky. 

Will practice in all the courts. 
With O. M. Ro gers 

DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

^i&.DENTIST-i^ 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION 

Notice is hereby given that the 
Big Bone Springs Hotel and Wa- 
ter Company, Incorporated, is clos- 
ing its business and winding up its 

ft iTfllFK 

C. L. BONIFIELD, President. 
T. A. Nolan, Secretary. 



I Can Sell The Earth. 

List your farm with me.,. Give me 
a trial— just write description and 
number of acres and mail it to 

Wm. E. BAIRD, Erlanger, Ky. 
Erlanger Deposit Bank Bldg. s'l8 

DR.W.E.FISTER, 

Veterinarian, 

WALTON, KY. 

Calls by telephone answered night 
or day. 'Phone 29. 



Another thing to remember Is that 
a 25-ccnt package of tobacco will not 
Inst a soldier any longer than It will 
a civilian smoker. 



COAL 

The Famous 
Raymond City Coal 

Once Tried Alwas Used, 
Is Kept on hand constan- 

Prices the Lowest 

Give Ua Your Coal Order. 

Ox Brand Fertilizer, made 
by Tennessee Chemical Co. 
We handle all grades. 

Petersburg Coal Co 

Petersburg, Ky. 



F. W. Kassebauni & Son, 

«R ANITE & MARBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large 8toeh on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipment 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 



i 



Throe-cent postage seems easy, com- 
pared to the three or four hundred per 
cent Increase la the cost of sows oth- 
er nsessslHos. 



Take Your County Paper. 



Executor's Notice. 

All persons indebted to the estate 
of E. T Krutz, deceased, inustcoaae 
forward and settle same, those hav- 
ing claims against said estate must 
present them to the undersigned 
proven according to law. 

Mrs. C. E. KIUJTZ, Executrix. 
Riley A Riley. Attys. 



Boone Co. farms Wanted. 

-♦-— — 

List your farms iarire or small 
with me, and get a quick sale. 
J. W. TALIFERRO, 

Erlaofcr, Ky. 



I 



>l 






sssssseass^a 




— L 



BOONE CvCJNTY RECORDER 



VA 



p 



EVENTS OF WORLD 




United States Joins Ranks of the 
Foes of Germany. 



Mil 



d with 



by 



SENDS BIG ARMY TO FRANCE 



Russia Ousts Czar, Becomes Republic 
and Falls Into Hands of Teuton- 
Led Radicals — Allies Smash 
Hindenburg Line, and 
Austro-Cermans In- 
vade Italy. 

._ Compiled by E. W. PICKARD. 

January. 

-Germans deflated Russian* in 



hi 



Jan. 1.- 
Wallaehia 

British transport Ivernia sunk in Mccli 
turranenn: l*o Inst. 

Jin. G. — Braila, Roumania, captured 
Teutons. 

Jan. 9 — Premier Trcpofr of Russia re. 
ElKtvea mul whs BUvceued by Prince Golit- 
zinc 

British warship Cornwallls sunk by tor. 

pciU.. 

Jan. II- Japanese battleship Tsukuba 
destroyer] by explosion; 15" killed. 

*rn. 17.— German raider in South Atlan- 
tic^ said to have sunk 15 or. more sMps. 

Entente allies sent another note to U. 

i. explalnl " B why P eilc * Is not possible 



Savy, Ven- 



coast ; 
addn 



i:> 



evacuated Braila, 
ory near London 



ydt_ 

Jan. 18.— Germans 
Roumania. 

Jan. l!).-Munlllons fa 
blown up: many lives le 

Jan. 22.- -President Wilson, addressing 
senate, gave world outline of terms on 
which he believed lasting peaee could be 
concluded. 

Germans defeated In two attacks at 
, Vordun. 

Jan. 23.— Destroyers fought two engage- 
ments in North sea, the Germans loaing 
several vessels and the English one. 

Jan. 24.— Germans made gains In fierce 
-attacks west of Riga. 

Jan. 25. -Germans took mile of French 
tranches on Hill 304, Verdun reqiun. 

British auxiliary cruiser Laurentic sunk 
by mine; 3D«J lives lost. 

French transport Admiral Macon tor- 
pedoed: 141 lost. 

Jan. 27.- -Allies attacked Teutons on all 
fronts, gaining much ground. 

Jan. 29.— Greek government saluted Hags 
of entente powers. 

»-ttlBh cruiser Amethyst fought Ger- 
.-' commerce raider and submarine 
norfh of Pernambueo. ' 

.WiTi. Si.— Germany announced submarine 
blockade of all enemy countries, outlined 
fnetudden zones and revoked ptedgca on 
suUfruurine warfare 



February. 



FVb. 1 -Nine vessels sunk bv Germans 
li> "blockade zone;" eight lives tost. 

Feb. 2.— Nine more neutral vessels sunk 
by German aubmarimw, with loss of Ufa. 
Feb. 2— United States broke off diplo- 
matic relations with Germany: President 
Wtlsnn dismissed Ambassador von Bern- 
storff and recalled Ambassador Gerard. 

British captured 300 yards of German 
trenches north of the Ancre. 

K&b. 4.— Germany agreed to release 
Americans taken by commerce raider. 

German gunboat interned at Honolulu 
hurned by crew: many German vessels In 
American ports damaged, 

Feb. fi.— German submarine shelled and 
sank British provisional naval collier 
Eovestone and killed four men. Including 
Richard Wallace, American. 

•President Wilson Issued proclamation 
'forbidding American shipowners to trans- 
fer their ships to foreign registry. 

British reported big gains on west front 
•and near Kut-el-Amara. 

Belgian relief steamer Lars Kruse sunk 
by German submarine; all but one of crew 
lost 

Feb. «.— Thirteen vessels sunk by German 
[Submarines, with heaw loss of life. 

Feb. 7.— Anchor liner California and oth- 
kr-vessels sunk by German submarine: 41 
lost, on California. 

Senate Indorsed President WIlson'B ac- 
tion toward Germany 

' 'Fob. 8.— British steamer Turino and nine 
o*fr vessels sunk by Germans. 
' British torpedo destroyer sunk by mine; 
mirrry lives lost. 

Feb. 10.— Ambassador Gerard left Ger- 
many. 

' Germany, through Swiss minister, in- 
formally proposed parley with II. S, 

Feb. 12.— President Wilson refused parley 
,30tucht by Germany. 

American schooner tymtin M. Law de- 
stroyed by Austrian submarine. 

Fob. 13.— Germany announced period of 
graon for all vessels in "barred zones" 
had expired. 

■White Star liner Afrlc sunk by subma- 
rine. 

F«h, IK.— Germans opened new offen- 
sive? in Champagne. 

Keb. 16.— Great Britain announced clos 
Ing of Germany's North sea coast to ship 



drive at Verdun, but werft repul 
• normoiiB losses. 

Klhot formed new French cabinet 

Man-h 20-Fretich battleship sonic 
German submarine in Mediterranean 

March 21.— British took forty more towns 
In France. 

American steamer Healdton sunk with- 
out warning by German submarine; 21 of 
crew killed. 

March 24. -Russians took Kerlnd. Par- 
sin. 

March 26.— French occupied Fnlembr.iy 
and La Feulllee, south of Coucy forest 

British captured Lagnicourt. 

Marc* 28.— New Russian government In- 
stalled. 

March 30.-Brltlsh eapturcd villages of 
Ruyahuurt. fion-l-le-Grand and Kins and 
Kalned ground near Heudlcourt 

April. 

April 1.— British captured 
dellea, Epehy and Pelzlere. 

and re Laffaux Ched ouuklrts of Vattxaillon 
Armed American ship Aztc- sunk bv 
German submaiuio off Frent-n 
of crew saved. 

«™ prl ! ! -f r «^dent Wilson, ad. 

resoh. {ion' 6 ?!"'} °( , on «'««. Mked^Ca* 

resolution that state ot war was in evis- 

nu'ny ^aXcalleS ^ ™"j™*qS£. 

tntenie antes ^defeat ttS 1 "™**" mu> 

A..-II a if. l wonwui autocracy. 

April 3,-L'nfted Blates and entente , '- 
floiato arrange confureju* (™ 

a x * '- ,llil |(, 'i for one day 

lMa*eA~2*®~" ' ,; ' s '' resolution derlar- 
in,, state oi war between U 
many, by u vote of 88 t.. ti. 

Germans fui, ed 
river in Volhynla. 

April C— House' passed '. 
by vote of 373 to fcr 

'" >U ^.^, ,^.^ a Proclamation to 
and ordered navy mobilized it 
AH German vessels in America \ 

wS^-SSf HelZed and ma "y suppoJed fir- 
man plotters were arrested. 

April ".—German cruiser Cormonn 

interned at Guam, blown up by ere!? ' 

wSSaSSS^"* deLlared stat0 " L *** 

leiL- M'awtsssy^ every wire - 

April 8.-Austrla bloke off diplomatic 
relations with US ' umauc 

April 9.-Brltish advanced two to three 
miles on twelve mile front near Arris 
smashing German line and taking V i nv 
ridge and many towns. ' Vlrny 

American steamer Seward sunk in Medi- 
terranean by German submarine 

arm e v e <T al i munitlons boaid for American 
army and navy created. 

April lO.-Brazil severed relations with 
Germany: Argentina declared it supponed 
the position of the United States Clil 
derided to remain neutral. ov,lleB ' *- mu 

A?ras madC * further bi S Sains east of 

tJXZS .l 1 " 00 ?'" nica declared It sup- 
ported tho p<)Kitlon of the United Staica 
Uruguay proclaimed Its neutrality 

V\, S - ? e,,a '*' passed araiy""b711 aDnro- 
prlating ?2S1.136,49fi. -ippro 

April 12-Brltlsh naval men met in llrst 
W as nln^on?" WlU ' S S ' otn ^* " 

for'n J ra l uf;n rt orwLr. C4iIled f ° r volunt ^« 

Bulgaria severed relations with TJ S 
Germany ° liVU severed ^'J"0M with 

British and Frond, made further bis ad- 
vances o,i west front. 

April 14.— House paeeed t7.ono.ooo,noo war 
revenue authorization bill without dissent- 
ing vote. 



world 
once. 



S. and Gor- 



croming of stokhod 



Presiucnt Wilson 



Busslan cabinet, reconstructed, Mllnkoff 
retiring. 

May 17.— Senate passed army draft bill. 

British cornr.leted capture of Bullecourt. 

Italians i a plur»d Luioo, 12 miles nort v i 
Of Tri. 

May is— President Wilson ordered one 
division, commanded by General Pershing, 
sent to Fran'-e at once. He also signed 
the army draft bill and set June u for 
registration day, 

Honduras Mvered relations with Ger- 
many. 

May 19.-Prcsident Wilson selected H. 
C. Hoover as head of a food control board. 

Nicaragua severed relations with Ger- 
many. 

Senato passed the J3,342,OOO,000 war bud- 
get. 

May 20.— British renewed attacks near 
Bullecourt, winning a mile front. 

Austrian* began counter offensive in the 
Trentino. 

May 21.— Two Chicago nurses on wav to 
France killed at sea by fragments of sneli 
during gun practice, 

May 22.— State depart men t protested to 
Germany against the detention of Ameri- 
can citizens. 

May 23.— House passed war tax bill car- 
ry in« tl,870,000,OUO. 

Secretary Lansing refused pasapotta for 
American delegates to Stockholm social- 
ist peace eouinei.ee. 

American ship carrying supplies to 
Switzerland' sunk by torpedo. 

Premier Tlaza and entire Hungarian 
cabinet resigned, 

Premier U'uun Chi Jul of China dis- 
missed, 

May 24.— Italians broke through Austrian 
rront from i:.is:n«i.a. izza U> Gulf of 
1 ii'.ste. taking '.<:'." prisoners. 

German aTrshlps raided eastern counties 
of Lngland. 

May 26— First American field ser. : :i 
V ~ ' .cent In France. 

Germans made air raid on southeastern 
England, killing Ttl and injuring 17H. 

Ma y i ff .— t tuliaiw mjaln -bT0K6 llirg ggy 
Austrian lines. 

Chlng-Hsi made premier of China. 

May 28.— Plots to defeat the conscription 
law thwarted by arrests In several states. 

Italians captured San Giovanni and Aus- 
trlans ordered non-combatants to leave 
Trieste. 

Food survey bill passed by house of rep- 
resentatives. 

•May 29.— War department issued call for 
300.000 volunteers for regular army. 

London reported sinking of hospital ship 
and armed cruiser by submarines. 

Brazil chamber of deputies authorized 
revocation of neutrality decree. , 

May 31— President Wilson sent note to 
Russia telling America's war alms. , 

Brazil senate authorized alliance with 
other states "to defend the American re- 
publics." 



THURSDAY JANUARY 10th, tflff 



July ll.-Presldent Wilson callcl on 
American business interests to aid nation 
by forerroing unusual prodta in selling to 
the nation and the public. 

Russians captured Kalut-z, headquarters 
of Teuton army In Gallcia, 

July 12.-- Russian advance checked west 
Of Uohorodozany. 

July 14. —Chancellor Bethmann-TTollwee 
resigned and Dr. O. E. Mlchaelis succeed- 
ed him. 

House passed »640,000,000 aviation bin. 

July IB.— French took important hill po- 
sitions from Germans west of Brims. 

July lfi.— Russians took Ixidziany from 
Austrlans. but evacuated Kalusz. 

July 17— French took German trenches 
near Malancourt. 

Three members Of Russian cabinet re- 
signed; riots In Petrograd suppressed. 

Shake-up In British cabinet. 

July 19— Great German attack between 
Crnonne and Hnrteblse partly successful. 

r iianee]M r Michaells declared himself 
for the submarine warfare. 

Finland diet adopted independence bill. 

In Viigna region Germans drove back 
Russians because some Russian regiments 
held meetings to decide whether to obey 
orders. 



for American National 



July 20.— Draff 
a prenu'r fl 'l.ycff of Russia resigned ^h.^u^^lX ^1*°* " ne " Min " 



retreat. 



was sie seeded by Kerensky. 

Germany call :d" 2.009,000 01 her youngest 
men to the • olortt, 

July 21.— Senate passed food control and 
aviation Bills. 

Russian troops in disorderly 
burning villages, 

July 22.— German aviators raided Eng- 
land, killing 11 la coast towns, but being 
driven away fre:n London. 

Siarn declared state of war with Gcr- 
KK-:,: .r,d Austria-Uungan-. 

Russians burned and evacuated Tarno- 
poi. 

July 2 3.— Govern ment of n^tlnn-it -^fety 
erei*leil m Russia and Kerensky given ab- 



Aug. 29. -Auitrians (led from Monte Kan 
Gabriele. 

Aug. 30.— U. S. wheat committee fixed 
basic pri^e tor 1917 crop'at Ji20. 

Germans made air raid on port of 
Riga. 

Aug. 31 —French made successful attack 
northwest of Hurtebise. 

September. 

Sept. 1— British destroyers destroyed 
four German armed trawlers off Jutland. 

Sept. 3.— Russians abandoned Rigi. 

German airplanes raided Chatham, Eng- 
land, killing 1«T ft 

Sept. 4.— Italians captured Mor.te San 
Gabriele. 

German submarine shelled Scarborough 
and airplanes bombed London. 

Sept. 5.— American National army began 
movement to cantonments. 

Federal agents raided I. W. W. quar- 
ters throughout country. 

Organized labor met In Minneapolis to 
form loyal organization. 

American merchantmen under ronvov 
attacked by U-boats; two steamships and 
one submarine sunk. 

Sept 6.— House passed war credits bill 
authorizing |ll,:,:!S>t3,4<» in bonds and cer- 
tificates. 



Oct. 23. -French broke through Oemta 
lines north of toe Aisne. Inflicting heavy 
losses and taking 8,000 prisoners. 

American troops went into first Una 
trrn. hes an 1 fired first *hot at Germane 

irians and Germans began 
'» ive along Isonzo front. 

. ^kt. 2.-,.— i renrh made another bbr gain 
in Aisne sector. 

erman attack drove Italians 

bark *o frontier oil the Julian line fosc- 

abandonment of Bainslzza plateau; 

II titans captured. v—«- . 

•)< t. 21 —British and French made big »U 
taek e as t of 7pres. 

Brazil declared state of war with Ger- 
many existed. 

Italian cabinet resigned 

Oct. 27 -Italians in eeneral retreat. TOO 000 
captured; Teutons advanced beyond Clvt- 
dulc. 

French and P.e| eInn , raptured Merckem 
peninsula south of Dixmucle. 



ptwg by mine field. 

Fob. 17.— British smashed German lines 
on both sides of Ancre river. 

XX. 8. sent peremptory demand to Ger- 
many for release of Ynrrowdale prisoners, 
(jjermnn submarine sank Italian trans- 
,pert: 998 lives lost. 

i Feb. 22.— Germany freed the Yarrowdale 
prisoners. 

Fab. 24.— Holland aroused by sinking o< 

1 7 I'Hrtch steamers by German submarines. 

Germans In Somme region retreated on 

^IHA front, abandoning five towns. 

i Feb. 26.— German submarine sunk Cunar- 

der Laconla off Irish coast: 12 lost, lnclud- 

I hjhMrs. A. RHoy andLdnugh ter oLJChl- 

:cagn, and One American member of crew. 

■RTftlsh and German destroyers fought In 

[English Channel. 

Peb. 28.— President Wilson asked rnn- 
igress to grant him powers to protect 
(American shipping. 

British took Kut-el-Amara from Turks. 
! German destroyers bombarded Broad - 
swlrH and Margate, killing woman and 
chUfl- 

^eb. 27.— President Wilson declared La- 
conla case was an "overt act." 
> Feb. 28.— U. S. government revealed 
German plot to join with Mexico and 
Japan In making war op United States-. 

British occupied Gommecourt and other 
■ylllages In Ancre region, 
i French destroyer Casslnl torpedoed; VH 



March. 



pro- 



Marrh 1.— House passed bill empowering 
president to arm American merchant ves- 
: sols. , 

March 2.— Germany announced all ves- 
iSels would be sunk hereafter without 
I warning. 

March 3.— Russia reported capture of 
1 Htrmadan, Persia, from Turks. 

March 4.— Austrian attack east of Gorltz 
repulsed with great losses. 

March 8.— Austria Informed IT. S. It In- 
dorsed German submarine warfare 

am. 

lerman-Hlndoo plot to Invade India 
through China revealed by arrests In New 

March 9.— President Wilson ordered the 
arming of U. 8. merchant vessels. 

March 11.— Bagdad raptured by British. 

•larch 12.— Revolution begun In Pctro- 
Iflprnd. 

! Germans abandoned main defensive sys- 
tem east of Bapaume. 

American steamer Algonquin torpedoed 
'Without warning. 

March 13— China severed diplomatic re- 
lailons with Germany. 
_ Ru ssian imperial cabinet deposed by 
dumn. 

J March 14.— Germans in great retreat 
along SomniB front. 

March IS.- Caar Nicholas abdicated Rus- 
sian throne for himself and his sun. 

Russians captured Hamadan, Asiatic 
I Turkey. 

March 17. -British took Bapaume and 
freneh took Hoyn 

I 7<<p|iellns raided London; one shot down 
near Compiegne, France, 

hi land cabinet In France reslf ned 

ttai-h 11 AtuorUan freighters Vlgllan- 






City of Memphis and Illliutla, sunk by 
man submarine, tt perished, 
ritlau ami French advanced 10 miles on 
~9«Vaall« front and took Paronne, Chaulaea 

, Marek tt-Oersaaae made ne,w deree 



of 1 Lens U '' _1 '' l ' Uh ,Sat^o,8 «»tere<! suburbs 

Germans routed at Lagnicourt with ter- 
ribje losses. 

President Wilson lssue>l address to na- 
Uon ,i : . n l UnK for flJ ». united service 

British transport Arcadian torpedoed; 
- 1 .' Inst. 

British transport Cameronla, sunk; 140 

April 16-PresIdent Wilson Issued proc- 
lamation warning againts the commission 
of treasonable acts. 

Congress appropriated $100,000,000 for 
emergency war fund. 

French opened great offensive on 25- 
milo front between 3oissons and Reims, 
taking lfl.OOO prisoners. 

French liner Sontay torpedoed; 45 lives 
lost. . 

April 17.— Senate unanimously passed J7 - 
000,000.000 bond Issue bill. 

Germans sank two British hospital ships 
loaded with wounded British and Ger- 
mans. 

April 18.— French hit Germans hard be- 
tween Reims and Auberlve and repelled 
great counter-attacks. 

April 19.— American liner Mongolia sank 
German submarine in Irish .sea. 

French took strong positions near 
Craonne. 

Nicaragua indorsed course of Unltod 
States. 

April 20 — Rus sian council of workmen's 

and soldiers' delegates declared against 

separate peace. 

Two German destroyers sunk off Hover. 

April 21— Brlllsh war commission arrived 

In United States. 

Turkey severed relations with United 
States. 

German destroyers shelled Calais., kill- 
ing civilians. 

April 22.— British resumed grand offen- 
sive on west front. 

April 23.-Brltlsh airmen destroVed 40 
Oermnn airplanes. 

April 24.— French war commission ar- 
rl'-ed in United States. 

British made further advances In Arras 
sector In face of desperate opposition bv 
Germans. 

April 25.— German destroyers bombarded 
Dunkirk but were driven off. 

April 26.— German destroyers shelled 
Ram'sgate. 

American tanker Vacuum sunk by sub- 
marine; naval lieutenant and 9 gunners 
lost. 

April 27.— British occupied Arleaux and 
-half of Oppy. 

April 2S— Congress passed army bills 
with selective conscription features. 

Guatemala severed relations with Ger- 
many. 

April 29— General Petain mado chief of 
French staff. 

April 80.— Senate authorized president to 

use Interned German and Austrian boats 

at once. 

Series of air attacks made on Zeebrucge. 

American armed steamer Rockingham 

sunk by submarine; 16 mtssing. 

Greek steamship Parthenon sunk by 
Oerman submarine: loss $4,000,000. 

May. 

May 2.— Dr. Lauro Mueller. Brazilian 
foreign minister and pro-German, re- 
signed. 

May 3.— Chilean minister to Germany 
demanded his passports. 

British began new offensive west of 
Queant and took Fresnoy. t 

XT. S. and Canada agreed to regulate 
price of wheat. 
May 4. — French captured Craonne. 

House passed espionage hill with modi- 
fied press censorship clause. 

British transport Transylvania torpe- 
doed; 413 llv«>8 lost. 

May 5.— French made big adance on four 
mile front southwest of Laon. 

May B.— Bolivia severed relations with 
Germany. 

Mass meeting at Salonlkl proclaimed 
deposition of king of Greece and his dy- 
nasty. 

May 7.— Coalition government of provi- 
sional government and soldiers' and work- 
men's delegates formed in Russia. 

May 8.— Germans recaptured Fresnoy 
from British. 

Allies began offensive on Macedonian 
front 

May 9.— British regained part of ground 
lost at Fresnoy. 

May 10.— Army bill conferees fixed ago 
for conscripts at 21 to 80. 

May Hi— Italy reported destruction of 13 
German submarines in one week. 

Chicago board of trade stopped trading 
In May wheat. 1 

May 12-Brltlsh again hit the Hinden- 
burg line, establishing themselves near 
Bullecourt. 

May 13.— British took most of Bullecourt 
and part of ftoeux. 

May 14.— Senate passed esplonngc bills 
without prohibition und press censorship 
clauses. 

President ordered army brought to full 
war strength of 293,000. 

Officers' training camps opened 

Italians attacked along the whole Uonzo 
front, gaining ground north of Gorlti. 

May IB. -Chancelor Hollweg before- the 
ftclchstag refused to discuss Germany'* 

peace alms. 

Trading In wheat futures Hopped In alt 
middle west exchanges. 

Italians made big veins on Julian front, 
taktne Moms Cucco and Monte Vod> 

May 16 llrlllah raDulaed terrific alta< ke 
near Oavrella end around Bulleeuurt. Ger- 
mans suffering heavy los s es. 

British admiralty announced 



prmah admiralty announced arrival of 

Kuadror. if Aaterto*a eWtroysre la &*• 
h waters. 



June. 

June 1.— Russian soldiers assumed con- 
trol of fortress of Kronstadt. 

Three Chinese provinces declared their 
Independence because of pro-German pol- 
icy of the government at Peking. 

June 2.— Senate -passed first ol admin- 
istration's food hills. 

Fourteen German and Hindoo plotters 
indicted by federal grand jury at Chicago. 

U. S. railroad commission to Russia ar- 
rived at Vladivostok. 

June 3.— American commission to Rus- 
sia, headed by Root, reached Russian port. 

French repulsed five great attacks sou.t>> 

Ot I.'ofl. 

June 4.— Brusslloff made commander in 
chief of Russian armiis. 

June 5.— More than ten million young 
Americans registered for the National 
army. 

Bril l ni t- so u t< d r< >n 
sank German destroyer. 

German aviators raided naval base In 
the Medway near l.ondon, but were driven 
off. losing eight machines. 

British made big advance on north bank 
of the Scarpe. 

American liner sank German submarine 
after long fight. 

June 7.— British began great offensive in 
Belgium, blowing up Meslncs ridge and 
advancing 6 miles on -9-mlle front, 
straightening out big salient. 

Naval collier Jupiter laden with sup- 
plies for Pershing's army and escorted by 
Amerlenn warships arrived at France. 

Kronstadt rebels submitted to Russian 
provisional government. 

June 8.— General Pershing and staff ar- 
rived in England. 
Germany broke off relations with Haiti. 
June 10— General Pershing's staff ar- 
rived In France. 

Heavy fighting renewed In the Trentino, 
Italians making gains. 

June 12.— King Constantino of Greece, 
forced by the allies, abdicated in favor of 
Prince Alexander, his second son. 

British advanced on twe mile front be- 
yond Messlnes, taking Gaspard. 

American steamship Petrollte reported 
sunk by submarine. 

June 13.— Germans made air raid on Lon- 
don, killing 97 and wounding 437. 

Army and navy deflclencv appropriation 
bill carrying $3,00O,0Ot\00O passed by con- 
gress. 

Prince Alexander took oath as king of 
Greece. 

June 14.— British mado big advance east 
and south of Messines. 

June 15. --.Liberty loan heavily over-sub- 
scribed when books closed. 

Count Estcrhnzy formed coalition cabi- 
net for Hungary. 

President Wilson signed $3,000,000,000 war 
budget and espionage hills. 

June 16.— Russian council of workmen 
and soldiers declared Itself against sepa- 
rate peace and expelled Robert Grimm. 
Swiss socialist, for bearing German offer 
of peace. 

American oil steamer John D. Archbold 
sunk by submarine; R lost, 

June 17.— Russian duma ordered Imme- 
diate offensive by Russian armies. 

Two Zeppelins raided coast of Kent, one 
being destroyed. 

June 20.— President Wilson Issued call 
for 70.000 volunteers for regular army. 

June 22.— French repulsed violent attacks 
of Germans on the Ohemln des Dames. 

June 23.— House passed food control bill 
with "bone dry" amendment. 

June 25.— President Wilson appointed an' 
exports council composed of the secre- 
taries of state, agriculture and commerce 
and the food administrator. 

Greek cabinet headed by Zalmis re- 
signed. 
French made decided gains near Hurte- 

blse. 

June 26.— American Coal barons agreed to 
fixing of prices. 

President appointed medtcal and food 
commission to go to Russia. 

First contingent of Pershing's army 
landed In France. 

June 27.— Second contingent of Pershing's 
army landed In France. 

Congress of workmen's and soldiers' 
delegates of all Russia adopted resolution 
rejecting any move for separate peace. 

New Greek cabinet headed by Venlzelos 
took oath of office. 

French cruiser Kleber sunk by mine; 33 
lost. 

June 2S.— Brazil revoked Its deeree of 
neutrality in war between entente allies 
and Germany. 

June 29.— Greece broke off diplomatic re- 
lations with Germany, Austria, Bulgaria 
and Turkey. 

June 30.— Russians opened offensive on 
wide front In Gallcia. 

French and Germans fighting bitterly on 
Dead Man hill. 

July. 

July 1.— Russians captured Konluchy. 
Gallcia. and Turkish strongholds In the 
Caucasus. 

July 3.— French repulsed great German 
attack near Cerny. 

Transports with Pershing's horses and 
ammunition reached France. 

July 4.— German aviators raided Har- 
wich, killing 11; two airplanes destroyed. 

July 5.— Violent battle between Russians 
and Germans near Brseznny. 

July 6.— Sinking of American steamship 
Orleans by submarine announced. 

July 7.— Russians successfully attacked 
In PfriBk sector. 

Germans made air raid on London, kill- 
ing 37 and losing a number of planes. 

Senate adopted food bill clauses prohi- 
biting use of foods for distillates and di- 
recting tho commandeering of all whisky 
now in bond. 

July 8.— President Wilson proclaimed an 
embargo on shipments of rood. fuel, steel 
and munitions, to cut off supplies from 
neutral countries to Germany except dairy 

Froducts for non-combatants In exchange 
or coal. 

Russians took three villages and 7,000 
prisoners wast of HUnlslau. 

July I. New Austrian cabinet resigned. 

President Wilson called entire National 
Guard and Its rranrva Into the federal 
sendee by A usual t. 

American steamer Kanaan destroyed by ' 
submarine. 

British beltlenhlp Vaiiauard tleelioyed 
by Interior explosion, »>0 loal 

July 10 Huealana broke Teuton line I 
MjM ef Lean berg and took llalics 

dermait* emaehed British Hue ea Nleu- 
gexi treat la Uet«!«a>. 



solute powers. 



Germans lost heavily in attacks alone 
the Ctn.min des Dames. 

July 24.— Gocihals, Denman and White 
out of shipping board; Read Admiral 
Cuppa, E. N. Hurley and Bainbridge Colby 
appointed to succeed them. — fc 

«^^, a ,JI MeAdoo asked congress for 

$3,000,000,000 more for war. 

.4 Russians evacuated Stanislau. 



French defeated Germans on Craonne 
plateau. 

July 25.— Mutinous division of KornllofPs 
Russian army reported blown to pieces 
with Its own artillery. 

Russians and Roumanians in South Car- 
pathians broke Teuton line. 

National Guard of 19 states and District 
of Columbia mobilized. 

July 26.— Teutons took four more Gall- 
clan towns from Russians. 

Germans repulsed in Champagne, but 
made slight gain on Aisne front. 

Allied conference in Paris declared war 
must be fought to the finish. 

July 27.— Austro-Germans continued their 
advance in Tarnopol region. 

July 23.— Germany yielded to Argentine 
demands concerning submarine warfare. 

Landing of more American troops In 
France announced.' 

War Industries board, F. N. Scott chair- 
man, created. 

Juij -29:'— Germany and Austria-Hungary 
officially put out peace talks. 

Russians retired bey>r J .3 border 

near Husiatyn. 

French repelled fierce attack on Aisne 
front. 

July 30.— Germans penetrated Russian 
territory east of Zbrocz, but Russian re- 
sistance stiffened. 

netiry Chapman Gilbert, Washington, 
first man accepted for National army. 

British cruiser Ariadne torpedoed, 33 
killed. 

July 31.— Anglo-French forces 
great offensive in Flanders on 20" mile 
front taking 11 villages and 5,000 prisoners. 

August. 

Aug. 1.— British and French gained fur- 
ther ground in Ypres Bector. but Germans 
recaptured St, Julien and part of West- 
hoek. 

Aug. 2.— German counter-attacks in Flan- 
ders repulsed. 

Kornlloff succeeded Brusslloff as com- 
mander In chief of Russian armies. 

Aug. 3.— Austrlans captured Czernowltz 
and KImpolung. 
British re-took St. Julien. Flanders. 
Serious draft riots in central Oklahoma. 
Holland American liner Noordam dis- 
abled by mine. 

Aug. 4.— Shipping board commandeered 
about 675 ships under construction. 

Aug. 5— President Wilson drafted entire 
National Guard Into federal service. 

Oermans made violent attack on British 
In Hollebeke. 

Canadian troops reached environs of 
Lens. 

Russian retreat halted near Czernowltz 
and Chotln. 

Aug. 6.— Chancellor Michaells made many 
changes in imperial and Prussian mlnis- 
teries. 

Premier Kerensky completed a coalition 
cabinet. 

Germans drove. Russians back In re- 
gion of Fokshanl. 

American tank steamer Campana- sunk 
by U-boat; captain and four gunners made 
prisoners. 

Aug. 7.— French penetrated German lines 
In Champagne tn three places. 

Aug. 8.— Roumanian forces opened new 
offensive north of Fokshanl. 

Food control bill sent to President Wil- 
son. 
Canadian conscription bill passed. 
Aug. 9.— Teutons forced crossing of Su- 
chltza river In Fokshanl region. 

Aug. 10.— British drove Germans back 
two miles In Flanders and French ad- 
vanced east and north of Blxschoote. 
Russians repulsed north of Fokshanl. 
Aug. 11.— Arthur Henderson resigned as 
labor member Of British war cabinet, be- 
ing accused of double dealing concerning 
Stockholm conference. 

Herbert Hoover made American food ad- 
ministrator. 

Aug. 12.— German airplanes raided Eng- 
land, killing 23. 

Russians forced back in Moldavia, de- 
spite desperate resistance. 

Aug. 13.— Germans took Panciu, Molda- 
vian railway junction, after hard battle. 

Japanese mission arrived In United 
States. 

Attg^44. — China declared war on Ger- 
many and Austria-Hungary. 



German aviators i.ornbed American hos- 
pital (amp. killing ; 

Sept. ((.-"-Secretary j.nnsing exposed vio- 
lations of neutrality by .Swedish officials in 
Argentina and Stockholm, In transmitting 
German cabtegrajna advising sinking of 
Argentine v. ael 

French cabinet resigned. 

Seat ».— Kornilei tnder In chief 

of Russian armies, headed military coun- 
ensky" "" *' nd Was Ui ■ imiHS '-" i uv K « r - 

tofanniA^?^.^" 53 ^ War rcvf nl!a W " 
Painiev o b o c * nio French p re m ie r. — 



Z£3$ "--Austrlans faTied'm 'u'rapcrkte'r' > ^«««^ 
attacks on Monte San Gabriele. 



Sept. 12. -Count Luxburg.'German min- 
ister to Argentina, given his passports; 
anti-German riots in Buenos Air. s 

Kerensky made commander in chief of 
Russian armies. 

Trading with the enemy bill passed, with 
amendment forbidding publication of war 
SSo, 1 " German wltb0 «t English 

i.^ ^"?] 1 ! ' , t ^ re « STiven supreme author- 
ity in Poland by Germany and Austria. 
Sept. 13.— Kornlloff's revolt collapsed 
Secretary Lansing exposed unneutral 
action of former Swedish charge In Mexico 

Russian army advanced toward Riga- 
,. be P> H-— Italians drove Austrlans from 
Monte San Gabriele summit. 

'eV S iS^Ki 5 T^ enale I^ssed bUl for $11,538,- 
Jjti,400 bond Issues. 

British naval aircraft destroyed one Ger- 
man destroyer and some trawlers near Os- 

Sept. 16.— Premier Kerensky proclaimed 
Russia a republic. ^ uut ' u 

0*»l 17.— Costa Rica broke off relations 
with Germany. -~~«»«» 

Germany apologized to Argentina for 

»,i"f, n r ^ s act 1 10 " a - , but Argentina demand- 
ed full formal explanation. 
^Roumanians took German positions near 

Sept. 18.— Russia begad reorganlzatioa of 
army, suppressing soldiers' committees. 

House passed $7,l«,00o,0uo deficiency war 
s?uj)j>iy uiii. 

Sept, 19.— Argentine senate voted for 
break with Germany. 

Sept. Z'J.— ErlUsh began great offensive 
east of lpres. 
| Prcsuii nt Wilson 

i wai labor troubles. 

Sept. '21.-Secretar>- Lansing published 
message ot Von Bernstorif to Berlin ask- 
j ing leave to spend $50,w0 "to inllueace con- 
opened | gress. 

Costa Rica severed diplomatic relations 
with Germany. 

Germany and Austria replied favorably 
to pope s peace proposal. 

General Bliss succeeded General Scott as 
chief of staff, U. S. A. . 

Germans broke through Russian Una at 
Jacobstadt. 

Sept. 22.— Secretary Lansing revealed de- 
tails of Bernatorft's plotting before U. 3. 
entered the war. 

Fierce fighting continued in Flanders. 

British bombarded Ostend. 

Sept. 23.— Secretary Lansing disclosed 
German abuse of U. S. protection by con- 
cealing in Bucharest legation explosives 
and disease germs after U. S. had taken 
It over. 

Russians took German 
Pskoff. 

Sept. 24.— German airplanes raided Eng- 
land, killing 20. 

War Industries board and producers cut 
steel prices In half. 



Til-, 



new Italian 



Second Liberty loan over-subscrihod. 

Oct. 28.— French in Flanders took 
iage of r.uyghem. 

2?l- ^--V'*< "o-Cnrmans took Cormons. 

Oct. 89.— Anatro-Cermans took Udine 
and broke through Carnlc Alps into Vene- 

British advanced L000 yards toward Rou- 

Vlttorio Orlando formed 
cabinet. 

Count George von Hertling made Ger- 
man imperial chancellor, Michaells having 
resigned. 

Oct 31. -Berlin reported 129,000 Italians 
and more than l.Oev ^uns captured. 

Hoover closed Elgin butter board for oc- 
riod of the war. 

American transport Finland struck by 
torpedo; eight men killed. 

November. 

Nov. 1.— Italians re-formed behind the 
Tagliamemo. 
B rit i sh announced I ' uulure o f B e-e r anfcba .' 



positions near 



. Peace proposals by the pope made pub- 
lic. 

Aug. 15.— Canadian troops captured Hill 
70. dominating Lens and the Loos salient, 
and entered Lens. 

Teutons stormed bridgehead at Baltare- 
tu, Roumania. and took Stroanl. 

Ex-Czar Nicholas and famllv sent from 
EsarskoevSelo to Tobolsk. Siberia. 

U. S. government's plan to control flour ' 
and wheat put In operation. 

Aug. 16-^rttlsh and French mado big 
gains in Flanders, taking Langemarck and 
other villages. 

Von Mackensen drove Russians across 
the Sereth river. i 



Germans lost heavily in attacks near 
Verdun. 

Sept 25.— Germans made two more air 
raids on England. 

Argentine chamber of deputies voted to 
sever relations with Germany. 

U. S. senate passed $8,000,000,000 war de- 
ficiency bill. 

Sept. 26.— British took strong positions 
from Germans east and northeast of 
Ypres. 

Germany offered to evacuate Belgium 
under certain conditions. 

Peru presented ultimatum to Germany 
concerning sinking of bark Lorton. 

Strike of iron workers at San Francisco 
ended. 

Gen. Soukhomllnoff, former war minis- 
ter of Russia, sentenced for life for high 
treason. 

Sept. 27.— Democratic congress met In Pe- 
trograd. 

Sept. 2R.— Many I. W. W. leaders Indicted 
for seditious conspiracy. 

Sept. 29.— British captured Ramadle, Me- 
sopotamia, and its large garrison. 

German airplanes raided London. 

British airplanes bombed Zeebrugge. 

Rioters at Essen demanded peace and 
food. 

Sept. 30.— Two more air raids made on 
London. 

Fuel Administrator Garfield set limits 
for retail prices of coal. 

Italians made big gains on Bainslzza, 
plateau. 

Great mass meeting lor peace held In 
Frankfort. 

Revolt In Russian Turkestan. 

Dctoher. 



■ rfSBed Livenza river 



became 



Aug. IS— French made great airplane 
raids on German positions In Belgium and 
Germany. 

Italians began new offensive In tho Ison- 
zo region. 

Aug. 19.— British line advanced 500 yards ' 
oast of Langemarck, mnlnlv with "tanks." i 

Many I. W. W. leaders "arrested by U. 
S. federal agents. 

Italians made big advance from Plava 
to the sea. 

Aug. 20.— French drove back Germans in 
Verdun sector on It mile front, taking 
Avocourt wood, Le Mort Homme summits, 
Corbeaux wood and Champneuvllle. 

Aug. 21.-Brltlsh forced their way fur- 
ther Into the defenses of Lens. 

French mado further advances In Ver- 
dun sector. 

President Wilson tentatively fixed prices 
of coal In United States. 

Aug. 22.— Germans opened offensive tn 
Riga region. 

British took Important positions along 
Tpres-Menln road. i 

Germans made air raids on English 
coast, killing 11. 

Japanese mission received In Washing- 
ton. 

Aug. 23-Dr. H A. Garfield made fuel 
administrator of IT. 8. 

Aug. 24.— British pushed back on Tpres- 
Menln road. 

French took Hill 304. Verdun, by storm. 

Aug. 24.— Italians captured Monte Santo, 
northeast of Qorlzla. 

Aug. 26 - Italian* broke through Aus- 
trian lines toward Gorlala. 

Aug. 26 -British took strong German 
poaluona east of Marglrourt 

Aug. 27 - President Wilson proclaimed 
embargo tn all the world to «W.i H ab- 
solute control "f He e*ports 

Ittttalan factional Inadera pledged war to 
victory 

Aug r» nl Wilson r»|ee|«d the 

^^n p«"< "»l« >■ Impossible While 

ilerniso mittv riry mists. 

Germany promised Argentine Indemnity 
for destruction of the Tern and allowed 
freedom of the aeee to vessels under Ar- 
gentine Hag carrying food. 



Oct. I.— Heavy attacks of Germnas re- 
pulsed by French and British, and of Aus- 
trlans by Italians. 

Four groups of German airplanes raid- 
ed London and coast towns 

Second Liberty loan campaign started. 

trench airmen made reprisal raids on 
Frankfort, Stuttgart, Treves and Cob- 
lerfz, and British bombed Zeebrugge locks. 

Oct. 2.— British repulsed six desperate 
German attacks In Flanders. 

British cruiser Drake torpedoed: 19 
killed. 

Oct. 3.— President Wilson signed the war 
tax bill. 

Russian democratic congress voted 
against a coalition government. 

Oet. 4.— British won great battle east of 



program 



an- 



Ypres. 

Oct. 5— French repulsed violent attack 
on Hill 344. 

Oct. 6.— Peru broke off relations with 
Germany. 

Congress completed Its war 
and adjourned. 

Oct. 7. -Uruguay severed relations with 
Germany. 

Oct. 8.— Pershing and Bliss commissioned 
generals. 

Oct. 9,-Brltlsh and French made 
other big advance in Flanders. 

Oct. m-Secretary Lansing revealed 
Bemstorff s part In German sabotage clots 
in America In 1916. 

President Wilson directed the food ad- 
ministration to license after Nov. X manu- 
facture, storage. Importation and distri- 
bution of about 20 prime commodities. 

n ct *i*-T? t, U2 n *Jalned half mile on alx 
mile front In Flanders. 

Germans oaptiired pa rt of Island of 
Oesel In Gulf of Riga. 

♦ ? C J; J?'~ < ?*. r ? , *ll" to °* Arensburg. capi- 
tal of Oesel Island. 

Oct. 14 -President Wilson creatod war 
board tp stop trading with the enemy and 
took other steps to curb enemy activities 
in America. 

One Russian and two German torpedo 
boats sunk In battle near Oeael. 
a. i. 1s --"««»rucllon of French steamer 
Hedle by sumbarlne announced; 2S0 lives 

n-! 1 ? V 17 ~ Two Oerman raiders sank two 
British destroyers and 13 Scandinavian 

I!. 1 .. a,,,m<ln th *y wor » roiivoylng In tho 
North sea. 

Oct 17 Germans In full possession of Is- 
land Of Oeael 
American t 

e7 le.l 

from itusaians 

i» UereuMie made air raid en Loa- 
den. KIlllitaT M. 

Four Zeppelins .leetrored by the 
s r» no ft. 

>"■' M French sad Britten meat* Oheu. 
tend BfjH»«M «a utile ead a sa*sf 



rtrTfT* Antilles turpadoed; 
tana • aptured Moon Island 



Nov. 2— Crown prince withdrew from the 
Chemin des Dames to the Ailette river. 

German uprising reported in southern 
Brazil. 

One German cruiser and ten armed 
traders sunk by J3rilish ia_4he CattegaX- 

Lnited States and Japan made compact 
on open door in China and co-operation la 
the war. 

No» 3. -Germans raided salient heM by 
Americans, killing three, wounding 5 and 
taking 12 prisoners. 

Nov. 5.— American patrol boat Alcedo 
sunk by torpedo; 21 Tost. 

British captured Tekrit. Mesopotamia, 
after hard battle. ^^ ^ 

No"v. 6.-Italians retreated from XagUa- 
mento line. •— s»»r 

British captured Fasschendaele and ad* 
vanced SOO yards beyond. 

Nov. 7— Italians fell back to Livenza 
river. Germans following. 

Russian rebels seized vital points in Pe- 
trograd. 

American commission to Paris confer- 
ence, headed by Col. House, reached Bag- 
land. „ ^* 

British in Palestine captured Gaza. 

Nov. 8.— Russian maximalists under 
Lenine seized government and planned for 
immediate peace; Kerensky fled from Pe- 
trograd. 

Austro-Germans 
In places. 

Nov. 9— Prifain. Franco and Italy cre- 
ated interallied war committee; Gen. Dlas 
made first commander of Italian armies. 

Nov. 10.— Russian rebel government made 
Lenine premier. 

Germans reached Piave river in Baty. 

■Nuv—IL—Italians *apuleed Teuton s ne a r 
Asiago. 

Loyal troops' attacked maximalists In 
Petrograd. 

Nov. 12.— Heavy fighting in Moscow, fol- 
lowed by compromise. 
Italians held Teutons on Plave river. 
Nov. 13.— Kerensky and the Cossacks 
badly defeated. 
French cabinet resigned. 
Nov 14 -Heavy fighting all along the 
Plave In Italy. 

Nov. 15.— Georges Clemenceau 
premier of France. 

Italians inundated big section about the 
lower Plave to save Venice. 

Socialist seized the government of Fin* 
land. 

Nov. 16.— U. S. cabinet decided to de- 
mand a supreme war council. 
Nov. 17— Bolshevlki won in Moscow. 
British light sea forces routed German 
squadron off Helgoland. 
British occupied Jaffa, Palestine. 
Teutons who crossed Plave at Zenson 
annihilated. 

Nov. 18.— Bolshevlki generally victorious 
In Russia; Civil war halted by lack .©! 
food. 

Kaiser refused to treat for peaee with 
new government of Russia. 
Berlin police killed socialist rioters. 
Nov. 19.— Teutons concentrating big gun 
fire on north of Italian line. 

President Wilson Issued proclamation 
putting severe restrictions on enema 
aliens in United States. 

Daniel Willard made head of U. S. <waj 
industries board. 

American destroyer Chauncey sunk in 
collision; 21 lost. 

Nov. 20.— Two American soldiers killed 
and five wounded In artillery combat. 

British opened new offensive between 
St. Quentln and the Scarpe. 
German attacks on Italian line ceased. 
Nov. 21.— British smashed through the 
Hindenburg line toward Cambral, taking 
many towns and thousands of prisoners 

French successfully attacked German 
salient south of Juvlncourt. 
Nov. 22.-Furious fighting near Cartbral. 
Italians meeting great massed attack 
between Piave and Brenta rivers. 

Bolsheviki government In Ttussia pro- 
posed general armistice. 

Nov. 23. -The Ukraine declared separa- 
tion from Russia. »•— — 

Nov 24.-The British took Bourlon wood, 
near Cambral ^^» 

The Caucasus declared Its Independence. 

Nov. 23— British and French 
reached Italian front. 

Nov. 27.— Superior wai 
formed for United States. 

British took part of Fontaine near Cam- 
bral. 

Italians repulsed fierce Texiton attacks. 

Nov. 23i— eoalttknr minlstfy r TTbrn^dUT 
Russia. ^^ ^ 

Germany assented to bolsheviki plan- fo» 
armistice. *^ 

U. S. government assumed control over 
all Imports. 

Three Scandinavian kings agreed in 
maintain neutrality. 

Nov 29 -Interallied war conterenca 
opened In Paris. 

Austria agreed to Russia armistice plan. 

Nov. 30.— Government announced s<tf« 
arrival in France of large numbers of Na- 
tional Guard troops. ~ 

Germans pierced British lines south of 
Cambral. 

December. 

Dec. 1.— British regained most of ground 
lost near Cambral, and nine German at- 
tacks were repulsed with great losses. 

Deo. 2.-Britlsh withdrew from Maa- 
nieres on Cambral front. 

D *c . 3,-Brltlsh repulsed furious attacks 
near Cambral. 

United States congress met for second 
war session. 

England reported East Africa complete- 
ly cleared of Germans. 

Russian deputation began armistice neg- 
otiations with Germans. Armistice an- 
nounced on many sections of Russian 
front. 

Dec. 4— President Wilson, in his annua) 
message declared peace would not be 
made with present rulers of Germany/. 
that America would fight to last gun, sum 
asked declaration of war against Austria* 
Hungary. 

Establishment of Tartar republic .fee 
Crimea announced. 

British steamer Apapa torpedoed; M 
passengers and the crew loet 

Dec. « Germans rejected Russians' Aral 
demands In armistice negotiations. 

Italians lost some positions on Asiago 
plateau. 

British aviators raided Swetbrucken and 
Sa trhrucken. , 

British withdrew from Bourlon wood 
salient near Cambral. 

Bee. <— Italians driven back on Asiago 
plateau. 

Armistice for ten days declared on 
slim front. 

German air raiders killed seven In 
hind. 

U. S, destroyer Jacob Jones tori 
ee' men lost 

Dec, T.— United Rlatea congress ls»rlira4 
war on Austrla-Hunsary 

Houmanla accepted aranletlee wttk) tt*» 
enemy. 

Dee 1 Great Italian air 8MI 

reesful attack no Auai 

Fi nader severed diplomatic 
wjth 0«rmany 

na • Kalrdtnea and Korntloet 
revet* of Ceeeewae against lawtee) 

eaasTJWe wj eTa II ersV • el 

KaJle traeU I^MttdMi ¥SK&Xk 



council of H 




MM 



m 



■MI 



- 



kY JANUARY JOth, .lt»l8 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



BOONE CO. RECORDER 

\X. L. RTDDKLL. Publisher. 

— Il l !. I 




KEEPING UP TIIE RECORD. * 

In the matter or «wat&#r Janu- 
ary began whriv Docrmbcr Irf* 
off, ana bcctos Inclined to keep an 
the record. 



ROUGH SLEDDING. 




Rural nio.il carriers hh>c 


had 


prettv tough sledding this 


VIT1- 


tsr, and have orivn^d every 


cent 


of tin- salary they received. 





DRIVING ACilO.SS THE OHIO. 
— 511 kimls Of vchU'li's'vvi'iv l-ioss- 
iTrjr th' v liver on tbe ice> at Rabbit 
Hart th.- la tte r part of last week. 
At that point thf> river was froz- 
en smooth, while at points where 
it blockotl it was so rough that 
a person could hardly walk across. 

SMALL POX. 

A case of smallpox developed in 
a road camp down on Mud Lick 
creek last week. There were four 
colored men in camp there ami 
two of them had had the disease, 
and one had been vaccinated, and 
Dr. Ryle hoped to be a^ble to con- 
fine the disease to the one pa- 

A WELCOME RAJN. 

"The rain that came list Satur- 
day sight, together with the SX\QVC 
it melted replenished all the cis- 
terns and water courses in this 
part of the country very much to 
the relief of everybody. Many 
cisterns had been dry for seves a! 
weeks and the water probl.'i.i was 
becoming acute. 



To those who Have Sold To- 
bacco to Thompson & 
Wingate. 

Wo will not receive an v of our 
purchase of tobacco at Pet- 
ersburg. Your contracts call 
for delivery at Aurora and 
the unusual price was paid 
to insure its being- brought 
to the Aurora Loose Leaf 
Market the best in the coun- 
try. 

Al! tobacco must be in 
good, winter order. No wet 
or r.it->tomnu\i will be ac- 
cepted. Dealers make a dif- 
ference of 10 to 15 cents in 
price where it if found in 
this condition. All tobacco 
now stripped ninst be hung 



before delivered. 

We are sorry river con- 
ditions have delayed delive- 
ry, but must ask our friends 
to be patient. We are ready 
to receive and pay for all to- 
bacco contracted for as soon 
as ferrying is resumed at 
Aurora. 

THOMPSON & 
WINGATE. 



! 



AN OLD SOLDIER DIES. 

John G. Cri=lrr. of Walton, dialling bu-uiifss in Burlington 
oji the 4th inst. Mr Crislr-i' was day. 



an old ConfeiTerile soldier, having 
served under Gen. John H Mor- 
gan, in whoso, command there 
were so many Boone county boys. 
He was the father of Mrs. J, Sam 
Adams, and a most highly respect 
ed and beloved citizen. 



the 
fooi 



DON'T KILL THE HENS. 

In an effort to produce 
greatest possible volume of 
from America's ooultry resources, 
W. F, Priebe, head of tbe poultry 
division of the food administra- 
tion, plans to start a campaign 
among American farmers and 
poultry men to sell no hens until 
after the laying season. 

A FUEL FAMINE. 

The fuel problem has reached a 
very serious situation in Peters- 
burg, and those who have been 
able to secure any coal recently 
have paid 43 cents a bushel therer- 
for, having it hauled from Con- 
stance. ' In some instances citi- 
zens have <cut their shade trees 
for wood to use in their stoves, 
heaters or grates, and there is no 
indication of an improvement in 



Personal Mention 

Attorney Bcnj. H Kilov 
the Chrletraa . ro with 

mother in Coving fon. 

Miss Georgia Whit \ >1 Wa 
was visiting friends in Bui 

cevera] days l . .< wivk. 

Ezra Aylor and son, H « - arn, 
were guests at Edward Rice's one 

night during the holidays. 

Mrs. C, \V. Goodridge mtrr.ain- 
ed one afternoon durini the h >li- 
days with a Five Hundred patty 

Miss Mary Fur!on, r was eallen 
to Cincinnati, las! Friday, t.i a>- 
tend the funeral of cne of her 
cousins. 

Rankin RevlTt, v i, • .mri BOB, Ot 
Lexington, were holiday guests of 
his mother, Mrs. Bfonette Revill. 
i par town. 

James L. Ciore, who is empR»y- 
ed at the Emery Hotel in Cincin- 
nati, bb n. last Saturday week in 
Burlington - ; 

Walton Demps iy, w ho attend* 
the Si itr College at Lexington, 
[spent part <if the Christmas holi- 
days :n liurlin ,'ton.. 

W. L and Ora Ogden, oi Nbrth 
Bffffd neig h borhood, were in l'u- 
Hngtrm a few days ago on the 
qn ys ti o nHi rr Hisi np ss, 1 

Miss beatee Walton. <>( Savior 
Park, Ohio, spent the Christmas 
holidays with h^r grandmother, 
Mrs. Mary Cropper. 

Prof, and Mrs Caywood return-' 
ed home last Saturday evening af- 
ter spending the holidays with, 
relatives at Maysville. 

Dr. Hubsrt Walton an<l wife ana' 
Mrs. Elihu Alden, oi' Pett rsnurg. 1 
were business visitors to Burling- 
ton, one day last week. 

Chas. Holt was at home from ! 
Camp Taylor on a furlough dur- 
ing the holidays visiting friends 
in Waterloo neighborhood. 

Mr. and Mrs Elza PoStOB re- 
turned home last Saturday fro n 
Dayton. Ohio, where they svpnt j 
the holidays with relatives. 

Mrs. Karl Rous? was very ill of 
pneumonia during the holidays. | 
Her son had just recovered from 
a severe attack of thai disease!. The United States Food Admin- 

C. O Hempfiing and son. Listen, ' istration has stopped "eomb.na- 
and Lloyd McGIasBon, of T.iy.ors- tion sales" by retail dealers in 
port neighborhood, were transact- food commodities, with the single 

last Frij exception that a dealerymay at his 
I op t ion sell sugar in combination 

M^taier xMartin and ftuV. ol — th.'!*'*^ c orn meal, eoauifing a euoto | , 
Pleasant Valley vicinity, spent the! m " r to buy with his sugar twice 



Red Gross Notes. 



The- long promised yarn has 
been in transit since Dee. 14th It i 
bhould arrive soon, it seems. 

Lack of material can cause no' 
more delay. Two bales of gause' 
and two of muslin have been pur- 
chased. 

The officers of the Burlington 
unrf thank most heart ilv for their 
result getting effort in the Christ- 
mas Drive, Messrs. A B. Renaker, 
C W, Goodridge, R. S. Cowen, J. 
A. Caywood, W, A, Oainos, Hubert 
White, Geo. Blyth, Cecil Gaines, 
Asa McMullen, and the Record( r 
for its generous spare allowance.! 
The Burlington Juniors desire 
yarn to knit an afghan. Thev are| 
mad- <>, nine knitted squares'. if. 
anyone has a bit of varn or an ! 
old knitted article that can be 
ravelled, it surely would help, 
and thr> brighter the color tho 
bitter. This yarn can be left at 
hear! quarters. | 

Walton, Union, "Petersburg ann 
; Burlington are working on a smalt 
[special order— 500 eight by four- 
tei ji inch c^mnresses to ne in 




Corn Meal to be Only 

"Combination" With Sugar. 



ished 150 oy Friday. 

Completed work received 
week. 
WALTON- 

4 suraters, 

23 pairs sock s. 

36 shirts. 
VERONA- 

10 sheets, 

3 suraters, 

9 pairs socks. 
BIG BONE— 

13 whirls 
BEAVER- 

10 pairs socks, 
1 surater. 

HEBRON— 

1 surater, 

1 scarf, 

34 pairs socks. 
RABBIT HASH- 

4 outing shirts. 

a muslin shirts. 

UNION- 

13 pairs socks, 

3 pairs wristlets, 
1 surater. 
BURLINGTON— 

5 suraters, 

11 pairs socks, 

14 four-inch **' 



last 



h oliday in Bnritngton with h«. : the weight oi corn meal 

parents, Mr. and Mrs C. C. Roo-j T h? Food Administration has fori 

bidden the practice by which deal- ' j 
, . ers compel the purchase of anvi, • 

1 commodities along with others for I ^LSl-i )**.. **?} °l g *i 
which there is a heavy demand, i 



erts 

Frank Milner, of Constance 
Ralph White, of Plattshurg neigh 
borhood, were guests of Galen 
Kelly last Saturday night ana 
Sunday. 

Wm. Walton, who resides with 
his mother, Mrs. Eliza Walton, 
out on the Belle view pike, is vis- 
iting his uncle, Carl Hunt, in 
Kansas. 

Miss Laura Frances Riddetl re- 
turned to her school at Dayton, O. 
last week, after spending the hol- 
idays with her parents, Mr. 
Mrs. M Riddell. 

Judge Gaines was absent a dav 
or two last week attending the- Nevv Y ork, Jan. 2 -Should Jess 
convention oi Circuit Judges ana j Willard and Fred Fulton ever meet 
Commonwealth s Attorneys in ses- they win ^ the two tallesttand 
sion m Louisville. | heaviest men that ever came to- 

Dr. O. O. Dixon, of Rich wood, gether in a battle for the world's 
nursed Robert, little son of 



_^jes»e». 

68 eight ny four inch compresses. 

It Baves much trouole and ho 
one is left out if you send a list 
of articles with your finished 
work. 

Thistpcn million new members 
is the result of the Red Cross 
Christmas drive, which is three 
million 'letter than the number 
asked when the drive was start- 
In spite of this there are 

to be 
members who are not and who 



on the ground that such practice 
is likely to lead to the purchase 
of more food than customers real- 
ly want and is therefore wasteful. 
The permitted combination of corn 
meal and sugar is allowed as a 
wheat conservation measure. 

No retail dealer is required to 
make this combination, but he 
may if he chooses, 
he is subject to a prohibition 
J against making more than a nor- 
mal profit on either commodity. 



Mr. heavy weight championship, 
and Mrs. Chas. Maurer, through a Willard will stand 6 feet 7 inches 



severe case of double pneumonia 
during the holidays. 
J. G Finnell, of Rich wood neigh 



in height and weigh 235 pounds. 
Fulton will stand 6 feet 5!* inches 
l in height and weigh 218 pounds. 
the (fuel conditions, and the citi- j borhood wa8 transacting business Jim Jefferies and Jack Johnson 



zens are feeling pretty 
the ontlook. 



blue over 



SEED CORN $5.00 A BUSHEL 

Seed corn will sell for more than 
$5 a bushel, according to plans 
of the federal government in meet 
ing the seed corn situation. 

"Corn growers who ask more 
than this amount will be classed 
by the U. S government as pro- 
iiteers," declared Professor G. i 
Christie, state food director, in 
making the announcement, "and 
profiteering will not be tolerated. 
it is the feeling of the govern- 
ment agricultural men that good 
see d coan should retail to the 
^OTHeTr at price* not to exceed 



A QUIET WEDDING. 
• Fred Morris and Miss Gertie 
•Merman were quietly "married 
about two weeks ago. The groom 
has been a citizen of this neigh- 
borhood for several years and has 
made many friends here. Th ■> 
bride resided in Latoni a where 
•he was an efficient and popular 
employee of a bank. Only two 
or three of the groom's friends 
faff r B w ere aware that Mr. Morris 
had become a benedict un'.i! 
About two weeks after the nup- 
tials. The Recorder joins the 
host of friends of the happy pal/ 
in wishing <3them a long, happy 
life and an abundance of pros- 
perity. 



A MAEINE VISITS HEBRON 

ly R. Rogers, a former s 
ful teacher of this county, i 



rs enlisted' in th.> marine 

tps last June, and sine" that 

tin*© has been in rigid training 

Y aorvice. For some time his 

pmpany has been prepared to go 

ifar there' - and i* now only 

•waiting the order to start, which 

Jr. Rogers thinks and hopes will 

► soon. Judginsr from the health 

md attitude of Mr. Rogers. Uncle 

lift it not only giving the boys 

Iftabi* physical and moral train- 

tn* preservation or world 

Is also showing lb. -in 

itor of o»»r 

41minUh«*d b> 

,flees on tbr 

A", when we 

»nd bo 




•no noy« 
•t J»om« 

HE? ' ^ 



uoy« well i 
•t horns, willlng- 
thPlr III 
nitly'i 



at the court house. 



and made this office a call— renew 
ing his subscription for another 
year. 

R. T, Stephens, of Rabbit Hash, 
was a visitor to Burlington, one 
day the past week. coming to 
meet hib son, who is employed in 
Cincinnati, to make up his qucs- 
tionaires. 

Rev. Robert McNeely and wife 
came in from Waterloo, over the 
East Bend road, about noon Tues- 
day. It was an interesting trip 
owing to the knobby condition 
of the road. 

Mrs. Walter Garnet^and family, 
JUm Morris Rouse and little babyr 
and Mrs. Brenda Garnett and 
daughter* Miss Mayme, of Hebron, 
were Sunday guests of Mr. ana 
Mrs. Elmor Kirkpatiick, 

Courtney Walton, of Erlangcr. 
was a visitor to Burlington, one 
day during th* Christmas holi-, 
days. When he wants to have 
some real pleasure Mr. Walton al- 
ways comes over to the capital 
of Boone. 

Mr. and Mrs Woodie Sullivan, 
of Commissary neighborhood, en- 
tertained the young folks with a 
party one night during the holi- 
days. Several of tht Burlington 
young people attended, and all re- 
port a splondid time. 

Mrs. Menter Martin and sister, 
Miss Mary Roberts, are engaged 
making up one of Assessor W. P 
Beemon'B books. To make the 
book under the new revenue law 
of thr» State requires a vast 
Ray R. Rogers, a former success- aiT , ount of yary p ar ti cu j ar work. 



last Friday,! were perhaps the 
men to battle for 
weight crown before Willard's day 
but compared to Witlard and Ful- 
ton Jefferies and Johnson were 
dwarfs. Jefferies stood 6 feet in ! 
height and Johnson, from whom j 
Willard won the championship-, 
is 6 feet ^ inch. 




plaints to mak:- of his treatment, 
C. Scott Chamber*, of Walton, 
passed thru Burlington, Tuesday, 
ernoute to Petersburg, having his 
live passenger Chevrolet loaded 
with coal for bin stater, Mn. 
Mathews. He expected to t. lip- 
ids mothor home with him to re- 
main during the winter or until 
the fuel problem is solxt-.i ut Pet- 
ersburg. 

HELP GET RID OF RATS. 

\ n* pienl bun been fceiii out t.v 

(ho government, asking every eii- 

tti help rid ibr country <>r 

rat*. Rats destroy and cooaum* 

?roat nunnUtir* v»[ foodfttufU. 
boy also carry di«-.w»e get 
rim Kuvernmriit suggiMiU orgtt 

omrauiilt) effort lo grt rlu 
Mt them. 



Washington, Jan. 7,— The selec 
tive draft act was today upheld 
as constitutional hv the Suprem 
Court. 

The Government's c ontentions 
that the power given Congress to 
declare war includes power to 
compel citizens to render military 
service, both at home and abroad, 
were sustained by the court. 

Chiof Justice White, who deliv- 
ered the unanimous opinion in a 
brief statement declared that, af- 
ter considering the various con- 
tentions, the conclusion had been 
reached that both of them were 
imaginary rather than real. 

FISCAL COURT NEWS. 



I should send in their names and 
their dollars. 

Mrs. Bessie D, Goodridge, Sec- 
retary of the Red Cross, is in re- 
ceipt of the following letter from 
Frank C. Greene, Kentucky Direc- 
tor: 

My Dear Mrs. Goodridge: 
In response to your request for 
he does, i 2,000 buttons, I have forwardea 
your request to the Cleveland of- 
fice, and asked that they give it 
immediate attention. I regret 
that our supply of buttons was 
exhausted during the drive, and 
we nave been unable to secure 
an additional supply. 

I am. indeed glad that your chap 

ter made such a splendid record 

during the Christmas Drive, and 1 

must say that I see no cause 

why you should not be proud of 

yourselves. It is indeed a pleasure 

to know, as I have always known, 

that any call that may be made 

[ on thn> Boone Chapter will be an- 

4? ^.^£ e jflwered, in greater measure than 

• that in which the call came. 

With very best wishes for the 
succors of your Chapter, and heart 
j felt thanks for your efforts, I am, 
Very Respectfully, 
FRANK C. GREENE, 

Kentucky Director. 
The following is a lost of fin- 
ished work that has been sent to 
Headquarters at Cleveland from 
tho Boone County Chapter since 
its organization : 
S90 Hospital Shirts. 



I 



Tho Fiscal Court was in session 
Tuesday, County Judge P. E Ca- 
son presiding and all the Justices 
of tho Peace being present. 

Only routine business was trans- 
acted, such as allowing the Sheriff 
a delinquent list and disposing of 
the same, and looking after the 
county infirmary, jail and court 
house. 

The cost of maintaining the coun 
ty in/irmary last year was $3,509.20, 
the inmates averaging 26.125, Pr:>s 
ent number of inmates 22. F( H. 
Rouse. was appointed superintend- 
ent of the infirmary for this year, 
and his compensation fixed at 
*450. „ j 

The Sheriff was allowed 688 de- 
linquent poll tax payers and tbe 
list wa* turned over to O. P 
Phipps for collection. 

The same doctors who did the 
paupor practice in the county last 
year wore awarded the pructice 
again for this^year at the same 
price*. * 

Tho Jailer and Janitors salary 
was fixed al *»i per month. 



15 pairs bed socks. 

25 hot water bottle covers. 

36 cup covers. 

6736 compresses. 

161 gauze rolls. 

304 abdominal bandages. 

163 triangular bandages. 

bO Bcultetus bandages. 

2fi muslin bandages. 

13 flannel bandages. 

30 T-bandages. 

185 knitted sweaters. 

50 scarfs. 

310 pairs socks. 

80 pairs wristlets. 

3 helmetB. 

10 knitted wipes. 

10 knitted wash rags. 

259 comfort piltowB. 

Rev. and Mrs, McNeely mado a 
very substantial call at Headquar- 
ters, Monday, bringing in $67.70 
proceeds from a supper given for 
Red Cross benefit at Rabbit Hash, 
and seven new members for the 
roll. Mrs McNeely reports that 
Pabbit Hash has sent in to date 
100 triangular bandages, 60 muslin 
shirts, 12 outing shirts, and quite 
a number of knitted articles. 

If every one in the county that 
has any old sheets, pillow cases 
or underwear will send it in to 
headquarters at Burlington, it 
will certainly be appreciated, as 
we are badly in need of wrappers 
for surgical dressings. 

PROVING PROPHET. 

How did tho Recorder's friend, 
Bert Smith, of Ft. ThomaB, acquire 
his information as to the fre- 
quency of the snows this winter 
is a question that cannot be set- 
isfactorlly decided at this office. 
So far he has proven very cor- 
rect In his prognoHtieations. 



()u aeeoinit oi th.* lee the roads 

are in a i»sd couditn»n 

v , ■ 

Tho (unci il of CI 

v* ho diud ut upopl. w at lb' 
oiv Hotel, in Cincinnati. MonUy 
morning, will b«» held at t p. m, 
today, Thursday, from hi* horn 
•on. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦* 



WANTED PAMM HAND 
Married man to work by 

thr> month Steady work and 
good wagiH Inquire at Par- 



1«. 



HKMPPLINO. 

Fay loin port, Ky. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



HILL'S 

SEEDS 



Meet all Requirements from 

PURITY 
to 



» ■ 



PRODUCTIVENESS 



Our seeds are the result of years of careful breeding 
and testing and of knowing where and when to buy. 

The Hill Standard in Seeds is the highest it is possi- 
ble to attain, yet we strive for improvement. 

Confidence in the house of HILL continues to grow 
just as surely as HILL'S SEEDS GROW. 

We vfill be pleased to send Samples and Quote 
Prices. Let us hear from you. We'll Save You Monty 

United States Food Administration License Number G-01206. 




Phone Order Dept. S, 1855 or 1856. 



Capital Stock $30,000. Surplus $45,000 

THE 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



Desires your business; and it is our ambition 
to render you the best service possible 

All business entrusted to us will receive 
prompt and careful attention 

When we can be of service to you, do not 
hesitate to command us 7i — i~. — ~. .. .. 



3 Par Cent on Time Deposits. 



THE TROTTING STALLION 

ST. ALPHONSUS 2:24! 



By CHARLEY HERR, the iron horse 
of the grand circuit 





O. M. ROGERS, Owner. 



Will make a season at Er- 
langer Fair Grounds in 18 18. 
$20.00 to insure a living foal. 
Get your mares booked early. 
J. F. RAFFERTY, Agent. 



F 



M 



IE 



XOZ 



I 



i 



a 



BOONE COUNTY MOTOR GAR CO. 

(Not Incorporated) 

FORD SALES AND SERVICE, 
TIRES, TUBES AND ACCESSORIES. 

Wc are now prepared to deliver jour car immediately. 

Give us your Order before the Price go up. 

Touring Cara, $360.00. Runabouts, $345.00. 
I O. H. Detroit. 

SENOUR & HICKS. 

UNION, KENTUCKY. M 

=ao t— -— ii-iHl 



IE 



*. 



^BnaBHHHHBlBHBaB^HHiBBMni 



BHgi HBH 



■HBBnagBHaaiHi 



h 



t • 



*****& ' 




BOONB COUNTY RECORDER 



Tht Importunity of the Exigent. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ e 

In the lives ol mn in Lnationa • FLICKERTOWN. * 

there come exlgr-ncir * in x-hica'* • 

evfla need to be in* m-.ly ,r 



Tected, or defensive i • i >n to 
taken on the sp..t, no mat er what 
the risk. Time will not linger for 
experiment or reflection. A dread 
alternative threatens. It is nec- 
essary to act now, or the opera- 
tion of irresistible forces will 
take the matter once and {or all 
out of our hands. 

We Americans are in a frothy 
sea of such exigencies today. The 
ship of state is not running thru 
a squall, but driving into a temp- 
est. The question of porting our 
helm or reefing our sails is not 
an academic one at all, it being 
necessary to do something differ- 
ent or go upon the rocks. 

It is wonderful to observe the 
equanimity with which our nation 
iB submitting to the necessities 

• of this stormy hour. Things of the 
greatest possible import, and 
which are utterly repugnant to our 
republican institutions and ideas, 
are being done without evoking 
even whispered protests. Had any 
one proposed before this wa* *>>» 
""" . lion of our young men w. 
military purposes we should have 
burst his ear drums with our 
howls, but the exigency was im- 
portunate. It would have requir- 

-ed a few short months ago tire 
temerity of a madman to have 
proposed maximum and minimum 
prices for the staple articles of 
our daily life, or the control of 
the eoal industry^ or the imposi- 
tion of such taxes as we are hav- 
ing to pay. But now the men 
who suggest and carry out this 
program are, in the public estima 
tion, saints or sages. 
/ To crown this series of acts 
which aro theoretically antagonis- 
tic to our democratic ideals and 
methods the President has just 
announced his intention of tak- 
ing over the control of durrail 
loads and handling the whole 
vast-network f r om a -central -scat 
of power. 

"We may murmur a little in se- 
cret, but we shall not remonstrate 
in public, for the emergency is 
pressing, the exigency is impor- 
tunate. Slowly but surely we are 
coming to see that we are in the 
remorseless grin of circumstances 
and- that the old proverb is a 
true one— circumstances alter cas- 
es. 

This quiet yielding to the neces- 
sary is the finest exhibition wo 
have ever had of the flexibility of 
onr demur- r a t h . 1 ins t it utions,' -tire Mm 
eraiism of our democratic temper 
ament and the reasonableness of 
our democratic mind. A conserva- 
tism that opposes all change and 
will not bend before the exigent 
would be fatal to us in this dark 
and trying hour. We shall bow to 
the inevitable and console our- 
selves and one another with the 
reflection that the Government is 
ourselves! It is we, as a self- 
governing people, and not a 
Kaiser or a Potsdam gang, which 
is performing this apparently high 
handed act. — Enquirer 



Chas. Shinkle, Br, was a caller 
bete Saturday morning. 

C'haB. Shinkol, Jr , visited Boom 
Ryle several days last wwk. 

Tho sudden cold snap put the 
roads in very bad condition. 

J. W, White and family visiteu in 
Petersburg one day last week. 

Lewis Hensley will move to Mrs 
E. L, Grant's farm this spring. 

Woolper creek broke up Sunday 
and most of the ice went outj. 

Hazel and Sarah Brady have 
about recovered from the measles. 

Boliver Shinkle and wife visitea 
at J. W, White's several days last 
week. 

,. Win. Shotwell, of Petersburg, vis 
ited J. H Shyder several days last 
week. 

P. M Voshell and Russell Finn 
were shopping in Aurora, last Sat- 
urday. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

• VERONA. I 

♦ ♦ 

-~«eeeeeeeeeeeeea*ee 

Dr. G. F. McCormac has purchas 
ed a Victor Talking machine. 

Larry Ryan, of Iowa, is spend- 
ing a few days hero with homo 
folks. 




thpropay 






County News Items 



Interesting* Facts Gathered During the Week by Our 
Regular Correspondents. 



COUNTY OFFICIALS SWORN IN 
No new faces in Boone county's 
official outfit that qualified last 
Monday, except that of Sheriff L. 
A. Conner, Assessor H W. Riley 
and County School Superintena- 
ent J. Q Gordon, the others all 
being holdovers, P. E\ Cason en- 
tering upon his fifth term asCoun 
ty Judge, W. R Rogers his third 
term as County Clerk, N. E, Rid- 
dell his third term as County At- 
torney. County Clerk Rogers' of- 
fice deputy Is the same as here- 
tofore, his sister. Miss Lizzie, while 
his other deputies are E. C, Me 



The fuel situation here has been 
quite serious. Many persons were 
compelled to secure wooo. for 
fuel. 

Tho boys who were registered 
have been quite busy the past 
ten days making out their ques- 
tionaires. 

Owing to tho very extreme cold 
weather we have* been having re- 
cently very little tobacco" has 
been prepared for the market. 

E. C, Showers and wife came 
home after spending several days 
on their wedding tour. Mr, and 
Mrs. Showers will go to house- 
keeping in their residence near 
.New Bethel church. -We wish them 
success and happiness in the com 
ing years. 

Mr. and Mrs, O. K. Whitson en- 
tertained at dinner Tuesday in 
compliment to Mr. and Mrs B. 
C. Showers the following guests: 
Mr. and Mrs, W. M. Whitson, Dr. 
and Mrs. A N. Jones, Mr.and/IMrs. 
J. Showers. Mr, and Mrs. J. L. 
Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs D. Hes«» 
Vest, Mr. B, F. Stansifer, Robert 
Stone, Miss Aliee Whitson, Master 
William Whitson. After an extend- 
ed visit with Mr. and Mrs, Whit 
son Mr. ami Mrs, Showers 
at home at their country 
near Verona. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ FRANCESVILLE. e 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

J. W r Utzinger made a business 
trip to Cincinnati Saturday aiter- 
noon. 

Miss Bertha Baker of near But- 
ler, this state, visited friends 
here last week. 

Mrs. W, H. Eggleston had as 
guests Saturday, Misses Katherine 
Estes and Bertha Baker. 

Emmet Kilgore, wife and chil- 
dren were Sunday guests of his 
parents, Mr. and Airs, Harry Kil- 
gore. 

Miss Rebecca Dibble, of neat 
Rising Sun, spent several days last 
week with Misses Amanda Koons 
and Sadie Rieman. 

Mrs. Tommie Masters, Jr . and 
little* daughter, have returnea 
home after a visit with herfath-1 
er, Mr. Nixon, near Petersburg, 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦#♦• 

♦ ♦ 

♦ CONSTANCE ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



place 



resigned 



Neely, Bellevlew; E. L Helms, Pet ". *""*; AgHS.!*?, lawrenceburg, 
ersburg; 0. K, Whitson, Verona; ^merly of this place, is very ill, 

Bro. R H. Carter has resigned 
as pastor of the Christian church. 



A. R Johnson, Walton ; J. S. Hume, 
Berkshire; J. D Moore, Big Bone. 



For Sael— 12x24 silo. Leslie Mc- 
Mullen, near Burlington. 

For Sale— Good Jersey cow anu 
calf. R, B. Carver, Burlington.-"^ 

For Sale — 22 tons of hay— most- 
ly Timothy. Ezra Aylor East Bend. 



♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦<>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ PETERSBURG. « 

♦ ♦ 

♦♦'♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Two of Charles Shinkle's family 
have measles. 

Mrs. Edna Pierce has 
her school here. 

The river has been frozen over 
for three weeks. 

Pap Alloway, 84, had a stroke of 
paralysis last week. 

Claude Hensley has l>een very 
sick with pneumonia. 

Claude Hensley has been very 
sick with pneumonia. 

Mrs. Samuel Hensley has been 
very sick for some time. 

Mrs. Laura Chambers had a fam- 
ily reunion Christmas day. 

Bro. Woods' two daughters were 
at home during the holidays. 

Mrs. O, S. Watts spent Christmas 
with her people in Cincinnati. ' 

Cecil Burns and family dined at 
Mrs. Kate McWethy's, Sunday, 

Perry Rector from Camp Taylor 
waB home during the holidays'. 

Thos. Hynss , of 



The Sunday school treated the 
pupils to candy and gave the sup 
erintendent a acarf and Mr. Moy- 
er a shirt. 

Constance Red Cross Auxiliary 
held a pie social and watch party 
at the church New Year's night, 
and rang the old year out and the 
new year in. 22 new .members were 
received. The Unit is working hard 
to gain their quota of required 
number, and when Constance peo- 
ple try to do anything they us- 
ually succeed. 

Five of our soldier boys were 
at home during the holidays ana 
how glad and proud we are of them 
three who are preparing them- 
selves to defend our country. 
Those here were Harvey and Chas. 
Peeno, Henry Moyer, Stanley Par- 
sons and William Day. Charles 
Peeno attended the pie social 
and w hen he appeared there was 
I6lid 'clapping- ofc hands. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ GUNPOWDER. e 

♦ ♦ 
*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

R. E Tanner and wife broke 
bread with this scribe last Sunday. 

Mrs. H L. Tanner , spent the 
week's end with friends in Cov- 
ington. 

Christmas passed very quietly. 
•Nothing doing. The weather was 
too cold. 

Emmorson Smith was the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs, R. E. Tanner last 
Thursday. 

Robert Tanner and wife enter- 
tained several friends at dinner 
N?w Year's day. 

Fitzhu Tanner, who married re- 
cently, moved last week to Point 
Plecsant neighborhood. 

Tho supper given by the ladies 
of Hopeful church was a success 
both financially and socially. 

Enoch Rouse is still confined to 
his room and his condition has not 
improved very mu:.>h since our last 
report. 

Sidney Rouse and brother. of 
Lawrenceburg I s P ri ns: Place, Georgia, spent" tine 
' week's end with friends in tho 
Union precinct, and made ' nu j 
writer a brief call. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦# 

♦ FLORENCE. e 
+ + 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

Ed. Snyder has tonsilitis, 

Mrs. Ben Luck is improving, 

Water was scarce and everybody 
was glad to see the rain. 

Mrs. Elbert Roberts, who has 
been quite eick, is improving. 

Ira Long, of Camp Taylor, spent 
several days here last week with 
his friends. 

Paul (and Will Aydelotte spent 
several days the past week with 
their parents. 

Miss Elizabeth Scott, of Devon, 
was the guest of Miss Elizabeth 
Bonar, last week. 

Lawrence Long spent New- 
Year's day with his parents, Mr. 
and-Mrs. Ben-Long; 

Mr. and Mrs William Bradford 
wore Sunday guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Geq E. Rouse. 

Rufus Tanner, of Camp Shelby, 
is the guest of his Tnrrentsi, Mr. 
and Mrs. R H. Tanner. 

J. R, Whitson says the kind lib~ 
erality of his neighhors may tide 
him over until grass comes. 

Miss Willa Yealey entertained 
most delightfully her class one 
evening during Christmas. The 
rooms were very prettdy decorat- 
ed with holly and mistletoe. T*.e 
guests were Misses Sarah North- 
cutt. Mildred Eddins, Elizabeth Bo- 
nar ^and Messrs. Wiritield Myers, 
Rofls Conrad, Ravmond Newman 
and Wilford Mitchell. 



aeeeeeeeeetaeeaeeeaeaeaaae 

♦ RABBIT HASH. ? 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦«♦♦♦« 

Mrs. E R. Scot; is frery sick. 

S. N, Riggs is serving a9 juror 
in tho U. S, court at Coving ion, 
this week. 

Hubert Clore and Wilbur Kellv 
each entertained the young Fdlkd 
with a dance last week. 

James West and wife, of Rising 
Sun, came across on the ice Wed- 
nesday to make out his question- 
aire. 

A number oi our people attend- 
ed the play, "Blue Jeans," at Ris- 
ing Sun this week. The play was 
written about thirty years agu 
and the scenes were laid at Ris- 
ing Sun and Rabbit Hash, C. G, 
Riddell being one of the original 
characters, and is said to be the 
only oho now living. 

The ri\>er has been frozen over 
here for a week. Thursday, Elijah 
Hodges began hauling across the 
river with a horse and sled and 
continued the rest of the week 
hauling all kinds of supplies for 
people, and after that people came 
from far and near on both sides 
of the river to cross. Friday Her- 
man Ryle drove his auto cross ana 
back, which was probably the first 
time an automobile ever crossed 
the Ohio oh the ice. Saturday 
two machines made flu- trip, viz • 
John Ryl^'s, of this place, and 
Carroll Steuver's, of Rising Sun. 
The rain, Sunday, made the. ice 
unsafe for crossing. 



AOTBTROr 

For River Mail Route I* Plan to 
Be Inaugurated! By Gorem- 
ment for Cincinnati-Lou- 
isville Service. 



ma.: 
and 



son is 



HEBRON. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

Mrs. E I. Rouse is sick. 

Kenneth Cl-yton moved to Mike 
Dye's residence last week. 

W. H Clayton has moved from 
Flemingsburg to his home here. 

Jacob Fleet recently moved to 
t hg Ed. Er nst residence near here 

Frank 'A V16r aftfl Wife were the 
In 



Solon Ryle's youngest 
sick. 

Miss Sophia Weisickle is (mile ill 
at Jake- Cook's. 

Benj. Scott and Kenneth Ryle 
went to Cincinnati Monday. 

R. C, McNeely and wife went to 
Cincinnati, Tuesday, for a two 
days' visit. 

Miss Ruth Griffin, of Erlanger, 
returned Monday to resume her 
school at Maple Hill. 

Mrs. Alice Clements, of Hataha- 
way, is visiting her mother, Mrs. 
Lucy Scott, who has been sick. 
' Herman Ryle took a truck load 
of hogs belonging to Mit Kyle 
and Ed. Sullivan, to Cincinnati, 
Monday. 

Mrs. Anabel Brady and son vis- 
ited her mother, Mrs. Harriet Wal- 
ton, who has been quite sick. Jasi 
Smith brought them in his auto. 

To reach his school at Rising- 
Sun, Monday, Geo. Walton had to 
go via Burlington, Cincinnati and 
Aurora, as the rain had rendered 
it unsafe to cross on the ice 



For Sain— it 80-pound shoats ana 
a fresh cow. Eli Conrad, Florence, 
R. D, 1. 

For Sale— Good Jersey cow with 
fourth calf. Mandn Koons, Burling- 
ton R. D, SL 

. ■ 



For Sale— Five months old O. 1 
C. boar Registered stock. Frank 
Hammond, near Llmaburg. 



For Sale— White Holland turkey 

gobbler. Apply to Mrs A. W. 
ainea, Burlington. Phone 76-x, 



NOTICE-I will not be respon- 
sible for debts other than my own. 
Thomas W. Nettles, Burlington R 
D.J 

Lost— On pike -between the Geo. 
Rouse bridge and Florence, a large 
fur glove. Finder will please .re- 
turn to this office. 



Miss Goldie Bruce is boarding in 
Aurora and wo-king in Lawrence 
burg. 

Mrs. Ed, Larrikin visited her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Vories, in Aurora, last 
week. 

Will Chambers, of Los Angeles, 
California, was here during the 
holidays. 



Alfred Chambers and Mrs. Milo 
Atkinson visited their mother here 
during the holidays. 

A number of people here have 
been cutting down their shade 
trees for wood, owing to scarcity 
of fuel, t 

Bro. Wood received a nice Xmas 
gift, some money and a box of 
truit, off of the tree at the Bap- 
tist church. > 

The Baptists had an entertain- 
ment and tree also treat for the 
Sunday school on Christmas eve, 
which was enjoyed by all. 

Mrs. Linnie Howard had with her 



•♦♦«♦♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

♦ ♦ 

♦ UNION. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

J. T, Bristow's little son, James, 
has pneumonia. 

Ezra Blankenbeker has been ill 
the—past week. 



Mrs. Lute Tanner spent a few 
days, last week with Mrs. Lizzie 
Aylor. 



guests of her parents at Frances- 
villo Sunday. 

•Mr. and Mrs Carl Bradford are 
entertaining a little son, born on I ♦ 
24th of December. * 

Milton Aylor and wife spent. 
New Year's day with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs James Barlow. 

Walter Hafer and family, Allie 
Walton and family and Thos. Ha- 
fer and wife, spent New Year's 
day at Phelps Walton's. 

Sunday scfiool Sunday morning 
at 10 o'clock this year instead of 
afternoon as heretofore. Church 
services at 11 o'clock on the 3rd 
Sunday morning of each month. 

The annual congregational meet- 
ing was held at the church last 
Saturday. Reports of the past 
year were read in the morning. 
At the noon hour a nice dinner 
was spread which was enjoyed by 
all. In the afternoon the fol- 
lowing officers were elected ana 
reelected : 

Elder— R. C\ McGIasson. 

Deacons— Henry Getker and O. 
C. Hafer, 

Trustee— Webb McGIasson. 

Choir/ster— O. C Hafer. 

Asst. Choirister— Mrs O.C. Hafer. 

Secty.— Mrs Jessie Hossman. 

S. S Supt.— Harold Crigler. 

Asst. Supt,— O. C. Hafer. . 

Secty.— Miss Gladys Regenbogen 

Treas.— Robt McGIasson, Jr. 

Mrs. Jennie Craven, who han 
lived here for many years but had 
recently moved to' Erlanger, died 
at her home there Thur s day night 
Dec. 27 She leaves a husband, one 



BUCKEYE CORNER. 



ianta, there to train. He enlistea 

in the aviation corps last summer. 

Sam Davis' home was burned to 

daughter, father and" mother" "'and JJf h *%£?*$ %?**L Z"r g I De °' 
sisr'.m wVin ™-iii „. ,fi„ „,;,,„ u«« > <Ji>m. me origin of the fire is .-un- 

She- "alteJ, ^h f^ y nT-M^^rf- k . nown ' but *¥ * eneral supposU 
?hter of Mr7aTite tTon ^ it cau?ht from the KH new 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
♦ ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mif-.srv* Edna and LetUe Rider 
spent Monday and Tuesday' with 
Miss 1 Georgia Smith at Hamilton. 
Miss Ida Mae Moore, of Big 
Bone, spent several davs last week 
visiting her sister, Mrs. Lewis 
Rvle. 

Mrs. Thomas Ross, who spent 
Christmas week in tho city visit- 
ing her relatives returned home 
Friday. 

Alfred Brown entertained the 
young people with a dance, Wed- 
nesday night, and Ceberrv Allphin 
with a dance Friday night. 

Born, on the 16th ult., to Chas, 
Dailey and wife, a nine yound boy. 
On the 1st inst., to Chas* Marks- 
berry and wife, a six pound bov. 
Mrs. Roy Stewart left last Tues- 
day for Louisville where she will 
spent several days with her hus- 
band, who is one of the seleetives 
there. 

Chas. Marksberry and wife mov- 
*d to Berkshire last week, and 
Boone Robinson, of that place, 
moved into the house he just va- 
cated. 

Lloyd D. Miller, who has been 
visiting here for -several weeks, 
was called by the government and 
sent (to an aviation field at At 



the 
in 



sympathy of this community 
their cad loss. 



tivea in Covington, 
for Christmas dinner Mr. and Mia Rev. S, T. Hfll and wife areJ Itak- 
Burgess Howard and Mrs. Amanda ing a vacation, Mr. Hill visiting in 
Jarrell, that being M-s. Howard's New York, and Mrs. Hill visiting 



Mrs. Geo; Rouse, of Florence. She 
was 52 "years of age. Funeral ser- 
vices were conducted bv Rev. Roy 

James Head and wife and Mrs. er at Hebron church, Sunday, Dec. 
J. C Bristow spent last Saturday 30th, at 1 o'clock. The family have 
in the city, shopping. 

Mrt. Joe Huey and children, of 
Burlington, spent from Wednesday 
until Saturday ih this vicinity. 

Rev. E W. Wilson, of Lexington, 
State Evangelist, will preach here 
the second Sunday at 11 a. mi, and 
7 p, m. 

J. L Frazier and Misses Nannie 
and Anna Mae Bristow spent last 
.Saturday and Sunday with rela- 



birthday. 



NOT IN MERCHANTABLE 
CONDITION WHEN DELIVERED. 
Those who bought tobacco are 
objecting to the condition in 
which the growers have been de- 



her parents in Memphis, Tenn. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

♦ ♦ 

♦ PT. PLEASANT. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



Wantted— Man to work on farm 
by month. Will furnish house, J. 
B. Sanders, Erlanger, Ky„ R. D. 1. 
Consolidated phone 381-x.. 

LOST DOG— Black and tan fox 
hound with collar. Ldt, about two 
months, ago. Liberal reward W. H. 
Norman, R. D, 1 Erlanger, Ky. 

For Sale— Large gilt With two 
pigs, about moinh old, all in goon 
condition. Another gilt due. to" far- 
row 28th. J, E. Hall, Burlington. 



Wanted—Man to rent on shares 
farm of !().") acres, equipment, 
houso and garden furnished. This 
is a good farm and only amnions 
minded, hurdwoi kcr need apply. 
c. 8, Bolei, uiehwoo i, Boone Co, 
Ky. 



livering it, and are requesting" • Allie Darby came home tvx 
it in merchantable | Camp Taylor New Year's day. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦4 

♦ ♦ 

¥■ BEAVER ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Wm. Wilson has three No 1 six 
year old Jersey cqwb for sale. 

J. O, Griffith has been visiting 
friends in Warren county, Ohio. 

Claude E. Black, of Camp Taylor, 
spent his four days furlough with 
home folks. 

Geo. Weden Sleet has a good 
position, with the Street Car Co., 
in the city. 

•Mr. and Mrs Geo, W. Ossman 
spent Saturday with Mrs. Sallie 
Adams near Big Bone. 

Mrs. R E. Moore has been very 
ill with bronchial pneumonia. Di- 
li. E Ryle is attending her. 

C. C, Sleet, who was operated on 
for gall stone at Christ's hospital. 
Cincinnati, is expected home in a 



Mrs, John Delahauntv 



WANTKD-Min 

in river bottom land. Bora 

torn land fund h.d. hOU* 

nrwu fnfte, tad eow pasture 
AddTMit M B» Mce, Landing, 
Ky. tf. 



from 
that t£ey put it in merchantable j c » m P Taylor New Yet 
condition before delivery. It seems I Mrs - Harvey Souther r*n a 
that the stems are full of sap knifo bide through her hand, a 
which gives it unwarran^aole, lew , da ys ago. 

weight and is certain to result in Mrs. Amanda Tanner and Miss v 
damage. The buyers say thev Una P avo a New Year's dining f ow d. ay8 
bought the tobacco at verv high to a number of their friends anai ». J . 
price and think it is due them ; relatives. Lntertai^l 

that it be delivered in a proper '■ Horace Cleveland, a student of Sa^os^d^frSS wl? R ? ^ 
condition. It iB. hoped that the Translyvania Coltog*, Lexington, S„t Chl ^mas linfe'r 
growers and the buyers will come "Pont tho holidays with relative, 8*»>t Chnstmas dinner 
to an understanding and that no ; a «iJ friends here. I *. M, Jack nau ed four truck 

trouble will grow out of present 1 Harvey Souther and wife enter- l 1 °. a,1 1 H «" - m pound hogs for John 

conditions. ■ t tainodwith a watch jwrly Nk«-w- -!?U!«or, one ol lioone eoimty s most 

Year'B eve, in honor of her brother , successful hog raisers, to the city 
Raymond Kelso and bride ,RH t week. 

Elvin Walton, of Dayton, Ohio, Dr. Ryle reports a case ,» 
writes that he wan recently ma - iiia'.lpox at the turnpike construe 
hhwiff LA, Conner wan called I ried and has gone to*Texn*hav tion camp OB Mud Lick creek 
»* m * ,elh ' v ' ,sw Bclghborhoo* ,ng Joined the aviation eorpi. a coloi -d man having it. lie ha.-, 

iare Tuesday afternoon to takoi Mis*** u.nle, Geneva and Matv I , Ik*>u quarantined. 

SSnSi M-*n?Y """m ( 'i" y ' T' n "*' r ar " ■< h " mo ;,ff " r " W J- (1 With was turning tno 

off of Vi^iui Um w allc '' U , 1U ! ' M^eiMiiil stay with lh.-ir eonmr ol Helen »nd Oah ■&*«,,» 

.'"! <?i f . l>( , W».Vj?*»» "" waakKtg.Ni! aunt, Mrs. Hal Hihouae. of Ludlow Ludlow, » ihort time uao 7h .i 

l.U wnernaboutH It m*RM th.- . and Nteholn* Or»* Erlan»r. i>.ina«rted wli*»l mt, 

young man'N le U ih, reeuU | epent th. holiday- with ll^r*. wi»y IpUuiSJtTaflaS VhtT |R (. if- 



furnace which they had just 
stalled. Most of the househola 
goods were saved. Mr, Davis and 
his (family moved to Warsaw to 
remain until spring when they 
will rebuild. 



a IDLEWILD. a 

♦ a 

♦♦♦aeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee *e 

An excellent crop of ice has 
been harvested. 

E. Y, Randall's children have re- 
covered from the measles. 

A much needed rain fell last 
Saturday night, replenishing ponds 
and cisterns. 

Miss Maree Camp*>ell resumed 
her work at the Berkshire school 
house last Monday. 

Dan C. Pitman, of Cincinnati, 
spent the midweek here with his 
sister, Mrs. E O. Norman. 

Miss Euna Willis wa* in Peters- 
burg, several days last .week, in- 
specting the work don& by the 
local Red Cross Auxiliary. 

Carroll Cropper and Miss Maud 
Asberry have returned to Lexing- 
ton, after spending the holidays 
here with their parents. 

Huey Aylor, of Hebron, is haul- 
ing coal in his largo motor truck 
for people in this ami the Pet- 
ersburg neighborhood at $10.50 a 
ton. 



Vol \VG MAN OP LOUISVILLE 
LODGED IN JAIL 



of an injury r, 
J some time agi 



d t( 



bin head land'* brother »nd winter C. K 
I and MlM IrU T 



fith la gating « littlo reckkwttof 
lata. 



HAS NOT MISSEP. 

Tho mail has not missed arriv- 
ing in UuiUngton ilunn- :h bau 
weather, biu it bu oi u neceeait) 
txH'n considerably lehiint tun.- uu 
•evert! occaaioi 



(Sunday's Enquirer.) 
A new star auto truck 
routo between Cincinnati 
Louisville, via Carrollton, Ky., is 
to be established by the Postoffice 
Department at Washington, accora 
ing to information received by 
Postmaster Clore yesterday. Bids 
for this service wUl be opened 
at the office of the Fourtfr As?- 
sistant Postmaster General at 
Washington on January 10th, and 
the service is to be inaugurated 
February 1, 1918, and continue un- 
der the contract until June 30. 
1919. 

The proposed route will include 
the towns of Cleves and Elizabeth 
town, Ohio; Lawrenceburg, Au- 
rora, Rising Sun, East Enterprise, 
Markland, and Vevay, Ind.; Car- 
rollton, Campbellsburg, Newcastle, 
Simpsonville, Eastwood, Anchor- 
age and St. Matthews to Louisville 
Ky. 
Carrollton will bo the terminal 

_Iar_aiilo trucks, which will be 

operated between Cincinnati and 
Carrollton and between Louisville 
and Carrollton. Through mail for 
Cincinnati and Louisville and in- 
termediate points will be trans- 
ferred fromone line to the other, 
at Carrollton. One round trip will 
be made on each line daily, except 
Sunday. \ 

Three motor trucks of from one 
to two tons capacity will be re- 
quired for each line, " the thira 
truck in each case to be useci 
in emergency. Each bidder iB re- 
quired to submit bond for $20,000. 

GETTING DANGEROUS 

Something Should Be Done With 
The Crossing at Lima burg. 

It is now very evident that the 
bridge at Limaburg will not be 
put in this winter, and it is furs. 
*'-■««. "very evident that the cross- 
ing of Gunpowder creek at that 
point will be in a horriblb conn 
dition before many weeks unless-- 
something is done to prevent a 
bad condition from becoming 
wor se, and -it-is-- t ime the county - 
road department be getting busy^ . 
It should be remembered that the 
trouble at Limaburg is not merely 
local but that the traveling pub- 
lic generally is interested. It is 
claimed by some who have been 
giving the matter thought that a 
temporary bridge can be construct 
ed across the creek at Limaburg 
by using mater ial salvag ed f rom 
the bridge that was destroyed 
by the flood. They say the iron 
girders are in good condition 
and are long enouglTTd put the 
bridge a reasonable distance 
above the bed of the creek, ana 
by anchoring it a considerable vol- 
ume of water will be necessary 
to interfere with its use, which 
can be depended upon at all 
times when the creek is not car- 
rying (away considerably more 
than a normal amount of water. 
It is hoped that the present froaa 
conditions at Limaburg will soon 
be improved, especially as the 
people out there claim that it 
can be accomplished so easily 
and at such a small cost to the 
county. No doubt some of the 
funds necessary can be raised" ~ 
by private subscription. 

Thr> Fiscal Court took up the 1 
matter Tuesday and decided in 
short order that a temporary 
bridge at Limaburg is not needed. < 
If a temporary bridge at • that 
point is not needed why is »^j 
permanent bridge needed? 



both Houaea ol lh« Gen i >i 
M>mhiy wa« orgauised i>v the 
ministration s uuVy'tt 

I.>n» uik . It. ting 'he i> odd.ivtf 

lu.-i oi . .,-,i Li,-, i v 

whisk (ou l .i 

will como 1 n K ' 



Birthday Shower. 

A shower was given Mr. and. 
Mrs.- Frank Youell in honor of Mr^ 8 
Youell's birthday in which she re- 
ceived many useful presents, vtet— ■ 

Theodore Carpenter and wife, 
table cloth. 

Carey Carpenter and wife, table, 
cloth. 

Ben Northcutt and family, table 
cloth. 

Chas. Finnell and wife, Japanese 
cake dish. 

Benjamin Carpenter and . wifey 1 
Japanese salad bowl. 

Mrs. A, B. Carpenter, china Vat* ' 
ad bowl. 

Chas. Carpenter and wife, china 
cake plate. ' 

Earl Carpenter and wife, glass 
cake plate. 

Sarah Glacken, bon bon dish. 

Elmer Glacken and wife, nana 
painted vases. 

Willie Glacken and wife, dresser 
scarf. 

Rowena Carpenter, hand en*- 
broidered towel. 

Alice Carpenter, fancy hand 
pocket. 

William Carpenter and wife, 
pair vegetable dishes. 

Henry Carpenter and wife, Luge 
mirror. 

J. H, Powers and wife, set chain* 

Mrs. J, T. Powers, pair pickfo 
dishes. 

Tom Carpenter and wife, large 
clock. 

Henry Groger and wife, Rayo 
lamp. 

Walter Scruggs, granite atew 
kettle. 

Gus Williams, set teaspoons, 

Frank Stewart, set dishes and 
set glasses. 

Roy Cluster and wife, coal 
bucket. 

Clarence Tanner and wife, IB- — 

Douglas Rector, 3$ enntat. 

Lurile Carpenter, silver tooth 
pick holder. 

Wills Maud Carpenter, salt ana 
IM'nner shake. 

Gilbert Carpenter, AlaMKU» 



4t- 

rooker. 



heated del 



fel 

ol- 

the 

aim 
■nil 



the Mesial) 




John Wood Carpenter 
set silverware. 

k over the 
Hit ■dveHiaed in 
see what 
•ested t 



V** -* 



HTR&DAY JANUARY Mth, Ml* 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



«o.i. 



REVIEW QFTHE WORLD WAR AND OTHER 
HISTORY MAKING EVENTS OF YEAR 1917 



Entrance of United States Into Conflict Outstanding Development of 

Past Twelve Months—Political Upheaval in Russia Affects 

Struggle— British and French Smash Teuton Lines 

on West Front— Austro- Germans Launch 

Drive Against Italy. 



By DONALD F. BIGGS 

THE WORLD WAR. 



After throe anil a half years of the 



back to new lines which Lad been pre- 
pared. 
The relations between Germany and 



most sanguinary fighting in history. lhe Valted StHtt , s were furtber ^ tnln . 



the great nations of the world, togetb 
er with many of the smaller ones, are 



ed March 18 by the receipt of reports 
of the sinking of three American 



BU11 at death grips, with less prospect steamers, the City of Memphis, 

of an early «peac« than was thought to noig and Yigilaucia. fifteen of the lat- 

exist a year ago. , u . r - s crew Delng , 0Sk 

Undoubtedly the greatest develop-, 0n MarcJl L>1 PrPsIdeut wilson ls . 
meat of the year was the entrance of! saod u proc i !mmt i ou filing congress 
the United States of America into the ln KIwIai se ssion on April 2. 
conflict. The throwi ng of the tre- [ Tn<1 AmurU . aa hteamor Healdton 
mendous resources and man power of j Was tor|)edoed without warning. March 
the American republic into the balance j %, a meQ lndudhlg sev<Ml Amerl . 
on the side of the entente allies, in the f . ang U oing lost 



opinion of military experts, has more 
than off-set the advantages gained by 



United States Declares War. 

On April 2. President Wilson ap- 
Germany and her allies during the past i „.__, i„», « r . , ^ . Zt 

*_ , .. , . , ,., ! poared before a Joint session of cofi- 

twelve months and has made possible 



the continuance of the conflict until a 
time when a definite military decision 
can be obtained. 

} There have been a half dozen or 
more outstanding events in the past 
year. .Some of these have been of 
purely military significance und others 
have been occurrences of a political na- 
ture which, have Had a far-reaching ef- 
fect upon the titanic conflict. 

Chief among the political upheavals 
of the year was the Russian revolution 
Which resulted in the overthrow of 
Czar Nicholas and culminated during 
the closing months of the year in a 
counter-revolution which practically 
eliminated Russia from the ranks of 
the nations opposed to the central pow- 
ers. From a military standpoint the 
chief events of the year have been 
the launching of the German ruthless 
submarine campaign, which was dt- 
reetly-r esponsib le for the ent ry o f -thrrh 

United States into # the war; the Brit- "J!" *? w, l' lor « 01 mwe inan "t 

00*> p risone rs . 

The first American casualties in the 

war were reported April 23, when the 



cellor von Bethmnnn-ITolIweg and the 
appointment as his successor of Dr. 
Georg Michnelis. On July 22, Slam 
declared war against Germany, and 
I Austria-Hungary, bringing the number 
of the allied nations to sixteen. 
British Launch Great Offensive. 

The British launched their second 
great offensive of the. year on the 
Flanders front on July 31, attacking 
on a 20-mile front from Dixmudc to 
Warncton, nfter three weeks of in- 
tense artillery preparation. The Brlf- 
ish forced their way luto the German 
lines to a depth of two to two and a 
half miles, taking ten villages und 
more than 5,000 prisoners. 

Pope Benedict, on August 14. trans- 
I raltted peace proposals to all belliger- 
ent and neutral governments. 

The Italian forces opened a grand 
offensive on August 19, attacking on 
a front 40 miles long from Tolmlno to 
the Adriatic sea. On August 25, the 
Italians captured Monte Santo, an Aus- 
trian stronghold on the Isonzo front. 
Two more nations entered the war on 
the side of the allies in August. Li- 
beria declaring war on Germany Aug- 
ust 7, and China declaring wur on 
both Germany aud Austria-Hungary 
August 14. On August 28, President 



November a Premier Kerensky fled 
from Petrograd, and other members of 
the cabinet of the provisional govern- 
ment were arrested. On November 10 
the rebel government made Lenine pre- 
mier. Kerensky. at the head of a body 
of loyal Cossack troops, attacked Pe- 
trograd November 12, but was badly 
defeated, The bolshevlkl were appar- 
ently in full control of Russia by No- 
vember 22, when the Lenine govcrn- 
j ment proposed a general armistice to 
nil belligerents. 

American troops on the west front 
suffered their first casualties on No- 
vember 8 when German troops raided 
a salient held by the Americans, kill- 
ing three, wounding five and taking 
12 prisoners. On November the 
American patrol boat Alcedo was sunk 
by a torpedo and 21 were lost. 

During the last days of November 
and the early part of December the 
Germans made determined efforts to 
regain some of the territory captured 
by the British around Cambral but the 
British held a large portion of the 
ground taken, inflicting heavy losses 
on the C -Kuans. The Austro-German 
forces began u new offensive In Italy 
early in December, forcing the Italian 
lines back for a distance of several 



lsh offensives' on the west front, first 
In the Arras sector, later in Flanders 
and still later on the 35-milo front be- 
tween Arras and St. Quentin ; the Ital- 
ian offensive against Austria from 
Tolmino to the Adriatic and the sub- 
sequent offensive of the Germans and 
Austrlans against Italy, which resulted 
in the overranmng-of-florthcrn Italy 
by the Teutonic allies. 

The entry of China, Cuba, Brazil, 
Slam aud other countries into the war 
on the side of the entente allies, the 
overthrow of Kiug Constantlne of 
Greece on the demand of France and 
her allies and other events important 



press and called for a declaration at a 
state of war with Germany. On April 
4, the senate imssed n resolution de- 
claring the existence of a state of war. 
The resolution was adopted by the 
house of representatives April 6 and 
was signed by the president the, sanio 
day. At the same time 91 German- 
owned vessels in American ports were 
seized by the government. Cuba de- 
clared war on Germany on April 7. 
The following day, Austrin-Hnngary 
severed diplomatic relations with the 
United States. ■ 

The British forces on the west front 
began the first great offensive of 1917 
on April 9, penetrating the enemy po- 
sitions north and south of Arras to a 
depth of from two to three miles. 

The French forces launched an of- 
fensive against the enemy on a 25-mile 
front between Soissons and Reims, 
April 10, and after three days' fighting 



Wlgon-s reply to t in- p e e r e pron nsn l aj^ i^me points." 
Of Pope Benedict was mude public. It 
declared that "we cannot take the 
word of the present rulers of Germany 
as a guarantee of anything that ls to 
endure, unless explicitly supported by 
such conclusive evidence of the will 
and purpose of the German people 
themselves as the other peoples of 
the world would be Justified in accept- 
ing." Other allied governments later 
adopted President Wilson's note as 
their own reply to the pope. 

Early ln September the Italians eou- 
tluupd to make progress in their drive 
on the Isonzo front, announcing on 
September 1 the capture of 14 strongly 
fortified mountains, causing an 11- 
mlle breach ln the Austrian lines and 
resulting in the capture of 27,000 pris- 
oners. 

Chaos Threatens in Russia. 

Conditions In Russia grow more cha- 
otic during the month of September. 
General Kornlloff. commander ln chief 
of the Ruslan armies, on September 
10 demauded that all civil and mili- 
tary powers be placed in his hands, i 
Premier Kerensky immediately do- [ 

posed General Kornlloff and civil war | THE WAR CONGRESS 

Ihtcatened as Kornlloff. at <h* head 



Early In December It was announced 
that a large number of national guard 
troops from the United States had ar- 
rived in France, units from every 
state being included. On December 7, 
the United— States eongress declared 
the existence of a state of war with 
Austria-Hungary. The following day 
it was announced that the American 
destroyer Jacob Jones had been sunk 
by a Germnn submarine with a loss 
of 64 men. 

The Russian situation was further 
complicated by a new revolt against 
the bolshevlkl government launched 
by Generals Kaledines and Kornlloff, 
Cossack leaders. 

British, French and Italian troops on 
December 10, captured Jerusalem, 
which for 673 years has been uuder the 
undisputed sway of the Moslems. 

On December 10, it was announced 
that Russian and Teuton emissaries 
had signed a four-weeks' armistice, one 
provision of which was that pence ne- 
gotiations should begin Immediately. 



February 3, 30 were killed and 314 
hurt ln a ship explosion at Archuugel. 
On the same day an explosion at Yo- 
kohama killed 100. On February 21, 
the British transport Mendi was sunk 
In a collision, 025 South African la- 
borers being lost. 

On March 11, a tornado la east cen- 
tral Indiana killed more than 20 per- 
sons and on March 23, 38 were killed 
and more than 200 injured when a tor- 
nado wrecked part of the city of Ncvr 
Albany, Ind. 

Explosions ln a Russian ammunition 
plant near Chester, Pa., killed 112 per- 
sons April 10. An explosion ln the 
Hastings mine near Ludlow, Colo., 
April 27, caused a loss of 119 lives. 

May 22, the city of Gyoenyoes, Hun- 
gary, was devastated by fire. Thirty 
lives were lost and great damage was 
done by a storm in Kansas May 25 and 
the following day tornadoes ln central 
Illinois killed 150 persons and destroy- 
ed property worth millions of dollars. 
May 29, many persons were killed ln 
tornadoes ln southern Illinois, Ken- 
tucky, Tennessee, Alabama and Arkan- 
sas. 

San Salvador, capital of Salvador, 
and a number of surrounding towns 
were partlnlly destroyed by Tnlganlg 
eruption, earthquake and fire June 7. 
More than 150 men perished in a bias- 
ing mine at Butte, Mont.. June 9. Thir- 
teen were hilled and many injured 
when a water tank fell on the steamer 
Christopher Columbus at Milwaukee, 
Wis., June 80. 



armed American tank steamer Vacuum 
was sunk by a submarine and several 
American gunners were lost. 

American Fleet In Action. 
It was learned on Muy 10, that a 
o f Amer ican— d e stroyer s un 



dor Renr Admiral Simtns had safely 
crossed the Atlantic and had beta pa- 
trolling the seas- in war service since 
May 4. 

The t'nlted Sta»s army draft bill 
became a law May 18 when President 
WIlsou affixed his signature to the 



ln themselves were overshadowed bv j measure and issued a proclamation fix- 



the greater developments of the year. 
American Peace Effort Fails. 

As the year opened the only military 
movements of importance in progress 
were those aimed by Germany and her 
allies to complete the annihilation of 
Roumania and attention was centered 
upon the request that had been made 
by President Wilson that the various 
belligerent nations stale the terms up- 
on which peace might be discussed. 
The replies seemed to preclude any 
further actloh by the United States ns 
a peacemaker, but on January 22 Pres- 
ident Wilson in nn address before the 
senate laid down the principles which 
he declared should guide the United 
States ln participating in a league to 
enforce peace ut the dose of the pres- 
ient war. 

On January 31, Germany announced 
the inauguration of ruthless submarine 
warfare. 

President Wilson acted promptly, 
severing diplomatic relations' .with 
Germany on February 3. 

The Cunard liner Laconla was sunk 
Without warning off the Irish toast 



ing June 5 as registration day. 

During the early part of June grow- 
ing unrest ln Russia began to attract 
the attention of the allies^ On June 1, 
workmen and soldiers seized Kron- 
stadt, the Russian fortress defending 
Petrogrnd, and repudiated the provis- 
ional government. On June 3, the 
American conhnissiou to Russia, head- 
ed by Elihu Root, and the American 
railroad commission, headed by John 
F. Stevens, arrived safely at Russian 
ports. On June 7, the Russians in 
possession of Krohstadt yielded to 
negotiations and recognized the pro- 
visional government. 

In the meantime the American prep- 
arations for the war were proceeding 
rapidly. On June B, nearly 10,000,000 
mcn.of military age registered for mili- 
tary service under the selective draft 
law. On June 8, Major General John 
Jr P e r sh i n g, who ImtLbeen selected to 
head the American expeditionary 
forces In France, arrived with his. staff 
In London. On the same day Wash- 
ington reported the safe arrival in 
France of 100 American aviators, tho 



of a large force of troops, marched on 
Petrograd. The rebellion collapsed, 
however, on September 13 when 
General Kornlloff agreed to surrender 
to General Alexieff, chief of staff of 
the Russinn army. 

Tho first American casualties In 
France were announced on September 
4, when four •Americans were killed 
i n n Ge r man 



t 



ts 



February 25 with the loss of 13 lives, ! first American fighting forces to reach 



Including those of two American worn 
en. 

On February 28, it was announced 
: that the United States government was 
to possession of a communication ad- 
dressed by the German foreign minis- 
ter to the German minister ut Mex- 
ico City, Instructing him to pro- 
pose an alliance between Germany 
and Mexico, and to suggest that 
as soon as war with the United States 
Was certain, the president of Mexico 
communicate with Japan, offering to 
mediate between Japan and Germany. 
As a reward Mexico was promised gen- 
eral financial support from Germany 



that country. 

King Constantlne Dethroned. 
A solution of the Greek situation, i 
which had endangered the operations 
of the allies in the Balkans, was reach- 
ed June 12 when on the demand of 
Fiance, Great Britain and Russia, King 
| Constantlne abdicated in favor of his 
' second son. Prince Alexander, who was 
I known to be favorably inclined toward 
; the allies. London reported another 
< big ruld by Zeppelins on June 13, in 
J which 157 persons were killed and 
I many Injured. 

The subscriptions to the first Ameri- 
can Liberty loun closed Juue 15, the 



and the reconquest of lost territory iu ■ ,oun bcln * { oversubscribed by $750,* 



Texas, New Mexico and Arizoua 
' The United States department of 
state announced, March 12, thut it 
bad determined" to place armed guards 
upon all American merchant vessels 
Bailing through the German war zone. 
March 14, It was learned that tho 
Amerlcun steamship Algonquin hud 
been sunk without warning by a Ger- 
man submarine. On the same day 
i'hine severed diplomatic relations 
.With Germany and ■•«-!/. . d German mer- 
tfaul ships in the harbor at Shtiu;rliui. 
Cxar Nicholas Dethroned. 



| 000,000. 

On June 28, it was announced that 
the first contingent of American troops. 
under command of Major Genera! Si- 
bert, had arrived safely In France. 

The new Greek cabinet, headed by 
Eleutherios Venlzrtos, went Into office 
on June 27 and two days later the new ! 
government seyH£d diplomatic relu- ' 
tions with Germany^ Austriu-Htmgary, t 
Bulgaria ;md Turkey) ' \ 

On the firm of July, the Russian ' 
fore--, under (he : hip : 

of War Minister Kerensky, electrified 



i March if>, , ivw.in- the-^Wm-hy hHwhi e g a p o w e rful »f 

ftMsry movement, wiudi iwd !>. 

With food riotM and < nil.. . culminated 

in the abdictiUon of « ar . ludu i < th 

^^KlWRelf ami lib )/i. Pending the 

^^Hhf Of a OOJIKtihi ut a nobly the 

M( WBS VC led lit lhe ox ecu- 

7&4"" ••'"■■ is and a 



• ' ■ I.-rf 



I ou Ull wr.»t 
»ef*n H twit nil 
»f M ntiee from 
fnllUa 



!'• 'i i\e on : m IS mITe' i'i-ih In i 
capturing many strongly fortified! 
tOWnS and tnklnjf limn ii ml . ut prig. 
Tor nw, weel I lUu tiUJ -inici 
ceiitliin.il iii leU.'iin -e along ii front 
With in d to U but i, ii July 

!*.i tbs t:u ,,,,] j 

ri id. Alton 
mutinied und lied, 

I oil Jills 

The iii.it |„, !iu, ill , rials la Ho I 
tniiii luliiniM during the wur resulted 

OU Jul) II III KL.tlleU of Chsu- 



lericannos- 
pltals in France. America's war prepa- 
rations were continued rapidly, the 
first contingent of five per cent of the 
new National army arriving at their 
cantonments September 5. 

The replies of Germany nnd Austria- 
Hungary to Pope Benedict's peace pro- 
posals were made public September 21. 
They accepted the pope's offer as a ba- 
sis for the beginning of negotiations, 
but made no definite concessions. 
Italians Driven Back. 

The great Austro-German offensive 
against the Italians was .launched 
along the Isonzo front October 24, and 
within ten days the Teuton forces had 
retaken all the territory won by the 
Italians, in two months*- fighting and 
had overrun all of northern Italy. 

The United States began to take a 
more active part In the fighting during 
October, the first American troops go- 
ing into the first line trenches in 
France on October 23. On October 17 
tho American transport Antilles, re- 
turning from France, was torpedoed 
and sunk, with a loss of 07 lives. The 
second American Liberty loan of 
$3,000,000,000 closed October 27 with 
mi oversubscription of nearly $2,000,- 
000,000. SeveraTimwe^South AhTefi- 
enh nations took a decided stand In 
favor of the allies in October. Peru 
broke off diplomatic relations with 
Germany October 6 and Uruguay took 
similar action the following day. On 
October 26 Brazil declared the exist- 
ence of a state of war with Germany. 

There were evidences of internal dis- 
turbances In Germany during the 
month, a mutiny of German sailors at 
Ostend being reported October 18. On 
October 30 Count George von Hertling 
was mude imperial chancellor of Ger- 
mnny, Chancellor Michnelis having re- 
signed. 

On the sea the chief event- of the 
month was the sinking by two German 
ralders^of two British destroyers and 
12 Scandinavian merchantmen they 
were convoying ln the Nsrth sea on 
October 17. On October 31 the Ameri- 
can transport Finland, returning from 
France, was struck. by a torpedo and 
eight men were killed. 

Italians Stop Invaders. 

Big events crowded fast upon each 
other during the month of November. 
The Italians, after reforming their 
lines back of the Tagliamento river, 
were forced to execute a further re- 
treat, falling back to the Piuve river. 
The Kalians, re-enforced by British 
and French armies, which reached the 
Italian front November 25, withstood 
repeated attacks launched by the Aus- 
tro-Gcnnnn armies, folding ihcir lines 
at all points ntontf the P»u vv, 

On November S9 1ht» B r itish opened 

QlC ■,:.!. I ..ll'i |l l\ e of the ye|i|' on 

the we i front between St. Quentin and 
the Brnrpe. In u inrpylsa attack, bf 

gun wlll.o.il lint KUHtt] artillery prupfl 
ration, ihe HritHh infantry under Geii- 
eriil l inled by n Ifirr;" force of 

tlinkn, •iiinii-lnil through lhe Illnil.li 

burg line toward Curobrul, taking many 
i und thousands of prisoners, 
llu , lain civil 

dtirhiK the in. mih bv u counter revolu- 
tion by BUtllnf of which tit- bolshevlkl, 
under tho leadership of M, Lenta*. 
e*Ued the povsranisat at t'«uo(rtd pa 



The first "war session" of the Sixty- 
fifth congress which opened on April 
2, was the most momentous session In 
the history of the United States up to 
thut time. 

The first war bill passed by congress 
was one authorizing the issuance of 
bonds to nn amount not exceeding .$;',- 
000,000,00 and authorizing the secre - 
tury of the treasury to purchase se- 
curities of governments at war with 
Germany to the amount of $3,000,000,- 
000. 

The army conscription act was 
passed by the house April 28 by a vote 
of 397 to 24 and by the senate ou May 
1 by a vote of 81 to 8. 

The first big war appropriation bill, 
carrying appropriations aggregating 
$3,281,094,541.00 for the army and 
navy, was passed ln the house Muy 2 
with one opposing vote and in the sen- 
ate May 19 without a roll call. 



age act, Intended to prevent disloyal 
acts on the part of residents of the 
United States and also containing pro- 
visions giving the president power to 
place an embargo on exports, was 
signed by the president June 15. 

A bill appropriating $640,000,000 for 
the development of the air service was 
passed without a record vote by the 
senate on June 18 and by the house 
on June 28. 

The food control act. uuder which 
broad powers were given to the presi- 
dent for the regulation of the sale of 
food and fuel, was passed in the house 
June 23 by a^vote of 365 to 5 and in 
the senate July 21 by a vote of 81 to 0. 

The second great bond Issue act, 
authorizing the issuance of bonds to 
the amount of $7,538,945,640 and war- 
savings certificates to the amount of 
$2,000,000,000, was passed In the house 
September 6 nnd In the senate Septem- 
ber 15. 

The revenue act, first introduced ln 
the house May 9, was passed by the 
house May 23, but was not passed by 
the senate until September 10. Che 
conference report wus accepted Octo- 
ber 2. The message provides for the 
raising of nearly $3,000,000,000 annu- 
ally, largely from Income and excess 
profits taxes. 

The second big wur appropriations 
act, carrying a total of $5,350,660,- 
016.93, Including $635,000,000 -additional 
for the emergency shipping fund, was 
approved by the president October 0. 

The second session of the war con- 
gress opened December 3, and the fol- 
lowing day President Wilson delivered 



A Niagara Gorge trolley car plunged 
into the rapids, July 1, and 28 were 
killed. A mine explosion at New Wa- 
terford, Cape Breton, killed 02 men 
on July 25. 

A mine explosion at Clay, Ky„ 
caused the loss of 31 lives on August 
4. Nineteen were lost when the Brit- 
ish* steamer City of Athens, carrying 
missionaries to Africa, was sunk by a 
floating mine on August 10. Eighteen 
were killed tn a trolley car collision 
near North Branford, Conn., August 
18. On Augnst 18, a disastrous fire 
swept Saloniki, Greece, destroying a 
large nart of the city. 

Many persons were killed in a ty- 
phoon and flood at Toklo, October 2, 
and a thousand persons were reported 
drowned in great floods In Natal, 
South Africa, October 28. 

About 1,200 persons were killed nnd 
millions of dollars wo*th of property 
destroyed December" TTBji r arTcxplosion 
nnd fire which followed a collision ln 
the harbor nt Halifax, N. S., between 
Mont Blanc, a French munition ship, 
and the Imo, laden with supplies for 
the Belgian Relief Commission. 



meusure. On May 19, President 1W* 
son selected Herbert C. Hoover, chair- 
man of the Belgian relief commission. 
as head of a food control board, anil 
later, on August 11, following the pass 
age by congress of a food-control bW. 
Mr. Hoover was made food admbtfs- 
trator. On August 21, President Wil- 
son issue 1 an order fixing tho bajslc 
prices for bituminous coal In the pro- 
ducing districts of tho country. On 
August 23, Resident Wilson uppolarted 
Dr. H. A. Garfield fuel udminlstratpr 
for the United States. On August Si 
the United States wheat committee 
fixed the basic price for the 1917 crop 
at $2.20 u bushel. 



INDUSTRIAL AND ECONOMIC 



Industrtni 
the United 



u n re s t wa s a pp a rent In 



States throughout 1917, 
largely as a result bf wur conditions 
nnd In spite of efforts made by the 
government, aided by leaders of organ- 
ized labor, to prevent strikes which 
would delay the nation's wur prepara- 
tions. 

Early In the year a nation-wide 
strike of the skilled railroad employees, 
which had been averted In 1910 by the 
passage of the Adamson law, providing 
indirectly for an increase ln wages, 
was again threatened, owing to the 



fact that the placing of the Adamson 
The measure known as the esplon- , Maw in operatloa wn8 de i nyed pending 



turn the United States aside from Its 
task until tho wur is won. 

During December both houses of con- 
gress opened far-reaching investiga- 
tions into the war preparations of the 
war und navy departments. 



DISASTERS ON LAND AND SEA 

The yenr l'.M7 uns marked by nnin.v 
disasters on laud and sen, aside from 
those itestilllng from the lm.<| mid 
naval operations of lhe countries at 
war. Thousands of lives were lost 
nnd millions of dollars worth of prop- 
erty wan destroyed by Ores, vxploslonti 
earthquakes, tornadoes and Other do- 
Ntruetlve u«eneleM In all purls or the 
world. 

Ou January ft nn < arlhquaka In tat* 

nioMit caused the denlh or 80U persons, 

On I.. i em tbipiake killed 50 

tin on Hull Nliind, Malay urehl- 

pellgo. 

On February 2, an eiphwlon and tire 
la u Chicago teueweut killed 2& On 



a decision by the United States Su- 
preme court on Its validity. The 
threatened strike wns averted March 
18 by the capitulation of the railroad 
managers. On the following day the 
United States Supreme court handed 
down a decision holding the Adamson. 
law constitutional. 

Serious troubles were precipitated ln 
the Arizona copper fields July 1 when 
the miners struck. Disorders were re- 
ported from several points and on 
July 12 the people of Blgbee, Ariz., de- 
ported 1,200 members of the Industrial 
Workers of the World, who It was 
charged had fomented the strikes in- 
the copper mines. On July 31, 32 I. 
W. W. leaders were deported from 
Gallup, N. M. On August 1, Frank Lit- 
tle, L W. W. leader, who had been 
prominent in the Arizona troubles, was 
lynched at Butte, Mont., where he had 
gone to take part in a strike of miners 
and where he was alleged to have 
made speeches attacking the govern- 
ment. 

A serious tie-up of ull shipbuilding 
plants In the country was threatened 
ln August and September. Machinists 
and bollcrmakers ln Eastern ship- 
yards went on strike August 21 and 
25,000 skilled mechanics and other 
workmen struck tn Sun Francisco Sep- 
tember 17. On September 20, Presi- 
dent Wilson nnmed a commission, 
beaded/ by Secretury of Labor Wilson 
and representing both employers and 
employees, to net as his personal rep- 
resentatives in allaying labor troubles 
during the war. The strike In the San 
Francisco shipyards was ended Sep- 



a message declaring that nothing will J tcinber 26 through the efforts of the 

government mediators. 

Lenders of organized labor in the 
United States took a decided stand 
throughout the yenr in support of tho 
government preparations for war aud 
ugainst antiwar propaganda. At tho 
annual meeting of tho American Fed- 
eration of Labor In Buffalo In Novem- 
ber, union labor pledged Its solid sup. 
port to lhe government In fl/i- prosecu- 
tion ut the war. 

The rullrouda of the. c.iuntry faced 
another crisis during the closing 
months Ox the yenr win n demands 
were made by the four brollicibouds 

for wage Increases averaging lo per 

cent, alfeclliiK, directly und Indirectly, 
approximately L\U<H),tX)fr railroad em- 
ployees. '■ ' " ; 

I.nbor troubles of the yenr were 

closely allied with sconomlc develop" 

ineiilH, growing mil of the l| 

coat of living iu the United It a tee. lo 
order to prevent further Increases In 
prices government rsfulatlaa of innuy 
industries was undertaken ns u wur 



DOMESTIC AFFAIRS 

The Danish West Indies, purchased 
from Denmark for $25,000,000, passed 
under the Jurisdiction of the United 
States January 27, and were renamed 
the Virgin Islands. 

Serious race riots ln Bast St Louie, 
Mo., July 2, resulted In the killing ef 
more than 20 negroes and two white 
men and a heavy property loss by ftre. 
The riots were followed by prosecu- 
tions by state officials and a congres- 
sional investigation. 

Soldiers of the Twenty-fourth V. S. 
Infantry (colored) started a race riot 
at Houston, Tex., August 23, resulting 
ln the death of 15 whites and several 
negroes. 

Interest in the general elections on 
November 6 was centered in Mew 
York and Chicago, where SoclaaV<t 
tickets were defeated by large majori- 
ties. Judge Hylan, Democratic nomi- 
nee, was elected mayor of New Uork 
over fusion. Republican and Socialist 
candidates. 

In Milwaukee, Wis., November 23, 
ten policemen and a woman were kill- 
ed by the explosion of a bomb found! 
ln a church and taken to police head- 
quarters. 

Thirteen negroes, convicted by court 
martial of partlclpatlpg ln the rac« 
riots at Houston, Tex., August 23, were 
hanged at San Antonio, December 11. 
Forty-one others were given life sen» 
fences. 

The house of representatives, on De- 
cember 17, adopted a resolution, al- 
ready adopted by the senate, submit" 
ting to the states a constitutional! 
amendment for nntlonnl prohibition. J 



MEXICO AND UNITED STATES 

The friction between the United 
States nnd Mexico, which had threat* 
ened for two years or more to result 
ln open warfare, began to disappear; 
early ln 1017 and when the atten- 
tion of the people of the United States 
wus focused^ up on m ore Important 
ma Iters by" the entrance of tfiaT 
United States into the world war, tha 
Mexican "crisis" faded from the publlq 
view. I 

Despite the failure of negotiations? 
with the Carranza government Presi- 
dent Wilson ordered the withdrawal of 
the American troops from Mexico and! 
on February 5, General Pershing and 
his troops marched out of Mexico af- 
ter having been In that country almost 
a year. 

On March 11, General Carranza was 
formally elected president of Mexico. 
From this time on conditions iu Mexi- 
co became more tranquil ana there! 
were evidences that President Carran-< 
za was succeeding ln restoring orderj 
in the republic. It was not until lajej 
in the year that Villa again became ac- 1 
tlve. On November 13, troops led by? 
Villa's aids, captured Ojlnaga, on the? 
American border, after a hard fight. 
Several hundred Carranza soldiers fled! 
across the border and were Interned* 
In ,the United States. 



'POLITICS IN FOREIGN LANDS 

A spirit of unrest wns apparent in} 
many widely separated countries id 
1917, leading In some cases to revolu- 
tion nnd civil war. The revolution ln 
Russia, resulting In the abdication of 
Czar Nicholas and the forced abdica- 
tion of King Constantlne of Greece 
"Were events closely allied with the 
war. Disturbances ln China, Including 
an attempt to restore the monarchy, 
were Influenced partly by the war< 
Conditions In China were unsettled un- 
"t II June 30, when under the Influence 
of monarchists, Hsuan Tung, Manchut 
emperor, announced his resumption of 
the throne of China. Civil war Im- 
mediately broke out and on July 10 
the attempt to restore the monarchy 
collapsed. On July 13 the monarchist 
nrmy, led by Chang Hsun, surrendered 
after a battle at Peking. The repub- 
lican government was firmly establish- 
ed again and later declared war on 
Germany and Austria-Hungary, 

Civil war In Cfiba threatened to dis- 
rupt that country during the early 
months of the yean The. rebels were 
badly defeated In several engagements 
and on March 7, Gomes, their leader, 
was captured. The rebellion was. 
stamped out quickly after the capture 
of Gomes. 

Great Britain continued to wrestld 
with the Irish problem throughout the 
yenr. The Irish nationalists, on March 
7, demanded immediate home rule and 
marched out of the house of commons 
ln n body. On July 25 a convention 
proposed by Premier Uoyd GeorgeTinG 
representing nil factions In Ireland met 
for the purpose, of drafting a homo 
rule constitution for Ireland. 

Rome mhnndorstntidlngs between 
the United Stales, and Japan over far 
Knstern matteta were cleared away by 
the sIciiIiik by diplomatic representa- 
tives of the two countries on Novcm- 
bex 2 of- an agreement by which Mih 

United Stfltci recogntaag the fact that 
.litpun bun special Interests in China 
r its proximity bur guaran- 
teeing the territorial lottfrltj 

OhlM und (tie uinlntcmiiK'c of th* ..p«a 
door policy In thut couiUrjr. 
H ..l.yrt.ht IH* by ih» MWhSl NtWSM* 
»4U S>MUi«t*l 






i jtms - -wr « 



iSfegBfeii 



BSJBBBBJBJBBBJBB 



assssaaoooosBOHoaooBBOBBi 



xxxxm 




BOONE COUN 






Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JA* 



OVERFEEDING. 
* Sin of gluttony is common, and, 
ore much condoned, but like ev- 
other violation of nuture'g laws has 
Penalty. Fat, Inefficiency, sluggish 
ty, the reddened note, the 
ed face, certain of the chronic 
eruptions and much fatigue and 
ttrvoosness are due to the abuse of 
the digestive apparatus. Rich, Indi- 
gestible foods In large quantities, high- 
fir seasoned to stimulate the jaded pal- 
ate, are forced into a body already 
- rebellious from repletion. Exercise is 
largely limited to 'Walking to and from 
the table and bodily deterioration pro- 
ceeds rapidly. Many an overfed dys- 
'peptlc, suddenly dragged by the stern 
Band of circumstances from a life of 
jghysical ease and plenty and forced to 
ja^k_out,9f doom, suddenly discovers 
;that his semi-invttlidism has gone, that 
a chronic skin derangement of many- 
years' standing has disappeared and 
that a new vigor and zest of life has 
been given him. Not everyone can 
spend his whole time In the open air, 
tot a certain amount of exercise and 
plain, wholesome food In an amount 
not exceeding the body's needs can be 
had by almost everyone. Simple, mo4r- 
erata diet and exercise make for health. 
These are not faddish food theories, 
bat are lust plain common sense. 





i 



At the meeting of a medical asso- 
i elation recently In Chicago one of the 
.physicians present urged the painless 
'putting to death of . the aged,' Infirm 
'and suffering. But the survival of the 
jltiest is by no means a new doctrine. 
,The ancient pagans developed it to its 
JtoU extent, and It flourished until the 
advent of a civilization which opposed 

!tbe brutal doctrine, which find* its 
legitimate expression in the present 
world war, that the weak have no 
rights w hich the aUuug are ttormirto 
respect. The so-called humanity of 
thl8 theory Is reflected In the German 
defense of the atrocities used in the 
war as "humane" because they tend to 
shorten Its duration. 



) Land is the only article of value 
which has not greatly Increased in 
price In the last year. Land is sure 
to doable In value within the next two 
'years. And with the ending of the 
war and the realization that the farm- 
er is the only man who Is dependent 
of high prices there is sure to come 
a rush to the farm that will put all 
{good agricultural land in the nclgh- 
iborhood of $200 an acre. It will be 
to© late then for the average man to 
{get a home on land of his own. And 
the first duty of a man to Ids wife and 
children Is to give them a roof of their 
own on land of their own — a place that 
may forever be known as home. 



Millions of pounds of edible mush- 
rooms rise and fade nwny each year 
without doing any good to anybody. 
It is both a patriotic duty and a gas- 
tronomic delight to cat mushrooms. 
.The best way to tell which are mush- 
jroems and which are toadstools is to 
;keen~n hungry cat. Of course it is 
{necessary to renew the cat from time 
to time. 



About The Toughest Period of 
Weather Ever Experienc- 
ed In this Section. 

Comfort* Disappears From Near- 
ly Every Home. 

About noon last Friday snow be- 
gan jailing and by two- o'clock it 
was coming down thick and last. 
At dark it was several inches deep, 
the wind had begun to blow a gate 
andthtemercurwas on the tobog- 
gan.. The night chat followed was 
about as rough as any ever ex- 
perienced in this part of the 
country, and ,by aay light Satur- 
day morning the temperature haa 
reced ed about 40 dogrees, in seme- 
parts of the county thermometers 
registering as low as 24 beuow 
zero, while in Burlington 18 be- 
low was about the lowest. To 
keep comfortable in the house 
was almost impossible and the 
consumption oi fuel was given 
the limit. The telephone service 
was badly disabled, while the 
wind during .the night had made 
some of .the roads in the county 
impassable by piling up immense 
si ow driits that blocked all kinds 
of traffic. Stock waB suffering 
and the owners could sot give 
tho animals the necessary atten- 
tion because thev could got 
stay out in the intense cold very 
long at a time. The wind Friday 
nignt came from a little west of 
south and did not cease to blow 
until Sunday morning by which 
time the thermometer was reg- 
istering at zero, the temperature 
having begun to ascend about 
dark the night before. This was 
a very great relief, but the coda 
had entered the houses and it was 
with difficulty that a room coula 
be kept anything like comfortable 
any time during Sunday. 

Owen Rose, who resides in the 
Hopeful neig.hbo T .h o od, g ot un e a sy 
about his dairy cows last Satur- 
day, thinking they were about 
to freeze. He aatd tney stood 
with alt four feet as close togeth- 
er as they could get them, while 
long, heavy icicles hung from 
their mouths, the animals shiver- 
ed dreadfully. Mr. Ross expected 
to visit Jiis barn often Saturday 
night to look after the comfort 
of his cattle. 

Twenty-four below zero was re 
ported from Bullittaville neighbor 
hood SaTurday morning. At some 
points in the county thermom- 
eters were reported registering 30 
below zero, but they were proba- 
bly exagerating conditions some- 
what 

The weather is something fierce 
in this part of the country when 
the mercury is 15 below zero ana 
a stiff breeze is blowing, don't 
care if that breeze does come 
from a little west of south as was 
the case last Saturday. 

A person of ordinary weight 
could walk on top of many of the 
snow drifts, the 6now seeming to 
be of unusual weight and packing 
hard. 

Had the wind laid Saturday 
night the egg would have frozen. 

Leonard Kite, of Waterloo, was 
among the first to find out that 



In a Serious Condition. 

Towns along the Ohio river, ana 
especially those that have no rail- 
road transportation, have been 
hit hard by the fuel problem this, 
winter, ana in some of them there 
has been actual suffering because 
of the scarcity of coal. These 
towns had just began to feel that 
a supply of coal was near at hand 
when the cold weather came ana 
closed the river navigation, ana 
when the ice disappears their 
condition cannot be improved for 
some time because of the de- 
struction of coal ba rges 'and 
other craft necessary to the ship- 
ping of coal, while the demand 
of the factories in the large cities 
will require all the coal that can 
be floated for some time. The fuel 
outlook in many places is alarm- 
ing to say the least. 



BADLY DEHG 



Young Man Whorl 
Sanatorium Near ) 
Arrested Near' 

Waa Taken to i 

Thursday Afteo 
For Treatise 




hhrhh 



mi a ii •- 

Cm LnnUL 

ttfrid . f' i '! the Funeral 

Hebron I 



Mrs. Hettie Latimer Dead. 

Mrs. Henrietta Latimer, in her 
74th year, died last Saturday af- 
ternoon at the home of her daugh 
ter, Mrs. Bondurant Hughes, in 
Ketesville, Chariton county, Mo. 
8he was the relict of Charles L. 
Latimer and a daughter of the 
late «N. B. Hawes, of Burlington. 
Beeides several of her children 
she is survived by one sister, 
Mrs, Babe Riddel), of Burlington. 
The telegram announcing her 
death was received by N. E. Rid- 
dell Saturday night. 



SAY WHAT YOU WANT 

Missouri la Ready and Willing 
to Meet ail Demands. 




Tell Missouri what you want. 
Uncle Sam, We're looking for war 
orders, Folks back east say we 
don't realize the gravity of the 
war, It'B a fact. We've been so the father would 
busy growing war crops, we 
haven't had time for reflection 



Cal Ives Warreny of 
v. ho was arrested' by. ! 
ner one evening:.^ 
lodged in Jail 
was taken to 
ium laJt Thi 
young man is 
rangement of 
have resulted 
ceived when 
Hre while "H 
ington, being kn 
building". It was while" 
school at Lexington that 
cd the acquaintance, of Jtti 
ces Grant, of B«TlevJi^H 
siring to visit her he caps 
county after escaping IB 
institution where. Jl* W 
treated. The y 
condition soon 
and his presence/ 
neighborhood 
ble commotion 
was called to take ehargi 
He was equipped with J 
ous looking spring bbjrak 
and frequently referre** 
to which he expected to 
At the time the* young' wan* 
taken in charge by .the" shr 
his father was away from - 
on the hunt for nim, as 
certained by County 
who got in to 
pie in Louisville 
arrest was made; 
was informed by 



Useful Citizen and 
Be Sadly Mjssed. 

•ery large .crow*! 
gbhors of Char It 



!wB» 





] A tighter curb will be put upon the 
; foreign press In this country, and, 
consequently, hysterical shrieks will 
be heard denouncing this invasion of 
the freedom of speech. It may hav« 
been noticed how vigorously the law 
Is always invoked to protect abuses 
and violations of the law by attcu In- 
terests. 



Calculate we'll have plenty time 
for that after the war is over 
Just now we're interested in rais 
ing something that will stick to 
the boys' ribs while they're us- 
ing up that ammunition the east- 
erners are making. 

We've got a little stuff on hand 
now, maybe you could use, Re- 
member, you didn't get out our 
way until late last spring, ana 
it isn't as much as it might have 
been, We couldn't figure out Just 
what was best to raise, so we" 
took a' hiteh at everything the 
old farm would grow. This is not 
a potato country, but we took 
a chancd on 109,000 acres —about 
20,000 more than we raised last 
year. Then we put in a few oats— 
somewhere around 1,393,000 acres 
That wasn't much ovor 100,000 
acres more'n the crop last year, 
but oats turned, out pretty well 
this year, Guess they made 
about 40 bushels against 25 last 
year,. 

Understand .oats and potatoes 
are not in our line but wo just 
raised them anyway. About the 
time we'd got through planting 
them, you'd made up your mind 
that you needed a whale of a 
corn crop. Wo had in about 6,- 
775,000 aeros last year which aver- 
aged 19 5 bushels, so we decided 
to do a little better this year, 




ton immediately upon 
homo and take charge -j 
Last Thursday afternoon' 
oiunati detectlves,sav €W8 
oT the father, 
and got the prisoner, ' 
being too ill to mj|fca;; 
from Cincinnati to 
took only a •hdrt time to 
cover that the unforttai 
had enjoyed, more than the ordj 
ary advantages of life* aha "at in- 
tervals he will converse In a ve 
intelligent manner. He tea mat 
over |slx feet ttB> and his ; 
portions make him. one to be " 
od when imbued with the 
that possessed him.--' 




Judge Phel 
of his farm, t 



IEi 




lla^a^a^H 
arrU sloe*? 



To Ci 




m 



. , i but hands were scarce and we 
the weather was extremely cold, ! mtt , t get in but a 



\ The bride who perforated her hua> 
| band's anatomy with her gatt is report' 
led to be overcome, and with his In- 
destines punctured In ten places he is 
not entirely unoverconie himself. A 
i bride should always begin her offen- 
'slve with roltingplns, broomsticks and 
I the crockery, and work up to the heavy 
'artillery gradually. 



Still, even If it be true that women 
are making a success of men's work, 
!we think it equally true that multi- 
plied thousaucls of them are making 
a failure of women's work. Solomon 
tdtdn't suy. "Train up n poodle lu the 
iway he should «<>; uud when he was 
old he will not depart from It." 



An Interned submarine in .Spain. 
whose officers had given their word ol 
honor not to escape, flied in the night, 
creating a sensation When the flight 
i became known. The Spaniards appeal 
to be the only ones Who are not sus- 
picious of the brnud of honor "made 
In Germany." 



Some of our young men v. ho hav« 
been a Uttle backward In doing theii 
bit are now able to feel a warm glow 
of patriotism as they tell the girl thej 
did not bring up a box of <ho<oli»u 
because France needs all our surplui 
augur. . 



his thermometer going as lbw as 
24 below Friday night. 

W. L. Kirkpatrick froze one of 
his ears going from his store to 
his residence, last Saturday, a dis 
tanco of probably 800 yards. He 
had the ear covered and frequent 
ly put his hand over it. but it 
was no us?. He applied a hand- 
ful of snow to the ear and the 
frost was drawn out and ho has 
not felt any inconvenience from 

his experience so_far, 

Many people could not get fire 
enough in their grates or stoves 
last Saturday to make their 
rooms comfortable. In some in- 
stances the temperature coula 
not be raised above 45 degrees). 

Last Friday night was the long- 
est night Courtney Kelly, of Lo- 
cust Grove neighborhood, fever ex 
perienced. He retired at his usual 
hour but soon discovered it was 
too cold to remain in bed, when) 
he hustled back to the sitting 
room, where he sat up the re- 
mainder of the night in company 
with a redhot stove. 

When persons moved from place 
to place about town last Satur- 
day they went on a run, espec- 
ially when facing the wind to 
which heavy clothing waB no ob- 
struction. 

A great many flowers 4hat had 
been cared for successfully thru 
the previous cold spells were kill- 
ed last Friday and Saturday 
nights, .some of them being killed 
in rooms where there had not 
been the slightest freeze this 
winter. 

So far only one instance has 
been reported whore water was 
frozen in a tea kettle that was 
sitting on a stove In which there 
w as a fire. 

The blizzard that struck this 
part of the country last l-Viday 
niojht was the. worBt ever. The 
wind sent the cold into everything 
that was possible for the cold to 
penetrate and livestock that was 
exposed to it suffered greatly. 
The mercury In some localities 
was imported as low as M bolbw 
' zero. Thu rural mail carriers out 
from Burlington were unable ta 
make their rounds Saturday •"> 
account of thr* snow being badly 



little over 7,- 
525,000 acres But Gene Logan, 
your crop estimates man out hero, 
says what we did get in will av- 
erage around 35 bushels About 
0,000,000 bushols will have to be 
knocked off the total 263,000,000 
bushels because it was frosted 
Somt? of it is a little soft, but 
we'll feed it to tho pigs 

Speaking ol pigs, you wanted us 
to increase our hogs about 50 per 
cent- Well about twenty of us 
went out with some of the boys 
from the College of Agriculture 
to talk the proposition over with 
the farmers It looks like we 
will make the increase If we can 
get the brood sows 

Tou (asked ns to sow about 5 
per cent more wheat this fall'than 
we did last We've got 2,875,00ft 
acres That's about 25 per cent 
increase, We were afraid some of 
it might winter kill and so we Just 
put in a little extra for good 
while we had the teams hooked 



i 



It is demanded of oVoe^-djfrfOr 
b.icco and interested insurance 
agent ^hstfevery precaution 
used to prevent n| t JoeseS- onl 
bacco during the ypRmS^ 
year 1917 shows more money ] 
out by insurance ' 
looses on tobacco ih" 
States than was coin 
premiums. All" 
will be examined' 
insurance com j 
rubbish remo\ 
and lire walls Wit$. 4 < 
doors and window*' 
structed fretw4toljau3nfoge& : 
taining large ; tsjjjttes. ^ 

of storage apaee> t fa* l 
it difficult to select goef* 
houses in every case. it. is aaW, ■ 
but if the • lose "rattoofY lM^- 
aga in excessive the insurance 
panies affirm that the' arfsJOrl 
will be- felt by owners of ta 
co us well as- themselves. 



WAft UNTIL 1920 




■''"■' 



the total oTfeas 



ihe 
at Ottcet 



Sold to the Sinton Hotel. 

John P. Duncan has sold the 
duct of his poultry yard to 
Sinton Hotel, Ctacttfaati; ,Her 

"fee a/ 



ires having been listed" on. .am forstsU wBri 



T>Done>. "lints 
-iavfjro vomer 



^owe^the 



0V'Jflt«V* Mgfl 




uteg, labor saving ra; 
I kinds now inr use 
act nvoat ; all of 
leaylng las. 



severe 
, in 
ca- 



ll rift e< l ut 
roads 
The bUssard 
nut oot 



mm,., jiointH 

thai (i 



in 



thi' 



Friday 
rhowi 

» bau - 



i mi; coal 1 1 orn 

1'b'iiiHhing loca 






upi 

Now Uncle, if there's any of this 
stuff you can use,, speak up. We 
will be able to get along on a 
little lesf this yeir than last, 
binoe we Qiave about 750.000 fooa 
conservation pledges Folks say 
that's a few more in proportion 
to population than any other ' 
state has: 

We're going to help you more 
next year, so if there's anything 
else vou need, just let us know. 
Tell Missouri, Uncle Sam We'll fill 
the bill - 

Neck Broken. 

The body of Wm, Keith, ofMox- 
ley, was found dead on the Buck's 
Run pike, in Owen county, about 
two miles from Worthville, with a 
broken neck. He had brought a 
load- of tobacco to Carrollton, ana 
returning to his home ho drove 
around « snowdrift, the wagon 
wheel striking a stump, overturn- 
ing the wagon, the bed striking 
Keith on the neck, breaking it, 
and no doubt, causing instant 
death.— Carrollton News. 

A Venerable Lady III. 

MfH. ('Ion-, the venerable moth- 
er of Mrs. Ida Balely, of Hullltta- 
\ilb» neighborhood, Is in very fee- 
health. Nh« u ih«- lant mem- 
-.f tlu f.im,lv of .lonus Cils- 

this 



been getting daily 
number of eggs, n 
the very unfavorable 
success under tfach 
circumstances is due 
that he gives his he: 
ed attention, and has 
comfortable during all 
weather. Ho has a 
which are .seven dra 
pacity of each drawer being one 
day's food for his hens, and these, 
drawers are. so arranged that the, 
contents o f one is ready- for nse 
each day. When the ; contents of a 
drawer is removed it - is • refilled 
with oats and in just seven days 

thereafter they areln conditions *J gfea «*>? 

for use. He is looking . alter hisl : 
poultry business in a, very meth- 
odical manner. 



lay use in ..this age in which 
liee With tdtepfcone, rural 



iocs o t 



outlook Was Indee 
the Germans a 
the- year it brf*?h> 
toward the «md, 
happened to «Oi 
them, j Who- aasor 



Play 
nop 



perhaps in 
and eatsd 



three, years* ai 
the strain 0%. 
Uoea la handjfc 



r can*} «tthataw M 

liiicai apUiHHf 



Bluford W.. Ayjofirthe -north 
cattle man,' who was Visiting 
father, JamOB ;H.* "Ayior, 
wttfks ago, comp4itn>nted 
owned ^^illiam Ph 
aidfehbof-of. his- father, aa 
the finest ap. a of- beef cattle, 

he saw yj^ .fn -jhia county 




has been" 



for 




Somettiiofj Enormous. 

There is a tremendous l v< 
of ice in the Ohio river, 
when the break comes 
struction of property- along 
stream is going to be r~ 
enormous. It seems that 
ers |of the imperiled era; 
had sufficient notice of whatwill 
happen and they could reduce 
their loss .considerably in rtuny 
instances by removing machinery. 
It is not always best to let the 
tail go with the hide.- 

No Klok'comtne 

The mail failed to 
the city last Sunday, 
first time the mail h 
coming on Sunday ■fax 
There was no kick beoatt 
failure as the Weather Vf/OPi 
ly too cold for a uH 
out, although the trip j^H 
the day before and ^L^M 
er day. Whan possible 1 
Is sure to deliver Q« 
the Burlington ofl^H 

It HUOUetl liU 

of the day M«' 

ling a' 




rin^ig t 
oh his f annH 
idle a large; 
goea on the 

buiio?is. tha^^H 
I, with m» & 
», good m'onr 

h» .little, pet- 




M 



tUI 

of the 




Jailer Chark 

the e»U|5^Sw 

perlemae: Last 
got.aejKjy 
"reaatae ub- 
iarhte atbht, hu 

^MUrtaHM 

^ia^aB 




»^boy who 
place smothered, 
■tty : r one/iM| 

■ ■ ■ ■-...: 









NTT »1CQ»DH 



ALTON DEPARTIVfb.. T.*l 

D. B. WALLACE, Manager. 

Hand your news litems to Mr. to. B. Wallace at theWaUosJSotilta. 

bk> Bank and Trust Co. 's building. H* U *J*q aathorteetfteTre- 

cieve subscription* and collect other accounts. 



± 



John Lane of Ludlow spent part 
of last week here looking after 

his farming interests 

• • • • 

Jos, Pinley, of Georgetown, was 
here last Thursday looking for 
BOnae good mil It's 

• • • • 
Root W. Jones spent the past 

week in Louisville visiting Jiis 
brother Dr R. A, Jones and fam- 
ily 

• • • • 



John El Williams »who ia buying 
for the R, J. Reynolds Tobacco 
Company on the Lexington mar- 
ket spent Friday and Saturday 
here with home folks Mr. Will- 
iams states that the tobacco mar 
ket ii improving and will con- 
tinue to Improve as the tobacco 
gets in more merchantable order 
and the shipping facilities im- 
prove.j • 

I . ken J Stephenson who owns a 
Bedinger who has farm near Moriarity, New Mexi- 
co, writes that they are having 
beautiful weather there, being 
warm and pleasant, and they 
have had no rain or snow since 
August 15th The cattle look 
and they are brought 



Mrs John C, 
been confined to her home with 
a severe attack of typhoid-grippe, 
is much improved and is on the 
road to recovery 

• • * * 
Reese Shinkle, who has been ma- 
king his home at Montgomery, Ala 
bama,is here to make hia home 
with his jiftrents, Mr and Mrs. 
Charles Shinkle. 

The Equitable Bank and Trust 
Co has about $20,000 of the Lib- 
erty loan bonds on hand for sale 
to those who wish this invest- 
ment, and have various denomin- 
ations 

• * • • 

Thurlow ETones, of Stanford, 
Lincoln county, spent part of last 



week here visiting his wife's par- 
ents Mr, and Mrs. E, II Norman, 
and [wont to .Warsaw Thursday 
to purchase some mules 

Mrs B. C, Diers and little grand 
son Master Chas, Best left Mon- 
day for Paris, Bourbon-c o,, Mrs. 
Diers' going on a visit toner lit- 
tle granddaughter born to Mr 
and Mrs Chas. T„ Best on Jan 
11th 

Miss Jennie Lee Gaines who has 
been undergoing treatment at a 
Cincinnati hospital was brought 
home by her father Mr W. Lee 
Gaines last week and is much im- 
proved after the operation for 
appendicitis 



Mr find Mrs. J, M. Ratliff of i „„ 

Carlisle, Jiicholas-co , while here- Ba ^ nst <*«"etery 

last week purchased the fifty 



fine 

week from the praTrie- in let con- 
dition for shipping and butcher- 
ing Mr. Stephenson and his wife 
(desire to be remembered to their 
many friends in this quarter. 

Harry Tetrick'anS Miss Pay Cram 
were married at Great Palls, Mon- 
tana, December 26th The bride is 
a daughter of Mr and Mrs. W, 
H Cram, of Walton, and went to 
Montana several years ago to keep 
house for -her brothers, who had 
land claims there, and she r also 
taught a very successful school 
Miss Cram is a most excellent 
young lady, beloved by a large 
circle of friends here who extend 
their congratulations. 
* * * » 

Mrs Thos. Weldon, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Morris of 
near Walton, died last Saturday 
at the home of her sister Mra 
James Glore in Cincinnati, after a 
short illness from tonsilitis ana 
other complications. Her maiden 
name was Miss Grace Morris ana 
she was in her 28th year, and was 
born and reared near Sugar 
Creek, Gallatin county The re- 
mains were brought here and the 
funeral services held at the Bap- 
tist church Monday, after which 
the interment took place in the 



acre farm of Otis Plynn 
Bracht for $3,500, the sale being 
made by Geo B. Powers, the real 
estate agent 



Snowdrifts. 



his 



• • • » 
Mra John C. Miller spent part 
of last week in Louisville, visiting 
her aon. Pred Miller who is in the 
aviation corps at Camp Taylor, ana j*JMH»Mt if thS 
will go to Chickamauga Park for I fA"* 5 ^*? ^ ork 



James Tanner, Florence R D. 
carrier, has covered a portion of 
route every day this week 

• ••• 

Snow ball material will 6e 

th<> sun ever gets a 
on the present 



training Be is clerk of the corps lar £« cr °P of snow 

and has been kept busy dav and 

light. 



« i j • ••• 

Married, — Aionzo Underwood 
and Miss Norvell Bedinger at Bak 
ersfield, Cala, where they re- 
side. The bride is a daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Bradberry Bedinger 
and formerly resided at Walton 
where she was very popular with 

a, large circle. 

» • •• 

Mrs 



Ira Ryle and Howard Huey used 
a snow plow, Tuesday, on Ins 
Woolper pike and the Belleviow 
and Burlington pike, from Mr 
Ryle's to Burlington, putting the 
road in a passable condition), 
• »»* 



fhf Fourtttn Con- 

trete Proposals. 

President Wilson's fourteen con- 
cpete propotsiafe for peace upon a 
b i a 4 s °* J u *ti e -" k a nd security in- 
clude some which must bo adopted 
if peace is to b> reasonably se- 
cure and some which ought* to Ip 
adopted in order that the peace 
established upon a basis of prob- 
able permanency may be just, ant! 
some which are Utopian 

That there should be no econo- 
mic barriers between nations as- 
sociated together to maintain 
peace means among other things 
that there should be revenue 
tariffs instead of protective tariffs 
atd systems of exclusion and re- 
taliation Tho German protective 

if rif i „, an illus.rativo example 
Its deliberate plan has been to 
keep out foreign competition, ano 
under the pretense of providing 
work for German workmen has 
made them wage slaves. That is 
what such economic barriers must 
do and always have done The 
American protective tariff is an 
economic barrier against foreign 

°?,}L ntl ?f* . X* ther? is » con- 
siderable body of public opinion 
in America which is inimical to 
the removal of the barrier, Ante- 
bellum protectionists cited Ger- 
many's tariff as a shininsr ex- 
ample 

Former Ambassador Gerard who 
indulges in disquisitions upon econ 
omic matters in addition to writ- 
* n *V, a ^s* 01 ? interesting narrative, 
m his book, "My Four Years In 
Germany," recommends a protec- 
tive tariff in America after the 
war to build up certain American 
industries which are to replace in 
the American market products 
bought in Germany before the| 
war, but now produced in the U 
S as a rs-sult of the suspension of 
trade with Germany, In another 
page Mr, Gerard declares the Ger 
man wage earner under Ger- 
many's protective tariff "the most 
exploited wage earner in the 
world," Many Americans are no 
le J* inconsistent than Mr. Gerard. 
The reduction of armaments to 
the lowest point consistent with 
domestic safety," expresses an 
ideal which is the ideal or al- 
most everyone in America, but it 
Is a far cry from the proclama- 
tion of such a policy— even assum 
ing tho possibility of an Interna- 
tional agreement to rr>duce arma-j Notice is hereby given that I or my 
ments— and the execution of such | deputy will, on Monday, P'ebruary 
programme in good faith by J 4th, 1918. it being county court day, 

between the hours of 10 a. m. and 2 
o'clock p. in., at the Court House 
door, in the town of Burlington, 
recommends Boone County. Ky.. expose to public 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
described property, or so much there- 



Seeds that Grow 

is what you want when you buy ; seeds that have 
high purity and germination' tests. 

You can get weed seeds for nothing. We know 
Seeds, and we have the best connections in the seed 
producing sections of the country, which enables 
us to go direct to the section where grown, and get 
the purest and best to be had. 

Every bag of Seed we send out is tagged as to 
purity and germination according to the Kentucky 
PURE FOOD LAW, and you will always find our 
Seeds above the standard. Write prices and sam- 
ples and be convinced. We are now the largest 
m Northern Kentucky. 



United States Foo d AJftiinistration License No. G 1770. 



r ccde 



, umff& 



2» GROCERfES.FLOUR SEEDS. MEDIC /NFS 
f3-2/ P/KE ST. /S 20W.7™ST 



Covington, Kentucky. 

Phones South 335 and 336. 



Sheriff's Salt for Taxes. <&m- 5&&^&*s&&&^&z S * & ^$, 



•^«SNS^-»4B^®=2^»- 



When A B. Renakar arose Mon- 
day morning he found himself so 
(completely snowed in that he haa 
to hoist a window to get out and 
" ^, a -. B '_i? er , riD S a ? dd ?u#k secure a shovel with which to 



ter Miss Wa\a*iladya who 
been visiting her cousin » 



have 
H C. 

Stephenson in Kenton-co, left 
Saturday for their home at Esca- 
da, Oregon, They have been vis- 
iting tneir old home near Finer 
since August 

» *»• 

Q, P. Burris who has been mak- 
ing his home with John R Fea- 
gan in Kenton county, left last 
week for Lee's Summit, Moi. to 
take a position in the saddle de- 
partmenc of the Longview Stock 
Farm, a stock farm that contains 
about two thousand acres 
• •» « 

Judge Charles Strother kindly 
volunteered to care for the boys 
who have registered for the army 
service in the execution of their 
questionaires, doing r 'the~workwith 
out any charge, and he has been 
kept very busy the past 2 weeks 
as a large number from the sur- 
rounding country were sent ques- 
tionaires, | » 

^ % and Mrs. J, M, Katcliff, of 
Carlisle, Nicholas county, spent 
part of last week here looking ov- 
er some real estate with a view 
to buying a small farm in this 
quarter. Mr. Ratcliff was located 
in Louisiana tor some time in the 
cotton growing business, but he 
uses Kentucky much better as a go 
likes Kentucky much better as a 
location and general good condi- 
tions,. 



Died —Ira 



Harris, 



remove the snow so he could open 
his door;. 

• * *» 

.Sixty men with shovels were en- 
gaged Tuesday opening the road 
from tho Burlington and Flor- 
ence pike to the residence of Er- 
nest Horton, whose child died 
Monday night Mr. Horton lives on 
what is known as the R H. In- 
gram farm, about two miles from 
the pike 

• * * • 

I John J Duncan, who resides a 
couple of miles out on the Pet- 
ersburg pike, had a very undesir- 
able experience with the cold, 
last Saturday, and if his neighbor, 
Clarence Easton, had not come 
upon Mm the consequences might 
have been serious in the ex- 
treme Mr. Duncan was out look- 
ing after his livestock 

Bernard Gaines improved the con 
dition of the Burlington and Pet- 
er - 8 ,j ur £ pike ' Tues <iay. from Idle- 
wdd to Burlington by the use of 
a snow plow In some places the 
drifts were so deep that he could 
not move them sufficiently with 
the plow, and Wednesday the men 
residing along the road turned out 
with shovels and put the finish- 
ing touches on the job, and that 



road 



is now 



m fair . condition, 



the signatory powers, 

'•Impartial adjustment of colon 
lal claims with fairness to the 
peoples concerned" 
i! i?° ever y°iie's sense of jus- 
tice but effecting such adjust- 
ments-granting perfect good faith 
upon the part of Governments 
and upon the part of "peoples 
concerned"— In a manner mutually 
satisfactory as between the Gov- 
ernment and the governed would 
be millenial 

Covenants of peace reached in 
the open are desirable and upon 
moral and practical grounds may 
be demanded, but while diplomacy 
survives, while human nature re- 
mains unpurged of guile, intrigue 
will continue, and will laugh at 
regulation and agreements as love 
laughs at locksmiths 

The other proposals are 
practical 

Following Lloyd George's declar 
ation of the intentions of the Eur 
opean Allies, the President's terms 
go far toward clarifying the sit- 
uation, If they reach Germanv 
and Russia ungarbled they should 
be valuable to America in both 
of those countries, The Presi- 
dent doubtless has this in view, 

It is not to be expected that 
when the terms of peace finally 
are drafted the ideal of the Presi- 
dent of the United States will be 
realized in all of its details, hut 
America is behind the President 
and is willing to fight for the 
principles he advocates until the 
Toutonic Empires are forced to 
agree to the major provisions of 
his peace programme 

The present buaJnescs is to fight 
Making the terms of peace is a 
bridge to be crossed when we 
shall have reached a now distant 
river 



Why Patronize This Bank? 



~S 



i s.io 



;(.otj 



5. 88 



8.10 



«£ r »'1? S^ 001 * with ten horses 
attacfled and accompanied by 40 
men equipped with shovels put in 



gen of near Ryle, Gaiiatln"^; ^ $T& SKl^Mf ° Pen " 
B&tJSL*? home ,. ther e January! en « pike for travel When 
th, from_ v complication of die-! squad' arrived in Burlington 

old and in H><± „»«^ !t • , e , ..." 



eases 



"68 



Flor- 
the 
late 



zr »ss-ai-^?^S? JSMB-W** 



ton county, where the 
were laid to rest on 
Ho was a brotherinla 
Moore and Miss Belle Grubbs 
Walton , 



of an armv 



Married 



lie remains on the move About 25 BurUngton 

w^Fw*% lmen WG r fa the crowd a « ™» 

or ?L" ear ^ ^ ery man Uvin S along 
of the road between Burlington and 

j Florence A snow drift soon dis- 

nT„*7 w , | appeared when attacked by the 

Claude Wayland was grader and the shovel brigade 



married to Miss Kathenne Henry | 

army stationed at Camp Taylor, 
and after a short honeymoon re- 
turned to his command He is 



l 



Mra B. B, 

indisposijd 



Hume is very much 



Miss Irene Kirkpatrick has 7>een 
quite sick with tonsilitis the past 
few days * 



the son of Mr and Mrs. W\ S. 
Wayland and, has many friends 
here who extend to him and his 
pride their best wishes 

• • • * 

Owing to the very had weath- 
er conditions last Saturday no 
sale was held at the Walton loose 
leaf tobacco market tho there 
was a good supply of tobacco on 
the floor for the sale The next 
sale (will be held next Saturday 
Thft market is getting better as, 
the tobacco becomes more cured , , B B, Hume's face looks suite 
and the shipping facilities im- familiar in the Sheriff's office ov. 
pnrve, and the bu 4 »s indicate Dr a * tnc court house 
that the Walton m/^' will he 

in r 



All agree on this: There is no 
necessity for any more snow this 
winter. 

The littte baby of Mr and Mrs. 
Newton Sullivan, Jr, has about 
recovered with its recent illness 



as (rood a* any 
a number of the 
lonttottsd sales un 
of February so as t 
baceo an opportunity 
batter cagia and free^ 

sunSLXS: 



"^e Quite On account of so many of the 

.y»di» students being unable to come to 

IViulirtMIe town Tuesday, the High School 

H.iniftStO- waa dismissed for th« day, ana 

,„,. <oome Professor Cay wood took a Mhov.,1 

its and joined the force (hat was 

eg Ksmoving the snow from the Bur- 

lintton and Florence pike 



Thought Is Was a German Bomb. 

E E. Kelly had rather an ex- 
citing and unexpected experience 
at his store Tuesday about noon 
Coming across a can of tomatoes 
that was spoiled he threw it in 
the stove in his back room It 
had not been in the stove very 
long until a loud explosion re- 
sulted, bursting the stove pipe, 
turning the top joint of the 
stove upside down and throwing 
a piece of the ash pan half 
way across tho front room For 
a minute he thought his place 
had been attacked by a German 
airplain iNo time was lost tak- 
ing steps to avoid a conflagration 
which would have been under 
headway in a few minutes Smoke 
and (ashes filled the room and 
thosa who witnessed the explos- 
ion did not have to be asked to 
lend a helping hand towards 
clear ing away the debris 
- 

For Sale— Five 70 pound shoats 
R J. Akin, Burlington R, D. 1. 

For Sale — 3 thoroughbred turkey 
hens J. J { Tanner, Florence R, D. 

WANTED— Man to tend Tobacco 
in river bottom land. Sorai- 
corn land furnished, house and 
garden free, and cow pasture. 
Address M. B, Rice, Landing, 
Ky. tf. 



For Sale— Coming six year old 
brood mare in foal by draft horse, 
also a coming three year old colt, 
or will trade for a pair of work 
mules Lloyd A. Tanner, Rich- 
wood, Ky , R. D, near White Ha- 
ven Fi 



•arm 



♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

WANTED FARM HAND 

Married man to work by 
the month. Steady work and 
good wages. Inquire at Pal- 
lor Grove Farm. 

C LISTON riRMl'FLINO. 
TayloMport, Ky 



of as may be necessary to pay State, 
County and School taxes duo there- 
on and unpaid for the year 1917, and 
the interest, penalty and cost there- 
on. For a complete description of 
property see Assessor's book for as- 
sessment of 1916, at County Clerk's 
Office. W. D. CROPPER, 

Ex-Sheriff Boone County. 
Belleview Precinct. 
No. .s7t; Kelly, Elbert heirs 

34 acres land 

No. 9*7 Rice Heirs 

Lot in Belleviow. . . 

Constance Precinct. 
» I No. 1499 Clark, John B., nr 

2 lots in Constauce 
No. 1639 Parker, Win. R. nr 

Lot in Constance. . . . 
No. 1645 Peno, John 

9 acres and lot J«.60 

No. 1661 Phelps, Lewis 

85 acres land and lot. . 28.65 
No. 1711 Souther, E. A. 

53 acres land 40.10 

Florence Precinct. 
No. 1962 Conner, F. R. 

1 lot in Florence n.u4 

No. 2001 Dulaney, B. A. 

2 lots In Florence. ... 20.30 
No. 2116 Middendorf, H. J., nr 

10 acres land 21.10 

No. 2151 Rhodes, Albert, 10a of 

land near Keaton linn . 22.50 
No. 2170 Rouse, Ollie P. nr. lot 

on Florence & Union pk 4.14 
Hamilton Precinct. 
No. 2502 Richardson, J. M., nr 

9 acres land 4.00 

No. 2510 Rich, W. O. B., est 

24 acres land 4. 20 

Petersburg Precinct. 
No. 2671 Burns, W. 8. 

lot in Petersburg S05 

No. 2672 Burns, Hubert 

lot In Petersburg 7,03 

No. 2728 Gordon, M. L., nr 

lot in Petersburg 17.80 

No. 2762 Hoffman, Charles 

lot in Petersburg 10.90 

No. 2796 Klopp, Frank, nr. 

60 acres land 14,60 

No. 2803 Lawrenceburg Ferry Co 

1 lot near ferry 5.66 

No. 2S43 Peck, J. C, est 

lot in Petersburg 4.8O 

No. 2925 Tilley, Ralph C. 

lot In Petersburg 4.95 

Union Precinct. 
No. tlrtO. Rouse, W. N. 

lot in Union <t.S5 

Verona Precinct. 
JS T u. :J3»3 Kite, Mrs. Mattle 

106 acres and 3 acres . . . 22.55 
No. 3427 McKenzie, W. E. 

30a land on Verona and 

Grant county road 11.86 

No. 3429 Napier, Charley, nr 

2 acres land. 9.25 

No. 3498 Vest, Mrs. Eliza 

60 acres land on Walton 

nod Verona road 30.99 '• 

No. 3527 Webster, Carl 

16 acres land '^4.!!0 

Walton Precinct. 
No. ;',587 Adams, Mrs. Susie N. 

7a laud In Florenco pr^c ll.i 
No. 3588 Adam*, Arthur, ur 

1 lot 2.46 

No. .1088 Colston, Charley 

lot In Walton 9.11 > 

No. 8774 Hoppurtoii, Joo 

lot In Walton 15.30 

No. 3806 Johnson, B. M„ ur 

lot In Walton. 23.03 

No. 4219 Wilson, Roland 

lot— H>W taxes, 55.10 

1917 taxes, 6.20 10.38 
No. 1049 Youcll, Mrs. P. C. 



Because we render that personal service so much desir- 
ed by the man of small business and assist him to become a 
man of larger business. 

Because our service is just the kind appreciated by the 
large business man, as we can care for his notes and bonds, 
clip his coupons, collect and credit the interest on his notes 
and assist him in making investments. 

You may not be in a position to have much banking busi- 
ness and yet desire to take advantage of some part of our ser- 
vice; we ask you not to hesitate to let us know your needs. 

You are always welcome at this bank regardless of the 
size of your business. Call in and read our daily papers. 

We Pay Taxes and Interest on Deposits. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 



W.L 




Burlington, Kentucky. 
ROUSE, Pres. A. B. RENAKER, Cashier. 

The Tri-State Patron Says:- ' 

**No Thanks, Mr. Station Man, after cutting the feed-cleaning the stable- 
milking the cows and running the separator, I will also by my own rail- 
road ticket instead of paying you a FAT commission. If there is anything 
easy about keepiug cows, I want it myself." 

Every farmer should ship his cream DIRECT to the Creamery. - 

55 Cents 

per pound for Butter Fat week beginning Jan. 14, 1918 

The Tri-State Butter Co. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION 
License No. G-18152 

I 25,000 of the largest producers have found the Tri-State always dependable 
and most profitable. Do not let the Station Buyer talk you out of your cream 
and make for himself a profit of about 2c per pound or more. Ship US your 
next can or if you need cans, we will send them prepaid for 30 days trial 



/ 



4< 



r ^-X> r*-r4 Tfts 



- ■^^^^^■s^&-^r^^m^^^^^s^^~^^p^^ s ^ & ,. 




••♦♦♦♦•*••**•**•«)••«,«.*•,•.«.« 



Subscribe for the Recorder. 
Only $1.50 the Year 

Read Our Advertisements and Profit 6v Them. 



.ISO 



lot in Walton irt.ao 

No. lor.l B*-rry, John <uol) 

lot in Wall on . t! (in 

No. 41M8 Brown, Stove (col) 

MIKI tSXM, 16 75 

" m-j 101" taxes. tu*>, lotSjua u.7ii 

No. I<»77 Hmiour, Jen ni*, lool) 
.1 In Wslton 



$200,000 

Over $200,000 worth of property 
sold in last few months. Want 
more good farms to sell, after the 
holidays. 

G. B. POWERS, Salesman 
Equitable Bk. Bldg. Walton, Ky 



FO R SA LE, 

Khuil.i Uland Hod (loukurnls, fl.."*) 
a pises, Phone Beavor aon, 
o.m-lil Mra. I.. M. ROD BE. 

Take Your County Paper, 




For Sale-6 Good Farms 

Beokenholdt farm, l«3 acres $imhx) 

Pelsor farm, % acres h.ooo 

1)16 acre farm h, !00 

Tho ahovo farms have bent oT 
hnprovPinonf.fl.iarKH harm* and 
hou»«» with modern Improve- 
monts. 
00 acreH «<mm1 tobacco Inn, I n<-;vr 

Yorkvlile »,00Q 

>K)ai:ri> farm, woll loSAted B,3flU 

fiO aero farm s «jki 

AImo flrMt.nliiMM<lr«M>ndnh< propi 

Address 

V AltKKN TKHBS, 

J 111 " 1 i 1 ewrmcebuif, Ind. 



f 







BOONE COI'NTV RECORDER 



THURSDAY JANUARY 17th, 19XT. 



>f 



H QQeek'o J^ews 



Hubert White got hia face froz- 
en last Saturday 



J now has been in 
about six weeks. 



sight here 



There are several cases of pneu- 
monia in this county 



An additional two inches 
snow fell Sunday night. 



of 



You have probably noticed that 
the days are getting longer. 



It looks like the Ohio river has 
•one out of business permanently. 

There has been an unusual num 
her of cases If 



winter. 



pneumonia 



this 



Rov. Edgar Riley began the new 
■year equipped with a brand new 
"Tin Lizzie." 



Born to Cleveland Snyder 
wife, of Cincinnati, on the 
Inst., a boy; ■ 



and 
12th 



The ifcllow who predicted a 
mild winter has left the country 
never to return. 



Bart Aylor, who lives out on the 
Woolper hills, is nursing a frozen 
noso 



Baa it not been cold enough ita 
kill fruit trees, to aay nothing 
about the fruit? 



Came Veiy Near Freezing 

Thoa Sommors, who resides with 
Hubert McMullen across Gunpow- 
der creek, got his feet, fingers 
and ears badly frozen as he 
came from Covington last Satur- 
day He was walking and was 
frozen before he realized his con- 
dition 

Has Rheumatism Badly 

William Seikman, who owns and 
occupies what is known aa the 
Edgar Cropper farm, has been 
confined to the house for some 
time with rheumatism Mr. Seik- 
man has been a very hard work- 
ing man all his life and being 
confined to the house is not at 
all to his liking under any cur- 
cumstancesi 



Dynamite Expert. 

Sterling Rouse, of the Limaburg 
neighborhood, was in Burlington 
on questionaire business, last Fri- 
day, and made the RECORDER a 
call. Mr. Rouse is an expert 
manipulator of dynamite, and if 
ho goes "over there" ho will, if 
he gets a chance, place a charge 
under the Kaiser and blow him 
to kin gdom - corn s, , 



Th;> 



Welcome War Flour. 

replacement of •'patent' 



and believing in its superiority! 
otherwise; This indicates that the 
consumer will not suffer by the 
repiaceimmi J*™?.? | change from "patent" flour - a 

flour by war flour made by mi I- % ,. ry 6 mo(lern p . F duet-to some-' 
the whole whea. rtould be * more like the flour which 
by housekeepers. It BU9ta \ nml the human race for un _ 
la a measure of con-, countad centurle s before the in- 1 

vention of patent flour. That mil- 
lers sell bran as health food, aft , 



ing 

u elcomed 
not only 

servation, but also a means of 
bringing to the domestic pantry 
flour in some respects certainly, 
and in all respects probably, su- 
perior to "patent" flour which 



tor taking it out Of flour to 
improve the flavor, and charge 
more for the bran than for the 



to 
modern mills have provided and, another argument in favor 

which modern demand has jmade j of ^ f , our 

War flour should be welcomed. 
The regulation of milling and the 
regulation of the price of wheat 



the popular and the acceptea 
Hour for making home made 
bread. 
In |all primitive grain making 



Wm Finn, of Plattsburg, froze 
his face last Saturday as he went 
home from Burlington, 



Not more than three or four 
ps^}e from the country were in 
Burangton last Saturday. 

January is half gone. Hope the 
remainder of the month will bring 
better weather conditions. 



Hogs' Backs Frozen 
Johnnie Bachelor reports attend 
ing hog killings after the very 
cold weather several weeks ago 
and says that the backs of some 
of the animals slaughtered show- 
ed plainly that they had been 
brozen, while other spots on the 
carcasses gave evidence of having 
been effected by the cold weath- 
er He said it was the first time he 
had ever noticed anything of the 
kind 



" ! which Thurston Ballard, of Louis- j 
the whole gram of wheat or corn ... m, f ATn p, r ie nc e tru- ' 

was used. If there are advocates £"*, a JjJ^^ ^ff rom 3a 
of the more refined flour ana | £_«»>» f™ ^"/hoSd be; 

a blessed protec- 
tion from the profiteering of the i 
highly organized milling indus- 
try of America at a period when J 
the once universal local grist mill . 
has so nearly gone out of exist- 1 
fnee that a neighborhood sup- 
ply at reasonable prices could not 
have been expected. 
Flour making formerly was 



meal there are also adherents of , in ,^_„ 

the flour and meal made by old-! appreciated as 

fashioned methods more nearly 

like those of primitive times 

than the methods of the modern 

mills. 

Flour milling as a large commer 
cial enterprise is a new industry 
comparatively. It was inaugurated 
about the time of the American 



^^a£U\X about^the honieho d task* it next'became a , 
f-Zl S P tbP PlvH W«^ The local industry. Now it is agreat 
^*nMnJS%S^LtnS^ rtorSSZ international industry. Be< 
^ _, * B H™^^^!^ £C? there Tare no local mills the 



Gives It Up 

"The oldeBt inhabitant" is now 
ready to confess that he never 



The snow shovel chorus 
heard for some time on 
streets in Burlington at an 
hour last Monday morning. 



wis 

tha 

early 



time 



Doctors have had a hard 

TliJ& month making their' calls. r» p/*. 1 /" ' 
some instances it was impossible jfj^nJ* 3 
to respond when summoned 



If an abundance of snow makes 
3 good year for wheat this part 
of the country ought to have 
a tremendous yield next summer, 

Deputy Sheriff Hume had the 
"never fail" starter attached to 
his auto last Saturday. It can be 
relied on under any and allwoath 
ar conditions. 



experienced a winter like this in 
the matter of severe weather. A 
few more weeks Uke the past two 
months and the farmers will bo 
confronted with a scarcity or food 
for their livestock, which will 
simply be distressing owing 
the very high prices they will 
have to pay for supplies they will 
be required to buy. 



ing upon water ^ower and grind- 
ing its "grist" with crude machin- 
ery, is as old as the settlement of 
the United States. The type of 
mill which once was a universal 
local utility now is in many 
parts of the United States a rare 
and picturesque survival", but those 
who patronize such mills, especn 
ially for the procurement of corn- 
meal made of the whole grain 
and not ground as fine as it is 
in commercial milling, find the old 
time processes satisfactory. 

The horsepower mills and wind- 
mills which antedated watermills, 
but eventually gave way to water 
power where such power was avail 
able, were the first examples of 



Fine Beans 



Mr Thole, who owns the Henry 



farm down on 
creek, has put on the market 
through W L. Kirkpa trick, groc 



mechanical preparation of grain 
for breadmaking in America. In 
the early Seventeenth century 
New England watermills began a 
small export business in flour, 
soon followed in this enterprise 
to ! by the windmills, watermills and 
horsemills of New York and Vir- 
ginia, but until ,the middle of the 
Eighteenth century the bulk of 
the flour and meal made in the 
United States was made by small 
mills for local consumption, and 
often or usually made for rural 



Middle Tmstoniers, for a perceatage of 



Because 

con- 
sumer is at the mercy of the 
great milling interest which could 
if there were no regulation of 
prices, buv -wheat at its own 
price, because the farmers are 
not organized, and sell flour at 
its own price because the con sum 
er would be defenseless. 



The B. B. Hume Automobile Co., Agents 

23-25-27 E. Fifth St, Covington, Ky. 
Agent* for the following Automobiles* and Truck- 
CHEVROLET, one man top, tire rack, demountable rim, 
a swell car. No hill it will not climb, have sold 102 and 
have contracted for 125 more. There is not a dissatisfied 
customer. 

Chevrolet Baby Grand $ 962. f. o. b. Factory. 

Chevrolet Model 49 $ 6 71 f. o. b. Factory. 

HUMPMOBILE 1918 MODLE, 
Price $1425, F. 0. B. Factory. 

PREMIER, with electric starter, $2250 f. o. b. Detroit 

REPUBLIC TRUCKS 

Modle 9, 3-4 Ton, $ 920. Modle 10, I Ton, #1230 Modle, lj| 11518 
2 Ton Truck, $1940, 3J Ton Truck, $2830 f. o. b. 

FREE SERVICE— Hupmoblle and Truck Is each entitled to 50 hrs. 
ffree service, and the Chevrolet, 40 hours. 

All kind* of Auto Repair* done by the moit competent man fat Covington. 
A full and complete stock of Auto Accessories. 



I REMOVAL- 




wm 



the grain brought to the mill to 
bo ground. There were in 1840 fri- 
er, a "bean that is a stranger toj ; 200 mills in Kentucky, Indiana, fl- 
ail who have seen it, and the j linois, Ohio and Michigan, very 
seed men in the city say they do fow of which made flour for city 
not know any name for it It is | markets or distant markets. 



a large bean and makes a splen- 
did dish when cooked Mr. Thole 
would have had a fine cropr of 
them last year had the ground 
hogs not raided his field 



Last Friday's Cincinnati .daily 
papers were received at the Bur- 
lington postoffice Monday morn- 
the intervening publications 
aining out. 




he weather last Saturday put 



♦K« FWri'« m,r nt busing "In this' Js P ut on * he floors - So far much 
the Ford » out of busines > r- f thft tobacco of , ered on these 



part of the country, it being the 
first day since their introduction 
here tha't they were not on their 
job. 



William Finn, of Plattsburg, who 
i9 a student at the local Hi 
school, has joined Messrs. Howara 
and Owen Acra in light housekeep 
ing. They occupy a flat in the 
postoffice building. 

The drivers of the local trucks 
concluded the weather could not 
interfere with their daily trips to 
the city, but last Friday and Sat- 
urday they reversed their opinion 
in regard to that matter. 

Charles Youell put his portable 
saw mill in operation last week 
sawing wood for fuel. He replen- 
ished his supply at a rapid rate, 
and the pile was begrudged him 
by many who saw it. 



Was the Worst Eever 

The weather this winter has 
been (a very great disadvantage 
to (jLhe loose leaf tobacco mar- 
kets which are confidently expect 
ed to be much better with the 
improvement of the weather and 
the condition of the tobacco that 



markets has been in very bad coc< 
dition and the buyers will not 
take it as it will require too 
much labor and risk to handle it. 



majority of them were crude coun 
try mills to which farmers 
brought "turns" of corn or wheat 
in sacks laid across a mule's back, 
returning with flour or meal with- 
out any cash changing hands in 
the transaction. 

The expression "Waterground' 
is employed by a majority of per 
sons to denote the meal and flour 
made by old-time processes. The 
determining factor in the charac- 
ter of the product of mills is not) 
the nature of the power which 
operates the machinery, but the 
nature of the machinery which 
the power operates. The water 
power of the Mississippi is em- 
ployed today by the great mills 
of Minneapolis, the largest milling 
center in America, making 16,000,- 
000 barrels of flour 'annually and 
exporting to all civilized coun- 
tries of the two hemispheres. 

Between 1870 and 1900 more 
changes and improvements in mill 
ing machinery were made than 



Personal Mention 

Mrs. M. L, Riddell had tonsititis 
several days the past week. 

Miss Graham Roberts, of Wal- 
ton, was the guest of Misses Liz- 
zie and Sallie Rogers the past 
week. 

Miss Kathryn Sullivan, of Com- 
missary neighborhood, is boara- 
ing at EL E. Kelly's and attentt- 
ing High School, 

Mrs. Alice Snyder is visiting her 
son, Cleveland and wife, of Cin- 
cinnati, and enjoying the company 
of her new grandson. 

The weather the past few weeks 
has made R. S. Cowen think often 
of the warm, sunny ciime of far 
off St. Petersburg, Florida. 

Miss Jonette Revill returned a 
few (days since from a visit 67 
two weeks with her sister, Mrs. 
J. G. Furnish, of Covington, 

The little child of Lloyd Weav- 
er and wife, over on Gunpowder 
creek, was very sick several days 
last week. One day and night Dr 
Yelton never left its bedside. 



X 



Atlas Auto Top Company 

How at 15 East Seventh St., C0VIHGT0N, KX 

Tops, Seat Covers, Curtains, Ford Seats $4.75 up. 

Write. Phone or Call Phone S. 3837. 




,¥^^^^^^¥^^^l^^^^^¥^^)^^^# 



No Advanoe. 



His Mother Burned to Death 

Jacob Ferris, who lives on the 
Bethel farm 'a mile north of Bur- 
lington, was notified last Sun- 
day morning that his mother had '. h' a *d been made in th? two coun 
died from the effects of a burn tr i os preceding this brief era 
she received the day beforo at the mechanical development 
her home in or near Dry Ridge, ! milling for commercial purposes. 
Grant county Mrs. Ferris waSi«f neM improvements effected a 

about 73 years old Mr. Ferris ra cHcal change in- flour. They, . n« soirits and looks 

left immediately for Dry Kidge I m ade it possible to . separate °™ was ^ in h ^ iru ^ an ^* 

The telephone message gave no | more completely the various e\H with £^ Hig oW Men( f g her * 

of wheat. Ariei ,. 



Misses Kathryn Brown and 
Margaret Hughes came hom9 from 
the city last Friday afternoon t-3 
spend Saturday and Sunday. 

On account of the cold weather 
Misses 'Ruth and Elizabeth Kelly 
and their brother, Galen, and Kirt 
ley Cropper and sister, Miss Mary 
Bessie, did not go home to spend 
last Saturday and Sunday with 
their parents. 

R J. Akin, who lives over -on 
Doublelick creek, was a caller at 
this office last Monday. Mr. Akin 
says he has been in this country 
a long time but never before did 
he encounter such weather as that 
of last Saturday. 

R K. Aylor and Kirb Clone, of 
the Waterloo neighborhood, were 
among the business .visitors to 
Burlington last Monday. They en- 
countered several deep snow 
drifts The trip was very labor- 
of | ious 

Col, John White, of Walton, 
brought a drummer over from his 
town one day last week. Thecol- 



We have purchased a dealers entire stock of Hardware, 
Leather, Etc., which enables us to take care of your 
wants in repairing of harness at old prices. We also 
have a 60 per cent Neatsfoot Jet Black #4 Aft 

Harness Uil, at per gallon .^ | i||U 

New and Second Harness at AH Prices. 
It will pay you to visit us and get our prices. 

Thomann Harness Store 

S. 3018 112 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 



particulars as to how the old j men ts in the grain 



lady happened to get burned 



bran and gluten were more thor- 
oughly removed, and the flour 
as a result was whiter and in 
millers' parlance, less "tough." 



« 



Since falling over all the furni- 
ture in his room one night not 
long (since O. P. Tanner cannot 
understand why any person will 
do without a flash light to use 
at night about the house especial- 
ly. m 

. Claud Stephenson, of Pt. Pleas- 
ant neighborhood, was in Burling- 
ton, last Friday, preparing his 
questionaiiv. He has moved to 
Hebron, where he and his brother 
Leslie, will conduct a general 
store. 

David F, Houston, Bwetary ol 

Agriculture, ban asked Congress 
lor an appropriatioTT^T : i&6,00n,t)W) 
to enable the Department of Ag- j 
riculture to buy and sell seed to ' 
farmers fo.' cost at a reasonable 
p'ico _ 

B. B. Hums and wife are board- 
ing at the Boorie House in Bur- 
lington, which will be their home 
until he can rent or buy on*> in 
(his county that suits him. Mr. 
Hume is deputy under Sheriff L. 
A. Conner. 

The services of the local attor- 
neys were never so much in de- 
mand as they have been for tfte 
last two w-.^eks, and they have 
frocly and willingly rendered 
them unto those who received 
qw* tion aires front the local draft 
liourd. ^^^ 

Two of Hro radiators in the 
High School building wort- frozen 
la^t Saturday night and won' 
blunted, but the damage win* not 
mj great that local mechanics 
could not repair them and have 
them ready f<»r MO by Monday 
i ulnar 

' '!»•» legislature i* uow In ruit- 
nnd tlie •crspptrtg wilt 
i>okI». The i.m|>.M..n< - question l» 
11... flrn' to lx>l> up and laus 
fnlr t<» ki«#p th* law-rmkliiK body 
in a bud humor tb» entire Netwdon 

it hn» done i>>u» oo- 

>na, 



A Recently Married Editor 

If the first three days of Jan- j W a'g, "in other words, more starchy 
uary govern the first three months ' ke Cau3e it lacked the bran— Which 
of the year, as it is claimed, we ' ()W i s so pj by millers 



in small 
will have some January, February ! packages at high prices as a 
and March weather, But what i noa ith food— and the gluten which 
make the difference. We have ■ i8 a great part of the food value 
had so many troubles recently f wheat. The "middlings" rich m 
that we have become accustomed ' g m ten, and the bran, which might 
to them and feel as though wo (>a called as the French call 
were ready for 'any emergency | spinach, "the broom of the stom 
which comes up, When you are | ac h," became stock feed. 



out of coal, meat, flour, lard shoes 
and everything else, especially 
money, water pipes bursting, gaso 



By the invention of a "mid- 
dlings purifiei-" the millers put 
hack into flour, without injury 



line tanks frozen, and when you i („ it 8 appearance, about the time 
can't do anything but dream, yo'i , f t U;> Civil War, part of the "mid 
rre in the middle of an awful riHn yg" they had gotten rid of, 
fix and can't get either way,— j triumphantly, at an earlier period. 
Falmouth Outlook They began to charge more for 

the flour because thev had put 



gave him quite an ovation. 

Judge Gaines is congratulating 
himself because of not having to 
be away from home holding court 
while the weather was so in- 
tensely cold. He is very much of 
a home man and especially undejj 
weather conditions such as this 
month has furnished. 



a 

a 
a 
m 
s 

a 

a 
s 



Tne 
Woman's Favorite 

Women bear tbeir full Bhare of 
the dairy work. Anything that 
will raaUa tbeir tasks easier de- 
scrvo3 a cordial welcome. A 
woman can turn 

THE NSW 

SHARPLES 

SUCTtON-PCCO 
Separator slow- 




ly and yet get 
aJ tha eretun. 
Any other 
separator 
will lose cream 
when turned 
bcltjw speed. ' 
You have 
orrl/ to dlt a 
pail of milk 
ir.to the largo, low supply tank. 
The simrle tubular howl is very 
easy t" c'onn — only three p»rt». no 
fu*»y tii>-s to wiih. Come in mid let 

u« wituw yoit 4iow It work*. 

QUIGLEY ft BEEMON, 
Limaburg, Ky. 



D. E. Cdstleman, 
ATTORNEY AT LAW, 

—Office over— 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucky. 



IP YOU WANT A 

CREAM SEPARATOR 

GIVE ME A CAUk 

»■• 

I handle the United States, a 
first-class Separator. OldjSepa- 
tors taken in trade. 



s s pi a 



John Conrad had a force of 
hands cleaning the snow drifts 
out of the Burlington and Flor- 
ence pike, last Monday, but it 
was no use, the snow that fell 
that night made new drifts which 
he tackled again the next day 
The mail was unable to come from 
Covington to Burlington. Tuesday 
People served at the Burlington 
postoffice have made no kick 
because of the uncertainty of the 
mail service as they know Mr 
Conrad will have the mail here if 



JOHNS NORTHCUTT 

ATTOrttlEY AT LAW 

402 Coppin Bldg. Covington, Ky. 

Residence— 1017 Madison Av< . 
Office 8. 1719 -Phones— Residence S. lSltS. 



Thos. Rice. 

Burlington, - 

sept 28- tf 



^ 




eo there will be no delay gettin 



I th^'w^'makh^n ^i prom I quails «re about" annil 
it on hand as soon as he receives | of ' i^t^con *2 and $1 a barrel j th ^ a P art of _the st ate 

be the W ith the middlings in. and, 



his stock A delay mi^ht 



with 



cause of your failure to secure , tn;> fi our a9 w hUe as it had been 



the fertilizer and put you to con- 
siderable trouble at a time when 
you want to be using it It is a 
bad policy in any kind of busi- 
ness to put off doing anything 
until the last moment, and espec- 
ially does this hold good a* lo 
farm work As the weather hesnot 
permitted the tarmexa t<> do any 



For Sale. 



when thev raised the price, be?.] 
came they got the middlings • 
out. Cue acre land with frame house 

The modern "patent" flour is | am j two outbuildings, ) miles froiii 
made largely oi' the "middlings,-* ■ pik e; the property known as the Oa- 
tho part of the wheat berry Jje- son nchool house situated on the nub- 
twesn the bran and th-> starchy | [ H . roa j i t . H ding from *he Burlington 
mitral portion. It is rich in u i £ Bells view pike beginning new 
Ihigh quality of gluten, but has , MrHi Kli/H WalfconViu KasJ. Bond 



work this winter they will hiyo b^g condensed by some dletians rott< j, Hon*.' cost Slfii) when m-iterlal 



in UtiN'.l* when the w eath e r will 
permit them to k" afield, and 
th>v should attend to eveivtlwi ; 
po'siMr* while they are laying 
oif on account of tb> weather 



Curd of Thanks. We d< 
thank all ot our mails rri-ielsatni in all roH)M'<dH better fOO< 

Kino 



an ovtM-rimil pfOfTuct rotkbrn j nn( j |,ibor were about half cost, of 
Of valuabl y elements of ' he u hul • ; p r ,. M . nt ti , m .. Alt bld^ mnsl !>.• sent 
wheat in the effort to, make it ' H iid«-r neal to J. C. tJordua. SupsriUr 
"fancy'' I" appenranco. Its advo- 1 t.ndent Schools. Bight to reject 
cat-s argue that it in no! infer- Hnv rtll ,j H u | MI | S r , nerved. Thin 
lor to whole wheat flour in, point I property in suitable fur home for 
of digestibility, but whether 5 il i"»i Hinall fit 



RILEY &. RILEY 

A1TORNEYS-AT UW, 
and REAL ESTATE., 

Burlington, Ky. 

Edgar C Biley will be in Burling- 

tun every Monday and Friday. 

.a ■— — — — — -■ ' " 

DR. T. E. RANDALL 

of Petersbury, 

VETENARIAN 

is now ready to answer calls day 
or night. "Charges reasonable. 

FOR SALE 

All kinds of farms in Kentucky, 
Ohio and Indiana. I have all the 
bargains. See me at the Erlanger 
Deposit Bank. Wm. E. BAIRD, 
sep 13 Erlanger, Ky. 



GEO. B- POWERS 

Real Estate Agent, 

Fire and Life Insurance 

WALTON, KY. 

Hcnil for my list of proixrt.v for rutle. (ilvo 

»»• jour property If > ou want to »«-ll. 

Coimulbdlun Low. 



School Attention. 



neighbors who have been so 
;tll'l J"\,i1 to ui, in QUI 

men! We ulso deaire to 

Hi, ink th • I Ud So. lei J "I 

church for Ihi It 

illful floral tribute |. ild t.. 
lined one. Wo trill fclWi 

iwmli'i one and all (OT t!>*i' 
lllg klntlheltM. 

The family of C. K Wood 



mtm 



yi 



than 
whole ub'.-.it flour l« ; > muchmoot 
id <,i...tu,n. Dr Harvi \ W. Wil- 

uu it is» not, and be i* | 
i t 

imrnonb chantr more 

Si/hula uloat 
flour, »nd ' piiie retdiU 

iv tlu-i •* !•» il <ll ••! mi' 
tti«r trad" u liteh .1 WhoU 

nii.it bread, piefwlnf Ita (Uvor 



■MHMM 



._iuily "i t< inn'.' iiioiM), 
'Ifrins 1.8 en-.li, 1-8 *»x months, 
! a in twelve months, d*>fvrrvd i 
hi, Mis i,. i •■in I. till rati) of lnt.iruiit. 
With h'in r. tain. U tu UMUlttl defttred 
jui\ in. nir 
|)..n. I,, ordi i H»n luoallou 

ih. IU1M, 
J C (iiiKDo.N. clntlrtiian. 
tli l.l.Y H*< " -ui >. 

iuk« th. KKrOKUKH 



An ««xaralnatton for t'oini'.ion 
School DIplontHH will bo held in Hiir- 
llngton, Ky-, «t the Court Kouse. 
January 95th and IWth. All pupils 
and pairoiiH who are lnt.re4t.il wlU 
giv« Inuiil to thin Miinouno/uunt mid 
govern then; kconrditiiirly. The 

examination will «tart rh«* first day 
J U t»0HI>' 

Uupurlut«*ud«itt. 

in h«a beli weU pro- 
t«ct«4 hy anow thto^intar, 



Reasons! 

Why you should nsfl 
CarduL the woman* 
tonic, for your trouble*, 
have been shown in 
thousands of letters from 
actual users of this medi- 
cine, .who speak from 
S:rsonal experience. If 
e results obtained by 
other women for so many 
years have been so* uni- 
formly good, why not 
give Cardui a trial? 

Take 

CARD 

The Woman's 

» Mrs. Mary J. Inrin, 
Cullen, Va., write 
"About It years ago, 
suffered untold misery 
with femate trouble, beari 
Ing-do'vn pains, head* 
dche, numbness . . Jf 
would go for three ween 

' almost bent double . . . 

My husband want to Dr. 

■ -lor Cardui . . . 

AJtef taking about two 

pottles I began going 
•round and when I took 
thrae bottles I could do 
all my wotk." kVlfe 



a 




■■ 



■Hi 



■M 



— 



Taaa Your O.univ fapri, 



^ mmmma ^ ammm 



iT (INCLE SAM 
PlYS SOLDIERS 

Subject That Most People Know 
Very Little About 



FOR UNIVERSAL DRILL 

National Army at Camp Grant 
Favors Measure. 



BOOWB COUNTY RECORDER 



Vote 



WHOLE SYSTEM IS CHANGED 



4.S01 to 136 for the Military 
Training of Ait Boys of 
Nineteen. 



avER wakes daring HOW TO BUY POULTRY 

ESCAPE FROM GERMANY 




***++****■** k k kk k k *** ** **** 



(Private GeU $33 a Month as Long as 
He Ift in the United States erd 20 
Ptr Cent Additional When He Goes 

j Abroad— Allowance Made for Wife 
and Children — Dependent Parents 
Provided For. 

Washington— Ask the first ton peo- 
ple you meet what Uncle Sam pays hte 
soldiers. It -tvill ho safe to bet they 
■won't know. 

. ITflir of them may hnve some hazy 
S(io;, about a "dollar » day," and you 
Jwill tind lots of people who think 
K7acle Sam still pays the old scale of 
£13 a month, but few outside the amy 
i hno w- the ins and o uts of t h e wane 



f ! 



I ^^iihP frw--ttre ttts-nrrr} trots 
.^ w bcale, even for private soldiers. 

The whole pay system of the United 
(States army has been revolutionized 
isince the war started. 

A private in Uncle Sam's armies, 
jregnlnr, National Guard or National 

{irtny, receives in cash, as long as he 
s In the United States, $33 a month, 
In addition to food, clothing and med- 
ical attendance. 

When he is Bent to Europe he gets 
20 per cent extra, whether in training 
or in the trenches', which brings the 
minimum cash par up to $39.00 a 
[month, or $1.30 a day. 

The revolutionary part of tin? pay 
-System, however, about which most 
[people are Ignorant, Is the scale of -nl- 
powances made by the government to 
the soldiers' dependents. We nre thus 
Ibrcaklng away fn.m the old theory of 
■^•paying soldiers n tint wage for fighting 
J jto the new theory that the nation is re- 
wraa* (sponsible for the welfare not only of 
!the man in service, hut for the depend- 
ents whom he left behind him. 

Under this new scheme, if "there's a 
twee-wine waiting" she receives each 



Rockford, 111.— The Eighty-sixth di- 
vision of the National army emphat- 
ically advocates universal military 
training for young men. By the "di- 
vision" Is mount not its officers but 
its enlisted men— its .privates, ser- 
geants, and corporals — men taken from 
civil life in the last three months un- 
der the selective service act. 

The first sergeants of S3 companies 
and batteries have polled their men 
on the vacation and have reported the 
results. 
The question asked was : 
"I'o you think alt young men should 
have nt least six months' military 
training when they reach nineteen 
years of age?" 

The return cards show these totals: 

Number of men favorable, 4,601. 

Number of ruea opposed. 130. 
— One nidc of the car d was le f t blank 
for "further information or remarks." 
What was written there showed the 
reasons for the vote. The emphasis 
was about equally divided between the 
benefits to the men receiving the train- 
ing and the protection of the nation. 
The geographical source of the unit — 
whether It came from the congested 
areas of Chicago or the open hills of 
Wisconsin — seemed to make no dif- 
ference. 

The question was put before the 
men on its own merits and without 
argument. 




Government Warns Against Ice- 
Packed Chickens. 



HUMAN DOLL COSTUME 






(month direct from Uncle Sam $15 a 
(month, which is virtually an addition 
(to the fighting man's wage, and brings 
(his total compensation up to $48 a 
(month while he is in the United States 
tend to $54.60 abroad. 

If there is one child with the wife, 
[the allowance Is $25 a month; two 
ichlldreu, $32.50^ and so on up to the 
(point where, with a wife and six chil- 
dren. Uncle Sam pays $50 a month in 
cash to the family. 

Allowance for Parents Made. 
It may not be enough to support 
even with what the enlisted man 
ro.eend home out of his wages, but 
it is at least a recognition of Uncle 
[jSam's responsibility and a bulwark 
(against dependence on charity. 
f Allowances are also provided for de- 
pendent parents, $10 a month for each, 
{and for brothers, sisters and grandchil- 
dren, $5 a month for each, with the 
(provlse that hi any case the govern- 
|ment %ni not pay to the dependents 
fof any tnan more than $50 a month. 

No mawkish prudery entered into 
'the drafting of these provisions; by 
^acknowledging Jj Is Illegitimate child a 
isoldier may secure for it the full gov- 
ernments^ allowance, the only provi- 
sion beilj| that if it is born after De- 
•cetnber 



;Un!ted 
there" 
(then, . 
hgether 




1917, it must be born in the 
ites. So In the case of a wife 
be no legal marriage If 
* that they have lived to- 
man and wife for two years 
jprior to^nlistment. 

Uncle ^Sam also sees to it that his 
I soldi erajpo not throw all the burden 
!of earhjjPfor dependents dn Iris broad 
ishouldgrs_by making it coinpulsorjLfor 
leach man who has left a wife or child 
jb*hindjjsw)ay over to them through 
[the tr^Bry .at least $15 a mouth and 
j*s mu<Jrmore as will equal the allow- 
ance- jvhlch Uncle Sam makes up to 
* man's pay. Thus for the man 
Ce abroad who has left a 
behind the man will 
:o them at least $10.80- 
eh the government will 
aklng a total of $44.80 
e to receive. 

on system Is wiped out 
'id far jnore equitable sys- 
tem of compensation for death and 
^disability. 

This compensation differs from that 
provided in «ny other law. It takes 
the family as the, unit that is serving 
ithe nation, not the individual man. 
Depends on Size of Family. 
It bases/ the ': compensation' on the 




Lieut, ratrlek O'Brien, an American 
member of the British flying corps, 
who was brought down in a one-sided 
battle by the Germans, and who had 
been taken Into Germany on his way to 
a prison camp, Jumped from a train 
which was going SO miles an hour, and 
by many heroic and clever moves man- 
agedto get Into Holland, and then back 
to England. 

O'Brien was reported missing last 
August 17, and his reappearance was 
a great surprise to his friends. On 
the morning of August 17 enemy gun- 
ners forced him to land, but fortunate- 
ly he got back to his own lines. Later 
in the day fie" was again flying over the 
enemy lines and he, with five other 
machines, wa« engaged by 20 German 
airplanes. O'Brien alone engaged four 
of them. Ue accounted for one of the 
machines before he was shot In the lip. 
He fell with his damaged plane 8,000 
feet He cannot explain why he was 
not killed. 
When he regained conscio usn ess 



Worth 10 to 13 Per Cent Per Pound 

Less Than Those Properly 

Handlad. 

Washington. — Paylug the same 
price for wet-packed chickens as for 
dry-packed involves heavy money loss 
to the consumer, according to the 
dressed poultry specialists of the Unit- 
ed States department of agriculture. 
Goveraajeni experiments have shown 
that wet-packing a broiler and sending 
it to market on ice causes it to lose 13 
per cent of its value and fowls lose 
about 10 per cent. If dry-packed broil- 
ers are worth 40 cents, wet-packed nre 
not worth more than 86 cents; if dry- 
packed fowls cost 30 cents, wet-paeked 
one should not cost over 27 cents. 

A chicken thrown into Ice water to 
remove anliaal heat and sent to market 
Jn a barrel in direct contact with 
cracked ice, if Is pointed out, absorbs 
water for which the consumer has to 
pay chicken prices." The water also 
dissolves out from the -chicken valua- 
ble flavoring and nutritive substances. 
These go into the water nt the bottom 
of the barrel along with filth that is 
washed from dirty feet and bloody 
heads, and trickles downward over the 
poultry. v 

With a dry-packed chicken the ani- 
mal beat is removed by hanging the 
bird In an artificially cooled room 
maintained at nearly freezing tempera- 
ture. The chicken is then packed into 
a box containing 12 birds and sent to 
market. The box Is hauled In refriger- 
ator cars and is kept by good retailers 
In good tea boxes until sold. The bird 
is never wet, has no chance to absorb 
water or becomes washed out. A bird 
should never be wet until It gets a 
final quick rinsing off in the house- 
wife's kitchen. The practice of some 
housewives of soaking a chicken after 
it is dressed, in a pan of water, even 
for nn hour or two, helps to leach out 
valuable qualities. 



Dibowski's Cafe 



-ThAT 



Neat Little Place 

For Farmer, Workman, Merchant, 0erk 

and Professional Man. 
Commercial Luncheon from 11 a m. to 1:30 p. 

§ps*- m. Supper 5 to 7 p. m. 

No. 6 Pikt Street, - - Covington.Kentuo ky. 





;better sight 

^ Makes the world brighter. Many peo- 
ple g-o through life with poor vision, 
with only a few dollars would make 
them see perfectly. Don't do it— it 
pays to take care of your eyes. 
Phone South 1746 

JJxi. N. F. PENN,6i 3 Madison H Av°e TC ^^^ 




PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

Undertaker & Embalmer 

Magnificent Horse Drawn Luxurant Ambulance 
or at 

Automobile Equipment Your Command 

Calls Answered Promptly in Auto at all Hours. 

Phones \»f { g£ T * RLANGKR m 

ERL^NGER, KY. 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

WALTON- KY. 



O Bnen was In a German war hospital. 
Later, when he was being taken into 
Germany, he jumped from the moving 
train, and by walking at night, swim- 
ming rivers and subsisting only on 
food that he conld get from the fields, 
he managed to reach Holland. 

He was a fngitive for 72 days. He 
had a narrow escape when he was in 
sifiht of his goal. To circumvent 
charged wires O'Brien built a bridge 
with nearby wood and threw it across 
the wires. It broke under his weight, 
and O'Brien says that he can still feel 
the shock. He dug a tunnel with his 
hands under the wires and he was 
free. 

A brief telegram was received by 
his mother, Mrs. Margaret O'Brien, 
saying that he had escaped from the 
Germans, and that he sooa would be 
home. O'Brien will try to change to 
the American aviation -.corps. The 
photo shows him standing In front of 
his machine. 






AUTO AFTER JACK RABBIT 

Wheel Came Off, There Was a Wreck 
and No Joke. 




This great big human doll Is most 
successful as an agency of gathering 
funds for relief organizations. The 
costume Is most unique and attractive 
and will prove to be of the same good 
purpose everywhere, if y o u n g l a dl es ia 
the many pities will take to wearing it 
,at the inairy bazaars throughout the 
United States bu raise «amds for the 
soldiers and for many other worthy 
purposes. 

The costume is made on full lines 
:and is something on the style of a rid- 
ing habit, except . for the curiously 
shaped hat, <—— 



yalse of the famIM|Lfrom time to time. 
Plrile a totally dfHabled bachelor will 



get only 
[wife at 
QPwenty 
required ; 
may live, 
not 

If he 
[received-! 
Iren 






a month, the man with a 

^children wlU get $75. 

{Is added if a nurse Is 

month as long as he 

her be is married or 

from injuries or disease 
de line of duty, the widow,, 
wldewed mother recefre 
: from $20 to $75 a month, 
ike of family. No dls- 
I between a private and 
' 
, J&ery man mar* lake 
up to $10,0110 at the W 
'fcornlahlriK M .<h Insurance 
times— -the entire nation 
■ft treasury beam the war 
M insurance Is wit.«ly safe 
yroteet it from creditors. 
r lawyer* ami loan sharks. 



GUS, JUST GUS, NOT GUSSIE 

New Jersey Bought Comfort Kits and 
Soldier Writes to "Miss Hart- * 
man." 



l-itinction 
it$8 highec 
Jn adf 

<fflP D8ul 

BBBsHtCSt 

iln*. pi ,-!<■. 



e'FlOWta ttuuifit 




New York.— This thing of adopting 
one of the boys in the trenches may 
be all right for the women, but Gus 
Hartman, a janitor in the Essex coun- 
ty courthouse at Newark, N. J., is at a 
loss to know just why or how he 
should go about It. Some time ago he 
contributed to a fund to buy comfort 
kits for the soldiers, and his name as 
"Gus" Hartman was placed on a card 
in one of the kits. Soon he received 
the following letter: 
"My Dear Miss pitman : 

"It is very strange that not until 
,now did I discover your name con- 
cealed Jn a comfort kit given to me 
■ by my district board. Nevertheless I 
| took advantage of the 'find' and this 
letter la the result. •* 

"Tell me something about yourself. 
I am sure I would like to meet yon 
When I am in Newark some time, or 
perhaps when yon make a visit to 
Cump Dii. 

•if you have one, Inclose a picture of 
yourself. 

"Write ft Di Q. Sincerely. W, F\. 
Company IX gista Infantry, Camp 
l>lx. N. J. 

"i' thk vuo pancn: m waff 

only Iwady Witts* tmptomvnt" 



"A curiosity to time a Jack rabbit 
with a tested speedometer resulted in 
the wrecking of an automobile near 
Topeka, Kan., one night recently. 

W. F. Haafe, on automobile agent nt 
Natoma. was on his way to Kansas 
City, and as the road was good, was 
keeping up about nil the law permits In 
the way of speed, when a jack rabbit 
chose the same route. Hnafe thought 
it would-be a joke to make the rabbit 
take a strttng. nndTan hropeedomcter 
up to within 80 per cent of its adver- 
tised ability. But having chosen east 
as his general direction and that par- 
ticular road as his route, the rabbit 
continued to plod along at a little bet- 
ter than 50 miles an hour. 

The rabbit did not turn out, but a 
portion of t he pursuing en r did. After 
he had crawled out of a ditch and 
twisted himself Into shape. Haafo 
caught a car into Topeka, where ho 
waited until daylight to hunt a wheel, 
which had left the general wreckage 
and taken refuse in a corn field. 

.__FI3H SWALLOWED RING— 



i 



CONQUEST ATWrTOJLTUrT 

The German empire has be- 
come a world empire. Every- 
where in distant quarters of 
the earth thousands of our 
countrymen are living. German 
guardians of the sea, German 
science, German industry, are 
going across the sea. The value 
of what Germany has upon the 
sea amounts to thousands of 
millions. It Is yonr earnest 
duty, gentlemen, to help bind 
this greater German empire 
firmly to our ancestral home. 
■ .. It is ray wish that, 
standing In closest union, you 
help me to do my dnty not only 
to my countrymen In a narrow- 
er sense, but also to the many 
thousands of countrymen in for- 
eign lands. This means that I 
may be able to protect them If I 
must.— Kaiser's speech, June 10, 
1896. 




Higher Prices at Fur Sales. 



London.— Fur is in keen demand 
Just at present and a marked increase 
in price resulted at the October sales. 
Chinese, Australian and Itusslan sup- 
plies wor e very scarce, while ^Ameri- 
can furs were not half sufficient to 
meet the demand. Prices ranged from 
15 per cent to 100 per cent advance 
on previous sales. 



Undertaker - Embalmer 



Ifirot ©laaa equipment^ 

Calls Answered Promptly In Automobile Dav or Nlgltt. 

Holds License in Three States— Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky. 

Huto Hcaree and Outfit furnished if Slanted. ._ 

Telephone INo. 3», Walton, Ky. 



J. L. HAMILTON 

UNDERTAKER 

Verona. Kentucky. 

All of the Up-to-Date ^methods and 
reesonable charges. Fine line 
of Monument Work. 
Telephone— Calls answered prompt- 
ly, day or night. 



Old People Elope. 
aiinneapoHs, Minn.— To escape what 
they characterized as "the small town 
gossip," Charles F. Mayo, seventy 
years old, and Mrs. Louise Young, 
fifty-eight years old, eloped from NeT 
vada, la., and were married here. 



P 






NOT AN ELECTION BET 



It Had a Diamond in It and Had Been 
Lost. 

That truth is stranger than fiction i 
was demonstrated at lloopeston, III., i 
the other day when Uav Tllt.in a 
young farmer, received a letter from 
Peoria saying a diamond ring, valued 
nt $250, had been found In the stom- 
ach of n fish which had been caught 
in the flllnols river. 

In July Tilton was at Peoria, and 
while rowing on the river the ring 
dropped off his finger. He never ex- 
pected to see it again, and was much 
surprised to receive the letter. 

The writer said he caught the fish 
and, while dressing it, saw something 
bright fall out of the stomnch. n« 
also said he would he ghjd to send tho 
ring to Hoopeslou If Tilton would send 
the reward offered In a Peoria news- 
paper. The owner sent a check for 
$50 to the Peoria man. 



Throat Operation to Unfit Men for War 
Authoritlea in Scuttle believe they 
have unearthed a plot of German, ori- 
gin tn the arrest of Doctor Gordon and 
ft Rtttffian woman. Tim piiir am 

charged with i 

threat opersdou* to tank,- iaea unfit 

for service under tho oofurrtpiioa law. 




tone South 871. 

J. W. RUSSELL BRADFORD 
Attornby-aT-Law, 

I Coppln Bldg. Covington, Ky. 

II practice in all the courts. 
Witli O. M. Rogers 



C O A L 

The Famous 
Raymond City Coal 

Once Tried AJwas Used, 

Is Kept on hand constan- 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

K^D^NTIST^^ 

Will be at Burlington every Moncfay 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



Seamen J. C. Blehl and J. p. Yoh 
mttu of Newark are scarcely twenfy; 
two years old. yet they have taken up- 
on their shoulders a weighty vow and 
that Is not to, shave until iiuv have 
fought a good tight with uu enemv sub- 
Marine. 

The BSD have crossed the Atlantic 
several times, but it baa never beep 
Ihelr luck lp run Into one of tho 
enemy's subs. 

All they iiifd to i, mi,,, iii.'in pirates 
" ro a ce uivos, a braes nf pie- 

»«»!» and ■ hnlf down cntlnHW* ulting 
over thflr shoulders, it's a greet life 
oa thv old luinf, 



NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION 

^ Notice is hereby given that the 
Big Bono Springs Hotel and Wa- 
ter Company, Incorporated, is clos- 
ing its business and winding up its 
affairs. 

C. L. BQN1FIELD, President. 

T. A. No lan, Secretary. 

I Can Sell The Earth. 

List yonr farm with mo. Give me 
n trial— just write description and 
number of acres and mail it to 

Wm. B. BAIRD, Erlanger, Kv. 
Erlanger Deposit Batik Bldg. sl8 



Prices the Lowest 

Give Us Your Coal Order. 

Ox Brand Fertilizer, made 
by Tennessee Chemical Co. 
We handle all grades. 

Petersburg Coal Co 

Petersburg, Ky. — 




DR.W.E.FISTER, 

Veterinarian, 

WALTON, KY. 

telephriftip answered night 
or day. 'P hone 2w. 

Alaska has como to the rescue of the 
world la many ways. Now It la Inti- 
mated that It will supplant Sicily as 
tho chief source of sulphur, 



f. W. Kassebasn & Im, 

6R4N1TS & MARBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large 8toch on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipment 

US Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 



< me of the meat pathetic works of 
nrt that can be placed before iku ptib- 
wicm th r Kxmraphie 



lie is a 



aMpirstlon 
started 



staBffll wneu the war 
dunty P.»p»*r, 



Executor's Notice. 

AlltMirHoiiR Indebted to thnoidata 
of K. T. Krut/,, deceased, must como 
forward and nottlo same, those hav- 
liijrolaimH agahiHt xnld entnto must 
present them to the iiiidotHlanod 
prov«u accordinir to law. 

m. Shft >• K" l] T/ - Kxooutrlx. 
Riley A Kiloy, Attys. 



Boone Co. Firms Wanted. 

*— ♦ 

L«^t your farms large or small 
with me, and ret a quitk sale. 
J. W. TALIFKJIRO, 

Erlsnfer, Ky. 







BOONg C..JWTY RECORDER 



itf 



mims mobile 

HOSPITAL UNIT 



i . 



i 



Backed by National Woman's 
SuWragc Association. 



ANGUARD NOW IN FBAKCE 



hospital, Equ-ppcd With Every" Mod- 
- orn Appliance and Staffed Entirely 
by Women, Even to Electricians, 
Mechanics and Laboratory Techni- 
cians, Will Be Stationed in Devas- 
, tated Areas of France. 

Dr. Caroline Flnley !<? now "over 
thero." Bhe 1ms snfoly landed in 
France, Is the welcome news which 
has reached the hridquarlcr* of the 
Nation.! 1 Avncr' ™V ** .." *& 

Association. The ' vanguard of the 



Hi.' unll is now practically prepi 
nnl Is holding Itself ready to depart 
upon reeefpt of a telegram. 

The hospital will he stationed behind 
tho lines in one of the most devastated 
areas in France. While it will be a? 
the call of the French war department 
for the rare, of the military wounded. 
Its direct objective is to build up the 
broken down women and children who 
hare suffered from lack of care during 
the occupation of their towns by war 
forces. 

The four woman doctors In charge of 
this unit are: Dr. Caroline Flnley, 
Dr. Alice Gregory. Dr. Noary Kdwards 
and Dr. Anna von Shelly. 




TOMMY IS FORCED TO 
MAKE FRITZ PRISONER 



ALL BRITONS TO 
"00 THEIR BIT 

Government Begins Final "Comb 

Out" for Men to Swell 

Military Ranks. 



WOMEN MOST 00 SHARE 



.V 



Dr. Caroline Finley. 

womnn'S mobile hospital unit is there- 
fore stationed in that "somewhere" 
which has recently been called "the 
largest town In France." 

As soon as possible, Doctor Flnley 
'wJll cable for her staff. In the mean- 
while Drr Alice Gregory is acting direc- 
tor over here until the unit rejoins Us 
leader in the field. 

This is the unit accredited to tho 

New York Infirmary for Women and 

Children, which was founded by Dr. 

Elizabeth Blackwell. pioneer woman 

physician and pioneer suffragist. It Is 

backed by the National American 

Woman Suffrage association, and was 

formally accepted by the French gov- 

jernment in July, after having been of- 

jfered to the United States, which re- 

ilnctantly declined It, as women are 

fnot eligible to the United States med- 

jical reserve corps. / 

Found the Plumber. 

The hospital is to have 100 beds, 

!«nd, in addition, small flying auxiliary 

•units whose work will be directed from 

the base by means of ambulances. The 

hospital, equipped with every modern 



German Sheds Tears Fearing 

That He Would Not Be 

Taken Captive. 

■ - ¥ ______ 

'The British sergeant wiped the foam 
from his mustache and set the glass 
on the bar. 

"I see Halg took more prisoners to- 
day. Beastly bore, they are. I took 
one once myself — In fact, be inflicted 
himself upon me. 

"He was not a prisoner to be proud 
of," the sergeant continued. "When he 
adopted me I was busy repairing a 
telephone wire. The boys had Just 
gone over the top and I was struggling 
with a half yard of adhesive tape and 
a pair of pliers when something tripped 
over the wire and said : 'Mercy, I am 
your prisoner. I submit. I desire to 
be removed from here.* 

"I whirled around and looked It full 
In the spectacles — It was a very un- 
happy, small-sized Fritz entirely sur- 
rounded by clay. ^ 

M 'Go away, cant you see I'm busy,' 
I said. 

"'I am your prisoner,' he repeated 
^lively. 

'"You're a liar,' I said severely. 
'You run away and be sopie one else's 
prisoner. You're not the sort of pris- 
oner that nppeals to me. Anyway. I'm 
not going to have prisoners thrust upon 
Got you r legs " m i l uf t fllit wi r e. ' \- 



Those Unable to Fight Are Called for 
Other Necessary Service — Econ- 
omy of Effort, Expense and 
Material Demanded.'' 

London.— With 5,000,000 men in uni- 
form, and with other millions, both 
men and women, engaged in occupa- 
tions hardly less directly concerned 
wit!- '' war's prosecution, Eec'~:_i 
Is organizing one more "comb out" to 
find men for military service, and both 
men ai/d women for other essential 
employments. The appeal for men to 
don uniforms and for workers is ac- 
companied by a renewed Insistence 
upon the utmost economy of every ef- 
fort, expense and material. Economy 
Is the watchword of the new national 
service campaign under the direction 
of Sir Auckland Geddes, minister of 
national service. 

"Woman's clothes are the grave of 
an enormous amount of human eneV- 
gy," he said. "New hats alone absorb 
the work of millions of fingers, and 



WORK FOR MAIMED 

Plan for Re-Education of Dis- 
abled American Soldiers. 



whatever effect they may have that- stating of officers, doctors and Iay- 



~rtnr 

"For a moment he looked non- 
plussed. Then he dived into a pocket 
and produced a cheap Swiss watch. 

" 'For you,' he beamed. 'I'm your 
prisoner.' 

"The man's persistence worried me. 
It was then I threw the pork and beans 
can at him. But he only burst into 
tears. 

"I told him I couldn't help his trou- 
bles. If he chose to be born on the 
wrong side of a war like this he must 
take the consequences. And if he kept 
on weeping on the wire, it might cause 
a short circuit. 

"The man's persistence finally wore 
me down. So I marched him off to the 
nearest dressing station. 

"That was my first and last pris- 
oner." 



effect certainly does not Include help- 
ing to beat the enemy. 

"If we are to make tho great ef» 
fort tbnt we should make, if we really 
are going to make the greatest effort 
In our history, our imagination must 
be quickened to understand the effect 
of our smallest actions. Everywhere, 
in practically every home, we are wast- 
ing something. I am sorry to say that 
we have great organizations which ex- 
ist to encourage waste." 

Only Necessities of War. 

klaad— Inslsta. the . govern- 




LIVES ON ARMY PAY 



Muitl-Millionaire Sergeant Gives Wife 
$30 and Lives on Rest. 

Marshal Field HI. grandson of the 
famous Chicago millionaire, is trying 
to live on his army pay. The young 
mnltt-TOttllonalfe is " "giving more 
thought to th*» nickels and dimes he 
spends now than he did to the hun- 
dred dollar bills he formerly spent." 

Young Field, as a sergeant, receives 
$3S-a month. He has instructed the 
paymaster to send $30 of this amount to 
his wife. Field recent ly received his 
second pay, with the $30 deducted, 
leaving only $8. lie already owed $4 
at the battery eunteen for cigarettes 
and candy, his only dissipation, so had 
only $4 left to last a month. 

Sergeant Field has made an excel- 
lent soldier, and has been advanced 
from private to corporal and then to 
sergeant. He volunteered us a private 
early In the war "because the govern- 
ment may need a fdw privates." 



meat is beginning to Insist, the people 
are beginning to understand, that con- 
sumption to a great extent has got to 
stop. The producing capacity of the 
country has got to be saved to turn 
out the absolute necessaries of life 
and of war. 

The case Is being laid before the 
British people now In the very sim- 
plest terms. Not only is everybody 
urged to eat the least possible amount 
of food necessary to maintain good 
physical condition but everybody is 
told that he must wear his clothes 
longer, must be satisfied with patched 
Jboots, must cut down his expenditures 
;for every kind of luxury, for amuse- 
ment. 

But that Is only the beginning. The 
hands that would have been oceupled 
In making the new dress that my lady 
lis not going to buy and that therefore 
'will not be made; the fingers that 
would have employed themselves pre- 
paring the confection of a hat that is 
going to be forsworn; the skill and 
handicraft that would have found oc- 
cupation producing suits of .clothes 
that are not going t o be bought or 



To Be Helped to Rehabilitate Them- 
selves at Useful Citizens of the 
Republic. 

Washington.— Now that our troops 
have begun to actually take part in 
the great war, a great problem will 
soon hnvfe to be faced. It will soon 
have to be faced. It will have to do 
,wlth the re-education of disabled sol- 
|dlers. It will not be enough for the 
government to place those who are 
permanently disabled In soldiers' 
, homes and allow them to complete 
jtheir existence In material comfort, 
but those who are partially disabled 
;SO as to make them unable to return 
I to the occupations and trades which 
i they left to serve their oor<"try will 
.have to be re-educated in some employ- 
ment which will enable them to reha- 
bilitate themselves as useful citizens of 
the republic. 

Although the plans have not pro- 
gressed enough to make a formal 
announcement of their scope, it Is 
known that the war department, 
the surgeon general's office, is working 
on the theory that the re-education 
must commence in the hospital while 
the patient Is convalescent. 

The government will probably fol- 
low closely the plans of the Canadian 
government, which Is to continue its 
■military control over the badly 
iwounded until a competent board con 



BAYONET SAVE 
AMERICAN LIVES 



Escape German Shell When One 

of Party Stops to Dig Up 

Relic. 



TTn-RfTDAY JANUARY JTth, 1fr£T, 

BRITISH SfflPPET 
HE RO IN FIGHT 

Though Mortally Wounded, He 

Refuses to Haul Down 

the Flag. 



SEE SCENES OF DESOLATION 



jmen pronounce the re-education com- 
plete and the soldier ready for new 

•endeavors. 

According to accepted theories, the 
re-employment of the faculties begins 
jln the hospital bed with games and 
puzzles which excite the interest and 
jtake the luku. jft misfortunes. The 
Ibadly maimed often lose courage and 
,h%pe; and have often after previous 
jwars insisted upon being supported by 
the government In soldiers' homes 
.without effort on their own behalf. 



_wi>rn ; all these must Hud employment 
of another kind ; employment ut pro- 
ducing the things necessary, and ab- 
solutely necessary, to nutiounl life and 
national war. 



; ■> 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 ii4i 1 1 t » i f» 

: CONQUEST AND KULTUR :: 

From nil this it appears that 
the Monroe doctrine cannot be 
justified. . . . So it remains 

I only what we Europeans have | | 
described as an Inspiration. And « » 
so It remains only what we Eu- 
ropeans almost universally con- 
sider it, an impertinence. With 
a noisy cry they try to make an ' » 
impression on the world and ', ', 

; succeed, especially with the stu- ' | 
pld. The inviolability of the ! ! 
American soil is invoked with- ' ' 
out there being at hand the '■> '< 
slightest means of warding off | 
the attack of a respectable Eu- « ' 
ropean power.— Johannes Vol- | | 
lert, Alldeutsche Blatter, Jan. « i 
IT, 1903. ' ' 



I I H I IIIII I IIIIIII II Hlt? 



SNAKE OF RARE BEAUTY 



Head Bright as Copper and Body Fine- 
ly Spotted. 

While returning home with an auto 
party recently when near Bronson, 
Ky., Will Bradley discovered a large 
copperhead snake crossing the road in 
front of his machine. 

Steering the machine accordingly, J at nil. 



Dr. Alice Gregory. 

appliance, will be staffed entirely by 

women even to its electricians, me- 

i chanics, laboratory technicians — yes, 

and plumbers. But qp to rewnA date 

|no one of the woman plumpers of the 

[Vicinity had been free to go. Atheud- 

jquarters, in New York, who*a? the 41 

nurses and nurses' assistants are qow 

' iftelng rapidly equipped to be ready for 

Doctor FInley's hurry call, secretaries 

ireported that thero were plenty of 

(woman plumbdrs, but none available 

[for France. 

And then one day tho unit found tho 

plumber. Before the war she was Just 

jono of those natural-born woman 

geniuses who can mend anything from 

Uhe coffee urii to tho ruluwuter spout 

'with a luru of her baud and a wire 

hairpin --but when the war began to 

bring odt the industrial need uf women 

' jM nrllnniiM, hIk- thought it about tluiw 

n . W tOkO ft scientific ruurw In Hi., irmle 

T mV 1 * h " 1 ' im,n «'«rrjrlnf on with such 

(Pbois AM "«he I. ml In the limine, " and 

aba Joined the hospital unit ua a plu- 
perfect plumber. 

Ready far Service. 
• Dr. Anna van Himiiy, In rtsrge of 

publicity for the volt, deafer* that 



i he run over the snake, which some- 
what impeded its progress. He then 

I alighted and killed the snake, which 
proved to be one of the prettiest speci- 
mens of the copper head family ever 
seen in this part of the state. 

Being a femule, its head was as 
bright as burnished copper, while the 
underneath portion of its body was al- 
most equally bright. Its back and 
sides were covered with the most beau- 
tiful spots, and its fangs, with which 
it delivered its bite, were extraordin- 
arily long. 



Domestic Service a Problem. 
Particular attention is being given 
to the problems of domestic service, 
which represent Immense wastes of 
human energy. Nowadays a woman Is 
likely to lose her social standing if 
she advertises for a servant, especial- 
ly If she mentions in the advertise- 
ment, as many English housewives do, 
that her establishment Is based on the 
butler and three maids model, or the 
butler, houseman and four maids 
model, or something of that sort. For 
her advertisement Is likely to become 
the basis of derisive comment by folks 
who wonder why the butler is not in 
uniform and some of the maids at 
least in a munitions factory. 

"While the authorities who are hunt- 
ing for man power and woman power 
insist that nltngr-ther too much of it 
is wasted in domestic service, house- 
holders declare that it is becoming 
practically impossible to get service 
Moreover, it is likely to con- 



Seek Help of Children. 

Washington.— rians for enlisting 
the services of the children of the 
country iu the c ampaign to save coal 
are being cut by the conservation di- 
vision of the federal fuel administra- 
tion. Boy scouts and school children 
generally are iu a position to aid In 
the coal conservation campaign, by 
making use of waste products which 
can be utilized as fuel. 



Big Saving in Sugar. 
Washington.— An annual saving of 
16,000,000 pounds of sugar and 12,- 
000,000 pounds of shortening is the 
estimate made by the cracker manu- 
facturers of the country as a result of 
the new rules made for them by the 
United States food administration. 



GIRL GETS TEN RABBITS 

Brought Them Down In the Course 
of Three Hours. ~ K 1 

Miss Mabel Fonstcrmuker of Salis- 
bury township can lay claim (0 being 
dm of the most successful gunners iu 
Luhlgh county, Pennsylvania. 

Her two brothers being off to war, 
she .ihoiildered her gun, and after 
beating the tleld.i around her fnlhei m 
home, u turned in ibrue huum with tho 
limit of tan rabbit* for one iluy. 

She \H the 001} gU iMuhoutM 

who succeeded in jetting the t 
litnit without I bo uld ot a dog. Nbe 
aw to shoot at a rnbblt found sit- 
ting on the around and sjwaja ska* 
thorn up to bluM at these while the* 
.•uu. 



Unue so for a long ""period, because 
women, young and old, who have 
tasted the satisfaction of that more 
independent existence that is vouch- 
safed to other workers are almost 
without exception determined that they 
will never go back Into domestic serv- 
ice. 

Here is the formula for the mobili- 
zation ol* national man power and nn- 
liiiual financial resources: Discharge^ 
your servants and see that they get 
enlisted in national service. Save the 
money that you would have paid them 
in wages and buy war bonds. The 
government will pay that money to 
your former servants as wnges for 
making munftfons. The rest of the 
money that you save by reason of cir- 
cumscribing your domestic establish- 
ments will be deftly takbu away from 
yon by the government through Its In- 
strumentalities of taxation nnd used 
lo maintain the armies In Franco and 
In almost all the other Quarters of tho 
uorld. An. . I her energy (hut Is being 
lapped Is iltu great cluss of women 
who have mver imuKlnod that U wua 
of their llf». lo emjuge In gainful 
IU. ic u. Item 

■ igluml by a k*mmI 
of thouaanda Chan there wan baton 
tho war. But I here ere Mill umny of 
them, and the effort hi Ut eoilst ibaos 
tor useful settle* 



NOW SKILLED MECHANICS 




Once Richly Cultivated Valleys 

Speckled With Happy Villages, 

Now But a Sodden Panorama 

of Churncd-Up Soil. 

With the French Armies in the Field. 
— If one of the party hadn't stopped to 
dig up a Boche bayonet from the road- 
side, this piece wouldn't have been 
written, 

— Th e Fren ch- ofBi ' g r -cnaporYme an fTTus 
charges had tarried ou the way back 
to Verdun from one of the outlying 
forts to chat with a bunch of Red 
Cross men, and Incidentally to watch 
the antics of a flock of German air- 
planes as they dodged in and out 
among the feathery puffs of shrapnel. 
The usual dally artillery strafe had 
been on for some hours. Hundreds of 
tons of metal had been bowling above 
our heads from both sides, far up and 
down the line. At times there was a 
shot for every second. But so far the 
Boche targets had been located a com- 
fortable distance away. 

Our officer had given the word to re- 
sume the Journey, and the chauffeurs 
were cranking -up, when the oppor- 
tunity of gathering in another battle- 
field souvenir intervened. It is still 
there. 

Careful figuring, conducted very 
shortly thereafter in one of the Red 
Cross dugouts nearby, convinced the 
whole party that if It hadn't been for 
the bayonet episode our cars would 
have collided with the big Boche shell 
Just at the moment of its explosion 
about a block down the road. 
: — Th e ea p e ii e n cc bad m e r e ly supplied 
a vivid final touch to impressions al- 
ready acquired — of what the soldiers 
of Verdun have been undergoing in 
the last eighteen months. In this re- 
gion Nature has been given no oppor- 
tunity, as she has, for example, on 
the battlefield of the Somme, to repair 
as best she can the ravages of war. 
From the top of one of the battered 
forts that now forms an unbreakable 
ring about Verdun— recaptured from 
the Germans with a valor and at a 
sacrifice of life that will make its name 
Immortal In history — stretches out, as 
far as ten-ply, made-in-Germany binoc- 
ulars can reach, a vista of utter devas- 
tation. > 

Scene of Desolation. 
Once thickly forested hills and rich- 
ly cultivated valleys speckled with 
happy villages ; now a sodden, grayish, 
monotonous panorama of churned-up 
soil, crisscrossed here and there with 
trfeqehes, and only an occasional stump 
or pile of crumpled stones to evidence 
its former beauty. It's like Notre 
Dame de Lorette, Vimy, Wytschete, 
Messines and Passchendaele Ridge all 
scrambled together. 

AH the forces of nature — fire, flood, 
hurricane and earthquake — could not 
have wrought such havoc. Only man 
could do It. Even looking backward, 
the ouly discernible color is the green 
of the distant hills, the shattered red- 
tiled roofs of the fortress city, a*nd the 
clusters of purple-wreathed graves 
where sleep the men who made the 
motto of Verdun — "On *»e posse pas" 
(No trespassers allowed !) — a reality. 
The Germans now occupy much the 
same line as that from which the 
crown prince launched his costly -but 
futile attack upon this stronghold. Prec 
viously we had traversed the valley of 
the Ma me whose landscape bears am- 
ple testimony to the characteristic 
French traits of dash, mobility and re- 
sourcefulness ; Just as Verdun's piti- 
fully harrowed hillsides will always be 
a monument to the hitherto less famil- 
iarly known French qualities of tire- 
less energy nnd dogged stubbornness. 
Land Grimly Held by French. 
Then on through the forest of the 
Vosges down to where France In the 
early days of the war plucked, and still 
tightly clutches, a bit of what used to 
be hers. It's only a few square miles 
—Just about equal 



GOES TO BOTTOM WITH SHIP 



"I'm Done; Throw Books Overboard/* 
He Says, and Orders the Crew to i 
Save- Themselves — Lauded by 
Prime Minister. 

London. — The following, from the 
Daily Telegraph, is a story of unusual 
heroism and the winning of a Victoria 
Cross : 

"In the speech in which he proposed 
that the thanks of parliament be ac- 



The photograph shows one of the girl 
machinists at work In the plant of the 
General Electric company at Philadel- 
phia. ', 

Knowing that many of their men 
would volunteer for service nnd others 
be taken for the new National army,' 
the company ndded a number of women 
to their machine-shop staff. They have 
made good and as rapidly as men leave 
women step Into their places, keeping 
things going with remits Just as good, 
If not better, (ban thoso obtained dur- 
ing male operation of in* work*. Worn- 
mi appear at workbenches and drills, 
at cutters nnd heavy nteasea, There 
!■ nothing Hint ib.y haven't ti 
hands at. The fnct that women have 
nude goud In the htg shops ol the rail 
rued* luta led many other large cer» 
potatieM to pemanantly onuet the 
tolr oeee la their terYke. 



to the plot of 
ground that Belgium now holds of her 
own ravished country — but entirely 
sufficient to exemplify aud Justify an- 
other fine French trait. Intense pride 
of accomplishment. 

"Alsace Ueconquise!" proudly reads 
the sign over a little shop fronting the 
badly scarred old church In the public 
i square of Thann. Nearly all the old 
signs have been changed from German, 
but some have been retained Just for 
souvenirs. In this corner of the "lost 
provtnees" there is no doubt how the 
people stand. 

Are the people of France war-weary? 
Tes; so are those of all Europe. But 
;thcy- arc not weary to the point of 
even thinking of giving up tho strug- 
'gle, despite, or, rnther, because of, the 
fact that of all the allies Prance's httr- 
;dens and her sacrifice In blood and des- 
olated homes has been the greatest. 
i In a tour of the war zone and of the 
.provincial towns behind the lines, from 
|the channel to Switzerland, one may 
[find everywhere abundant evidence of 
'arelentl. mlnntlon. among twffi 

soldiers ami boinefolLs, t.. *.•« the 
thing through. 

But Ho- pi. -dominant xeutlment In 
France today Is on« of intense grutl- 
tiuiv that America has come In to help. 
Any fleeting doubts as to the outcome 
were dispelled with the arrival of the 



corded to the nation's heroes, the prime 
minister spoke In glowing terms of the 
men of the fishing fleets, and moved 
the house to cheers as he told of a 
trawler skipper who, with both legs 
shot off and most of his crew killed or 
injured, refused to haul down the flag, 
amve the order, 'Throw the confidential' 
books overboard, and throw me after 
them,' and went down with his trawler. 
The story thrilled the whole country 
and now, In a special supplement to the 
London Gazette, comes the sequeL It 
is announced that a posthumous grant 
of the Victoria Cross has been made to 
Skipper Thomas Crisp. R. N. R., 10,065, 
D. A. (killed in action), and that the 
Distinguished Service medal has been 
awarded to Second Hand Thomas Wil- 
liam Crisp, R. N. R., O. N., 4,332, D. A. 
"These two men are father and son, 
nnd the record of their brave deeds wIB 
take a foremost place even among the 
many wonderful stories of gallantry 
which this war has produced. 
Submarine Is Sighted. 
"On an August afternoon, at about a 
quarter to three, the trawl was shot 
from the smack Nelson. The skipper 
was b e l ow p a c king fish ; o n e 'hand w as 
on deck cleaning fish for the next 
morning's breakfast. Coming on deck, 
Mr. Crisp saw an object on the hori- 
zon, examined it closely and sent for 
his glasses. Almost directly he sang 
out. 'Clear for action. Submarine.' He 
had scarcely spoken when a shot fell 
about a hundred yards away on the 
port bow. The motorman got to his 
motor; the deckhand dropped his fish 
and went to the ammunition room; 
while the other hands, at the skipper's 
orders, 'Let go your gear,' let go the 
warp, and put a 'dan* on the end of it 
"Meanwhile the gunlayer held hie 
fire, until the skipper said, It is no use 
waiting any longer, we will have to let 
them have it' From the distance the 
submarine sent shell after shell at the 
smack, and at the fourth shot the shell 
went through the port bow Just below 
the waterline. 

"There was no confusion on. board, 
not even when the seventh shell struck. 
the skipper, passed through his side, 
through the deck and out through the 
side of the ship. The second hand at 
once took charge of the tiller" and the - 
firing continued. All the time water 
was pouring into the ship and she was 
sinking. One man, the gunlayer, went 
to the skipper to see if he could render 
first aid, but it was obvious that he wae 
mortally wounded. 

"'It's all right, boy, do your best,' 
said the skipper, and then, to the sec- 
~3tid hand, 'Send a message off.* This 
was the message: 'Nelson being at- 
tacked by submarine. Skipper killed. 
Send assistance at once.' With the 
shlp_ainking and only five rounds of 
ammunition left, the second hand went 
to the skipper, who was lying there on 
the deck, and heard him say, 'Abandon 
ship. Throw the books oxerboard.' 
Down With Hia Vessel. 
"He was asked then if they should 
lift him Into the boat, but his answer 
was : 'Tom, I'm done ; throw me over- 
board.' He was in too bad a condition 
to be moved, and they left him there 
on his deck and took to the small boat, 
nnd about a quarter of an hour afterr 
ward the Nelson went down by the 
head. 

"It was drawing Into dusk as they 
left and the crew of the boat pulled all 
that night. Toward morning the wind 

"""""tttrti ttrttj t/ttT»\ tTTvITi Out tTT uZcUr 

course. They pulled all day, fastening 
a pair of trousers and a large piece of 
oilskin to two oars to attract attention. 
Once a vessel was sighted, and once a 
group of minesweepers, but they pass- 
ed out of sight. At night the weather 
became finer. Through the night they 
pulled, until daybreak, and at half- 
past ten o'clock in the morning they 
found a buoy and made fast to It. By 
afternoon they were sighted and res- 
cued. The second hand, who took 
charge of the tiller after the skipper 
had been shot down, was his son." 






OPENS THEATER NEAR 
BIG TRAINING CAM' 



r 



Camp Gordon, Gn. — To p 
more entertainment for ' 
rules la the cantor 
from New York u> 
tlous east ami n 
some aoutherp 
Wane, manager 
Lyric theal ' 
vaudeville. ■ 
Dieted a hay 
camp and l 
ahow house 
within a i 
prices will 

eeeeeeee« 







BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSl 



■^ 



■B^M^HH^H 



wmmh 



' 



▼ ^r* 



THURSDAY JANUARY 17th, 1917. 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



I 




rsnnur- *\n nmnonCCi Honrv Louie T.innrr, of Hope-fu 

BOONE CO. R ttUKUZn -.wight -mhooil, h em out the S 0. 




S tall .Monday morning, and etev-1 
i n o1 lus neighbors responded 
and t'ic crowd did much good 
Work in clearing the public roads 
■ <i »now in that neighborhood 
Tln> same kind of work was done 
that day by groups of men in so v- 
tial other neighborhoods in the 
county, but tho snow that fell 
Monday afternoon and that night 
W*&-} the roads in as bad condi- 
uott as they were before the re- 
lief parties went over them 



AMERICA'SWAR AIMS. 

Fourteen Elements Presented as 
Necessary to the Tranquili- 
ty of World. 

The following foiii I in oardjna 
principle* were sei forth >y Pr»**- 

dont vV'ilson as essen.i.il to v.uriu 



Should a warm rain fall on top 
of the vast volume of snow that 
covers the ground there is no 
telling <thc amount of property 
that 'will l>e destroyed, while 
many towns along the river 
•would be flood stricken That 
the destruction that i» bound to 
result from a general thaw m;iv 
be kept at the minimum every one 
hopea to see the snow disappear 
gradually While the people are 
tired of gazing upon the beautiful 
and will be glad when it is gone 
they do not desire "to see it go 
too hurriedly 



FINDS BIBLE PROPHECIES 

On the Great War-West Vir- 
ginia Clergyman Declares 
Jan. 27, 1918, Is a Date 
to Be Watched. 



"1 Opon covenants of peace, Op- 
enly arrived at. ait or wiiieh there 
shall be no private int e rna tional 
understandings of any kind 1ml <li 
plomacy shall pro ceed always 
frankly and in tne public view. 

"2 Absolute freedom oi navigdS 
tion upon the seas, outside terri- 
torial waters alike in peace anu 
in war, e.xcept as the seas may 
be closed in whole or in part by 
international action for the en- 
forcement oi international coven- 
ants 

"3. The removal 
sible, of all economic 
the establishment 
of trade conditions among all the 
nations consenting to the peace 
and associating themselves, for its 
maintenance. 

"4 Adequate guarantee given 
and taken that national arma- 
ments will be r educ e d to the 
lowest point consistent with do- 
mestic safety. 

5" A free, o]H-ji-.in' u .i..,.' ...*! al> 
solulely impartial adjustment of 
all colonial claims, batted upon a 
strict observance of the principle 
that in determining all such ques- 
tions of sovereignly the interests 
oi th" populations concernea 

m u s t have -equal weigh t with tha 

equitable claims of the Govern- 
ment "whose title is to lie deter- 
mined. 

" The evacuation of all Russian 
territory and such a settlement of 
all questions affecting Russia as 
will secure the best and freest co- 
operations of the other nations 
of the world i^ obtaining for her 
an unhampered and unembarras- 
sed opportunity for the independ- 
ent determination of her own po- 
litical development and national 
policy, and assure her oi a Sin- 
cere welcome into the society of 
free nations under the institutions 
of her own choosing; and, more 
than a welcome, assistance also 
-of every kind that she may need 
and may herself desire. The treat- 
ment accorded Russia by her sis- 
ter nations in the months to come 
will be the acid test of their good 
will, of their comprehension of her 
reeds as distinguishing from their 
own interests, and of their intelli- 
gent and unselfish sympathy. 

Belgium, the whole ' world 
will agree, must be evacuated and 
restored, without any attempt to 
limit the sovereignty which she 
employs in common with all other 
free nations. No other single act 
will serve as this will serve to 
restore confidence among the na- 
tions in the laws which they have 
themselves set and determined for 
the government of their relations 
with bno another. Without this 
healing net the whole structure 
and validity of international law 
is forever impaired. 

"8 All French territory ehoufd be 
freed and the invaded portions re- 
stored, «nd the wrong done to 
Franee by Prussia in 1871 in the, 
matter of Alsace-Lorraine, which 
has unsettled the peace of the 
world for nearly 50 years, should 
be righted, in 'order that peace 
may once more be made secure 
in the interest oi all. 

"9 A readjustment of the fron- 
tiers of Italy should be effectea 
along clearly recognizable lines of 
nationality. 

"10 The people of Austria-Hun 
gary, whose place among the na- 
tions we wish to see safeguarded 
and assured, should be accorded 
the freest opportunity of autono- 
mous deveolpment. 

"11. Roumania. Serbin and Mon- 
tenegro should be evacuated ; occu 
pied territories restored ; Serbia 
accorded free and secure access 
to the sea, and the relations of 
the several Balkan States to one 
another dtermined by friendly 
counsel along historically estab- 
lished lines of allegianee and na- 
tionality; and international guar- 
antees of the political and econo- 
mic independence and territorial 
integrity of the several Balkan 
States should be entered into. 

"12. The Turkish portions of the 
present Ottoman Empire should 
be assured u secure sovereignty, 
but the other nationalities which 
are now under Turkish rule 
should be assured .in undoubted 
security of lifc-^nd an absolutely 
k dnmol: k «ted opportunity of autono 
development, and the Dar- 
•s should be permanently 
l^ed as a free passage to the 
^nd commerce of all nations 
MtU.ipternationa! giinrnntw-t. 

ependeni Polish state 
rected, which should 

enitoies inhabited 
I'olish populations 

assured a free 
to the 

i < conomtc 
it inresr 

,.d 1>\ In 



The Rev. R Cary Montague, of 
hlkins, W. Va , formerly superin- 
tendent of the D. and B schools 
there, writes the following Iftterl 
to thi» Randolph, W. Va , Enter- f 
prise. Whether these i*eferenc- 
es have a bearing on oirr World 
War or not they are interesting: 
Recently my attention was call- 
ed to the 13th Chapter of the 
Hook of Revelations as nppying t > 
the present world conditions. . i! 
have always looked upon Bible 
prophecies as being either tool 
deep or too vague to be applied! 
accurately to our own times, so 
I Ix-g.iii my own investigation! 
\vith little or no enthusiasm, but I 
the more J read this chapter; 
and compared it with events at t 
ieveral of the Burlington r-iti- £•*»*»* and of the past three j 
zlhs. equipped with shovels, went >"; a "' , th f e moro I ^ame inter- 
out on the Florence ni ke Tu esday ' V stt(1 - not . g » prophet, but (mere- 
morning to assist in opening ft j >>' *" " st . u . d t nt - hopH»g--th«rt- yow-- 

| readers will investigate for them- _ 

I selves and correct me if I am ' 

wrong in any of my statements. 



pen in g 

up for travel They found pleat 
of shoveling to do 



Red Gross Notes. 



sent last week. 



11 



Bullittsville 
pairs socks, 7 sweaters, 9 shirts 

Belleview sent in 16 pairs wrist- 
lets, 21 pairs soaks, 3 helmets, 5 
sweaters, 3 mufflers, six shirts 



Verse 1 reads. And 1 stood up- 
on the sands of the sea ana 
saw a beast rise up out of 
the sea having seven heads and 
ten horns and upon his hornsten 
crowns and upon his head the; 
name of blasphemy. 

Reference to any encyclopedia 



417 compresses, II slings,"? sculte- S„ 8l « OW that " T J** Ftl™*? » Em " 

tus bandages pire ** com PO&ed of the fojlow- 

j so far as pos- Belleview since thev organized f n S (twenty-six states and divis 

mic barriers and in July, have sent in the follow- "> n ?: T * e kingdom of Prussia, Ba- 

oi an equality ing finished work: 193 shirts, six J"™*} »«ony and Wurtonburg ; 

abdominal bandages, 32 slings, 1196 ff* ft^rS^l ° ? ad ™' ^f* 6 

compresses 14 sweaters, 10 muf- ^^n^g, Schwerin. Mecklen- 

flers, 36 pairs wristlets, i hel- *"? r «» StreUvz, Oldenburg and Sax- 

mets, 38 pairs socks, f> scultetus ^,~"™ r .' v th % **&?* , ot Anhslt, 

bandages, 60 pillows ^KV,,-^ k 4n. SaX " A1 ,S ?n « Ur5f ' ™ ?** 

Florence sent in 213 4-inch com ^ T fC^°^ *** ^f T Meuun 

presses, 140 9-inch compresses, 11 **" ' *Jf principalities of Leppe- 

riirs socks - Detmold, Reuss-Schliez, Scham 

All members of the Burlington j^g-Lippe, Schwartzbmg Soders 

Auxiliary who have not received ^"^ bchwartzburg Rudolstaui 

buttons can get them at the Peo- and * aldeck-Pryrnont ; the fre? 

pies Deposit Bank, Riddell's store towns of Bremen, Hamburg ana 

or Red Cross Headquarters in the Lubeck, and the imperial terii- 

court house ? ry 0l A ' sa ce-Lor: aaine (Enc. Brit 

Petersburg unit sent in the fol- Vo1 - ]*> f„ 8 ?rVL. «. .^.^ ^.._ 

lowing articles: Six sweaters, S A( " 

pairs Sbcks, a wasn rags, b mUB- ") B1, y 

lin shirts, 1080 gauze strips, 100 ?. la8 , s 01 pohtical divisions and we 

9-inch compresses, 20 gauze rolls, f,nd ( an empire composed of 87 

1440 gauze sponges, 20 four inch Pfft*- J h » beast had 27 parts, I 

compresses, five T bandages, five heads > 10 o b° rns . and 4 . 10 "°^ ns -. 

™ Q J.- toii^U i«i f«.„. +oii \ Verse 2 describes the beast giv- 
ing him the brutality of the bear. 
The blood thirstiness of the lion 



To those who Have Sold To- 
bacco to Thompson & 
Wingate. 

We will not receive any of our 
purchase of tobacco at Pet- 
ersburg. Your contracts call 
for delivery at Aurora and 
the unusual price was paid 
to insure its being brought 
to the Aurora Loose Leaf 
Market the best in the coun- 
try. 

All tobacco must be in 
good, winter order. No wet 
or fat-stemmed will be ac- 
cepted. Dealers make a dif- 
ference of 10 to 15 cents in 
price where it is found in 
this condition. All tobacco 
nojv__slripped must be hung 
befoc delivered. 

We are sorry river con- 
ditions have delayed delive- 
ry, but must ask our friends 
to be patient. We are ready 
to receive and pay for all to- 
bacco contracted for as/soon 
as ferrying is resumed at 
Aurora. . • 

THOMPSON & 
WINGATE. 




many tailed, 15 four tailes 



Report of Boone Counrr Chapter in V "' uu " """"nesso, i ne UU n 
A. R. C. for month ending Decern-. and , the d « cei * and treachery of 
ber 31 1917- • " & leopard, all of which charac- 

*7Kfl n« ' teristics have be»>n shown by the 
' world's enemies in this 



Balance on hand December 



Verona A. R. C. Drive. (56 61 j. 

70 00 1 Ver9e 3 read9 . 



present 

Verona membership drive 70 00 Ver9e 3 read „ A d j saw on< s 

Walton A. R.O. drive 104 (X) of hiH head , 8 a8 it we re, wounded 

^Girl's r ° m P ' 6 00 &***%£ " d hifl deadly WOUnd 

Walton Christmas member. i ff ^welT^»owiJ-rhat theKais- 

stiipump. .. X; e>r has been operated on for can- 

Walton knitting needles 3 00 ce r of t he throat, which is us- 

Burlingtoii, balance ou A. R. _ I tla ll y a deadly disease, but he 
• C. drive . ... . , 60 ha8 Covered, 

Burlington Cliristmas men.- Verse 5 « And therE> was givep 

bership drive . . 321 X \ him a mouth speaking | pea 'J 

Burlington Junior Auxilary lo 00 thin and bla8phe my, and power 

Burlington donation 1 00 , u as given .unto him to conUnue 

Hebron Christmas member- 1 forty and two months" 

ship drive 104 00, G & &t thing8 and b i a9p hemy ! 

Hebron knittuig need es 3 00 )x , tter de8cri ^ tion could t ^ ere be 

Hebron Odd-Fellows lodge lb 00 ( of the Kaiser's speeches, when 
Lnion Christinas membership he tells his troops that the^ 

drive. . . . it,4 oo are the c h osen of God and that 

o! 0r »"!rl*...i ; d "' l h 71 S E h» is God's vice regent, and then 

he sends forth his soldiers to 
rob and rape, pilage and burn 
an innocent neutral country like 
Belgium, and his diplomats to he 



Richwood do. do. do 
Belleview do. do. do . . 

Petersburg, do. do. di> 

" Junior membership . 

Constance Christmas mem- 
bership drive 

Rabbit Hash do. do, d<> 



1G 00 

I OS 00 
132 (X) 

* , and deceive 
, Verses t,6, 7, 8. 9 and 10 are 
descriptive of Germany's early sue 
cesses in the war, and the fate 



K 00 



proceeds fromsupper 67 70 , which await8 hn . 



Bullittsville Christmas mem- 
bership drive . .' 

Beaver do. do. do 

'• donation front Masonic 
lod^e and others 



.,- 1 Verses 11 and 12 "And I beheld 
j<i (in an other beast coming out of the 
4 J 00 earth; and he had two horns like 

...'a lamb, and ha spoke a»a dragon, 
And ho exercised all the power 



«»•(•>- hj °^ * np ' ti'' 8 t beast before him and 

'*- -' '*' causeth the earth and them w ; hich 

; dwell therein to worship the first 

Is l>east whose 'deadlv wound was 



Total 

K.\i>< nditurts: 
Clermont Co. Woolen Mi 

sock yarn $ 50 05 healed " 

LouisStixCo.knittingneedles 8 58 ] Austria-Hungary, the ally of 
W. H. Btanage C<i.. stationery 1 4S Germany, is an empire composed 
Alins& Doepke Co.. yarn 80-86 of two kingdoms, often known as 

Secretary, postage and ex- I the dual monarchy, as S# John 

pressage, etc 10 00 puts it "having two hpips as a 

Max WocherCo., I bale gauze 158 <X) lamb" Her part in tBv 'war has 
John Hibbeii Drygoods Co.. I • lx?en that of the understudy of 

bale muslin. ' 535 30 Germany, the willing tool of the 

Max Wncher Co., 1 bale gauze 153 00 Kaiser, Her troops have been at 
American Red Cross member- his disposal, she began the wa» 

ship dues 631 75 when he was ready in accordance 

John Hibben Dry good a Co.. ; with his wishes, (see Gerard's 



name' of the German government— 
the name of (the beast ; the 
name of the persons to whom the 
card is issued and a number, «» 
"no man may buy nor aellisave 
that he hath the mark or the 
narne of the beast or the number 
of lus name," 

No isuch plan as this has ever 
been adopted before by any coun- 
y limy, and, probably nor 
other country but efficient Germ- 
any could have devised ®uch a 
thorough Bystem, and it is cert>- 
ainly remarkable that it should 
have been so well described in vis- 
ion nearly two thousand years be- 
fore being put into operation^ 

Verse 1$ : "Here is wisdom Let 
him that hath understanding count 
the number of the beast for it is 
the number of a man and his 
number is sixhundred, three score 
and %ix," 

This prophecy applies then not 
only to. a government but to a 
man and the number 666 is espe- 
cially connected with that man 

Another reference to an encyclo- 
pedia will sbow that the Kaiser 
was born January 27th, 1859. A 
chronology of the present world 
catastrophe will ahow that the 
Kaiser was born on Jan, 27, 1859. 
A chronology of the present 
world catasrophe will show that 
Austria (largely at Germany's in- 
stigation) invaded Serbia on July 
27, 1914 Do a little arithmetic and 
you will find that it is 666 months 
to the very day from the datej 
of the Kaiser's ' birth to the be- 
ginning of the great war, 

Looking b*ack at verse 5 we are 
told that "power was given unto 
him to continue forty and two 
months" Counting from July 27, 
1914, we find that this brings 
us to Jan, 27, 1918, the Kaiser's 
r.ext birthday, when if this proph 
ecv is true and correct his power 
will be broken by death, political 
reform or military defeat, 

WATCH JANUARY 27, 1918 



Knitting entton 



a 46 Letters) in other words she"caus 
! eth the earth and them that 



Total 
Balance on I 



SIBSO 42 dwea therein to worship the first 
landJany l, mis" B96 87 i 'T a8t \ al ?° i Auc ! tri . 9 - Hun ? ar y j* 



almost a land-locked empire as 





*2'"7 i<» ' s t John says "she cometh up out 

Number uf member, added to "" '>* tho earth" and not out of the 

Chapter in ChriMnms driv- |-jr,l h:> £ as * . h « £"* , b £f t ^^ 

T-.tal number of ...embers hi V ^ sc 13 Ami he doeth great 

( . rJV( , .,,.-. wonders so that he maketh fire 

Cash collected from Christmas " j come down from heaven on the 

m. • mt„. ruiiiri drive « i '«u earth in the sight oi men, 

\ B U VAKFII Tr.-ns i The German troops were the 

! first and I think the only ones 
I to us© liquid fire to the con- 
sternation of their opponents," 



K. 1). GOODRIDGE, Sect. v. 




A. M. 

7:.i0 . H b.lnw I :(hi 

tt-oo 1 8 b ft low 2:(X) 

y::ai U below 8:0q 

I0:(K) B below ;5:80. 

lo : ;UJ .. Rhelusv fcflfi 

11:00 7 below 10:(X» 

ll :.it» . ti below 

IU:(Xi I below 



\'.M. 'or in th* foreheads and that no 
t below I man might buy or s<li; rhvo he 
., b,i,,w that had the mark or the na me 
f> below ef the Ix-ast or the number of 
•', In low his name," 
, 'below ! In Germany for the pas. two 

II below years the necessities oi liit- I»hv*» 
been so ftcaffie, l»ut «) well dis- 
Itributod, tluu thev naVS devised 



icr "- M.li.or ,.f tin. tb, riiiooifli.o- !» <al<1 «y»t»m. whereby every per 



^■■B WSSJMfO. 



Id under »v 
\th*» purpos'' 
;Vu«r4tite« of 
* and tem- 
ndamsll 



time lei wren that in. or and morning 

the iiiereuis bogStl to rise and had 
in iiHitiu at I a. in., and 

llttH l.ot been heloW SillOH. 

Morris, who reside** Oil the 

iiiiito|is p.xt soiitf or t«»wn, iw s w a g - 
, W et to town ,Ate Haturday ev«- 
oIi.k »ud whih Ii#»r« sacurud shougb 
Utwrsturs to run him ovtir 8mulay. 
Ths ground baa not bsnu «nUr«ly 
rid of suos slu«^ December 7th. 



every week ehowniv; the limouut 
(ami .. iy nm-all amount H 1», 
too. ul l.iv.ol oi |i..;.»lo. « ... 

which may l«o pui during 

nd if Oil 

i n t he * 

■ • iNxtirht of 
that trtioto until H ning ol 

; Iter STSSk .Old the IsSUSDCi 

I miti«ir»tiuid Ho* 
cardl bsvs punted oo thsm th* 



STATE NEWS. 



Winchester —Weather conditions 
continue unfavorable #.or farm 
work, the past week being one of 
the worst ever experienced in the 
history of Eastern Kentucky 
♦♦♦♦ 
Paris — The tobacco barn of 
Charles Lear, near Millersburg, 
was destroyed by fire originating 
in the stripping room A large 
crop of tobacco housed in the 
building was also destroyed, 
♦♦♦♦ 
Ashland,— Sheriff J. L. Cox, of 
Carter county, died at his home 
His death was marked by coinci- 
dence to that he expired on the 
54th anniversary of his birth anci 
on the day when his term of of- 
fice as Sheriff expired, 
♦♦♦♦ 
Ashland — Three prisoners, John 
Branham, Prank Williams and Ear 
nest Dove, escaped from the Cat- 
b ttsburg jail Their escape was 
effected by sawing through steel 
barB of the cells Officers believe 
the men were furnished with saws 
by womrm who visited the jail 
♦♦♦♦ 
(leorletown— As long as this 
sheet of snow reraalus covering 
the farms there can l>e but little 
activity among the farmers, Even 
stripping tobacco has been held 
up and the be.nn people wait in 
great anxiety the melting ol the 
snow 

♦♦♦♦ 
Versailles;— The pastt week has 
been a moid dlsgreeablr one for 
the farmer 'Work has been :il .i 
standstill and nothing has been 
but fe-ed ;inil euro for Stock The 
post year nSfl been I hi- most pros- 
perous one for the firmer, and be 
h:iH about doubled the prh '• Ofl iK 

.roducts 

♦♦♦♦ 

m Sterling The I, i i.as 

l een a cold, snowy, i!l»ugrrtfsbti< 

.nd lllllr esi-ept 

iriug for si 

it tin an fed ill bill ll" 



HILL'S 

SEEDS 



Meet all Requirements from 

PURITY 
to 



PRODUCTIVENESS 



Ou» seeds are the result of years of careful breeding 
and testing and of knowing where and when to buy. 

The Hill Standard in Seeds is the highest it is possi- 

♦ 

ble to attain, yet we strive for improvement. 

Confidence in the house of HILL continues to grow 
just as surely as HILL'S SEEDS GROW. 

We will be pleased to send Samples and Quote 
Prices. Let us hear from you. We'll Save You Money 

United States Food Administration License Number G-01206. 




Phone Order Dept. S. 1855 or 1856. 



Capital Stock $30,000. Surplus $45,000 
THE 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 



Burlington, Kentucky. 



Desires your business; and it is our ambition 
to render you the best service possible 

All business entrusted to us will receive 
prompt and careful attention 

When we can be of service to you, do not 
hesitate to command us 

3 Per Cent on Time Depoeits. 




THE TROTTING STALLION 

ST. ALPHONSUS 2:241 

By CHARLEY HERR, the iron horse 
of the. grand circuit 

Will make a season at Er- 
langer Fair Grounds in 1918. 
$20.00 to insure a living foal. 
Get your mares booked early. 
O. M. ROGERS, Owner. J. F. RAFFERTY, Agent. 



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M 

from H.l..«. 

Ht'M'k I I 

ill w b< 

i-i "Urn »<• 



(»»ed, but 
it in t hi* p p. 



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BOONE COUNTY MOTOR CAR CO. 

(Not Incorporated) 

. FORD SALES AND SERVICE, 
TIRES, TUBES AND ACCESSORIES. 

Wc arc now prepared to deliver your car immediately 

Give ua your Order before the Price go up. 

Touring Cars, $36000. Runabouts, $345.00. 



=3 



I . O. II. llotrott. 



ILh 



SENOUR & HICKS. 

UNION, KENTUCKY. 

SESSOCSS5 



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— — 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 




^VYOU CAN SAVE FROM^> 

50c to $ 1 .00 

On certain lines of Merchandise, especially SHOES— by 
buying here now. We have quite a few numbers of 
broken lines, that is we have about eight pairs of a cer- 
tain shoe, and about ten or eleven pairs of another kind, 
and so on; and of course not all sizes. Inasmuch as 
there has been another advance in leather, we are going 
to sell these, and sell them at from 50c to $1.00 less 
than their regular prices. 

Here are a few Examples of the Big 

Savings You can Make: 

Men's Box Calf Lacs Show-Just pair in this lot, ft A a a 

will ho Hold at $2.49 

Men". Black Elk Plain Too Work Shoe*- #/> r»p 

Double soles, will be sold at ^Z.DsJ 

Men'» Gun Metal Button or Lace Dre»* Shoe*— fl» /> Mf\ 

Just 10 pair of each, will be sold at }a£.4»7 

Men'. Tan Elk 10-inch High Top Shoe*— with two full +*% Eft 
soles, wlllbesoldat «pJ.DU 

Boy*' Tan Elk Hide High Top Shoe.-made with #A AA 

oak soles, will be sold at ^/. *J Q 

Ladie'* Pattent Button Dre** Shoe*— made with d»0 4 A 

cloth top, will be sold at $Z.4" 

SPECIAL PRICES ON ALL 

RUBBERS, ARCTICS, FELT BOOTS, ETC. 

BUY NOW. 



» 



We are telling Men'* Heavy Fleeced Lined or Ribbed f>C-. 

Shirt* and Drawer* at DC 

Men'* Leather Palm Glove*; Special. 39,. 

Men'* Canvas Glove* ; Extra Special i0c 

Men'* Heavy Cotton Work Sox; Special 7l2*7~ 

Men'* Heavy Blue Work Shirt*; Special 75 c 

Men'* Blue Overall* ; Special, per pair $1.00 

Boy*' Cotton Sweater*; Special OTc 

B ° y *' C^ Sf V Mene'Heavy 

Corduroy S ^wll^^^i ^^-^ Worsted 

Pants r±y~ ^*rft$F&^ Sweaters 

98c ^-^ Erlanger, Ky %!.%% 



I ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦# 

• ♦ 

• GUNPOWDER. « 

• a 

Enoch Rouse is no >>etter 

For Sale— R I. R, rooster Miss) 
Eeatriee Aylor Both 'phones. 

Ernest Horton and wife havo a 
child very sick of pneumonia 

Mrs Lu^e Bradford had for 
her guest last week Miss Mamie 
Huff, of Big Bono. 

Mrs Alice Neal, of Chattanooga, 
is visiting friends here and in 
the Union neighborhood. 

Mm Grace Clore spent the 
week's end with her parents, Mr 
and Mrs P. P, Neal, near Grange 

XiiLIl. 

Clyde Clements, who loft some 
time ago for service in the army, 
wa< exempted and came home last 
week 

The- Purcell sale was attended 
by a good sized crowd and ev- 
erything sold for satisfactory 
priees 

" Tom Sommers from down on big 
Gunpowder, came from the city 
last Saturday, and was nearly 
frozen He got as far as Bert 
Clore's ^and stopped to warm, 
when he discovered his fingers, 
ears and nose were frozen He 
put up for the night and went 
home Sunday morning. 

The blizzard last Saturday was 
a recor d breaker on our 'ridge 
It began SnUWIng Friday after- 
noon and Saturday morning we 
had about six inches of snow 
and » heavy gale from the west, 
with the thermometers register- 
ing any where from 16 to 20 be- 
low zero Roads were badly block- 
ed again, and it was necessary to 
shovel snow Sunday morning, so 
Dr Sen our could visit his patients. 

At a meeting of the congrega- 
tion of Hopeful church oh the 7th 
inst, the. following officers were 
elected: M P. Bartow, Elder; E. 
A Blankenbeker and Lloyd Ayior 
Deacons, and Robert Snyder trus 
tee As an appreciation of the 
legal work done for the congre- 
gation of Hopeful church, the 
firm of Riley & Riley, was ten- 
tiered a unanimous vote of 
thanks 



THURSDAY JANUARY 17th, ltlT, 



MAIN POINTS jeeeaf lfappeni» ss .| 



In Governor Stanley's Message 
To the General Assembly. 

In his message to the General 
Assembly today Governor Stanlev 
praises the work of the last Gen- 
eral Assembly and enumoratesthe 
laws that have been passed for 
the betterment of the state, dwell 
mg at length on the new tax 
system, which, he says, is more 
than meeting the expectations of 
its friends, 

It remains for the present as- 
sembly to complete the work al- 
ready begun, he says 

H ® appeals for a co-ordination 
of tho education system of the 
State, and reviews the progress 
already made especially in con- 
nection with the State University, 
where, he says, jealousies and dis- 
sension have been wiped out fol- 
lowing an investigation of condi T 
"ons there, Taking up the report 
01 the investigation commission, 
We urges the passage by the 
Legislature of reforms suggested 

Oto th ® matter of public roads 
the Governor asks legislation for 
the extension of highways an<i 

their maintenance in th* highest 

state 01 efficiency, and .urges 
amendments to the statutes so 



Robert Gaines made Monday's! 
trip with his wagon io collect 
cream in the Woolper territory 

Tho river at Constance has been 
in fine condition for skating, a 
large area being as smooth us] 

glass 

— ^ 

It has been ruled that there \ 
must be no increase in the retail ' 
price tof milk or cream without ! 
written consent of tho District 1 



Pood Administrator. 

Some of those who came to 
Burlington on horseback last Mon 
day had shovels strapped to their 
saddles with which io remove 
snow drifts they knew they would 
encounter 

For the year 1917 the Farmers 
Mutual Fire Insurance Co, of this 
county paid losses to the amount 
of $2,213 74. The total amount of 
money required to handle the com 
pany s business was $3,404 53. 

The weather boss is letting too 

many blizzards escape ~ at 

large in thur ^^.^ ,. ^.,_ 

ilucLshouid ubl. investigated. Let 

the legislature appoint a com- 



A released British prisoner re- 
cently returned from German? 
says that the hatred for Englana 
m (rermany is iast ameliorating, 
.;n<l m its place is coming acru- 
ade of hate against tho Unitea 
••' '8. This m.iv bs inte**nre?!)l 
as a formal recognition by the 
German government of tho power 
and importance of the Uniteo 
Mates as a beligerent. Germany 
knew in 1 .14 that it was Englar-f 
that blocked her pathway 
world dominion ; sh* knows in 1918 
that the action of the U.S. makes 
it impossible for Germany to con- 
quer, even with Russia eliminated 



QUIT KICKING AND BOOST. 

Ransom Ryle, who resides in the 
Beech Grove neighborhood, has 

$ft5F3£& " l "5 ™n y frtends 
m his affliction, which is there- 
suit of the recent verv cold 
weather It seems that one' of his 
great toes had frozen while he 
slept, and just as he awoke In 
the morning a rat that was hunt- 
ing a warm place jumped upon 
his bed, when, quite naturally, he 
kicked at it in a most vicious 
manner, his frozen toe striking the 
bed post breaking Uke a piece qf 
glass The disabled member is 

fmng Mr Ryle considerable pain. 
he cat escaped unhurt 



Fertilizer. 

II will have two carloads of DAYBREAK FER- 
TILIZER, pure animal matter fertilizer, in Erlan- 
ger, the last of January or the first of February: 
I will sell at the car or deliver it to your place. 

C. H. Y0UELL, . Limaburg, Ky. 



Flock masters are approaching 
a very interesting period and they 
should be prepared to give- 
their ewes the best of care from 
row until tho lambs are able to 
shift for themselves, as tho loss 
of a lamb or an ewe amounts to 
a neat little sum of money when 
prices for wool, mutton and lambs 
are soaring. -as at present Ewes 
kept warm and dry do not re- 
quire so much food to keep them 
m good condition and are more 

tl 1 '? nave good luck witn 
their lambs, consequently good, 

careful attention is economy ah 
along the line in the sheep in- 
dustry as in everything else Keep 
in close touch with ■ vour Hock 
for the next three 'months at 
least 



Mi 




I 



County News Items 



Interesting Pacts Gathered Doring the Week by Our 
Regular Correspondents. 



K, 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ CONSTANCE ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
• ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Frank Klassener has tonsilitia 

Eighteen below zero here last 
Friday night 

Mies Alva Garnett, who was very 
ill, has about recovered, 

Henry Peeno went thru an air 
hole in the ice, and was in the 
water up to his neck when Olliej 
Kotmyor threw him a rope and 
rescued him, 

Ernest Ellis, eight years of age, 
put 600 feet of three inch rope 
an his sled, hitched hia pony tto 
the sled_ andhauled the rope 
across the river. He rode on the 
•fad 




The citizens Bank, of Erlanger 
elected the following officers for 
the ensuing year: 

E H. Blankenbeker, President. 

T, J. Stevenson, 1st V-Presldenr, 

O M. Rogers, 2nd V-President 

C T. Davis, Cashier, 
Directors — 

E H. Blankenbeker, 

T, J. Stevenson, 

Q M. Rogers, 

H G. Buckner. 

R P. Rice, 

A G. Schwind, 

C H. Blankenbeker, 

J W. Scott, 

W P. Beemon, 

C E. Slater, ' 



.. ■-" »" lilt- Mlilltl'.eS JJO 

that the State may, without de- 
uy, secure -its- proportion of the 
federal road appropriation. Be 
asks the regulation of motor-driv 
en vehicles, and suggests an in- 
crease in the automobile license 

The message also comments at 
length on the condition of the 
penal and charitable institutions 
or the State and reviews the im- 
provements that have been made 
m.« r Gove I nor calls attention to 
the fact that notwithstanding the 
increase in the cost of living" the 
charitable and penal institutions 
of the State have been conducted 
at practically tho sam-j per capita, 
but says that this is no longer 
possible, and seeks an increase in 
the appropriations which it savs 
is necessary. 

Of the workmen's compensation 
department, the Gov. says that, 
with the exception of a $r,500 
appropriation ior organisation, 
this Apartment has been self-sus 
taming, and ho emphasizes the 
success that has attended the op- 
eration o? the new law. 

The Governor then reviews at 
length the operation of the new 
tax system, going into consider- 
able ; detail as to tho benefits, ami 
calling attention to the fact that 
no legitimate business, largo or 
small has been harassed or pen- 
alized, and that none has escap- 
ed its just share of the necessary 
burden of taxation 

As a result of the new Jaw, he 
says, the State's revenues have 
increased $2,343,000 net. And this 
he regards a conservative esti- 
mate In order, however, to irit 
crease the efficiency and facilitate 
the operation of the new system, 
certain changes and amendments 
u A he existing laws, suggested 
by the Tax Commission, are rec- 
ommended to the Legislature, 
with the earnest plea that they 
be passed 

The Gov suggests that, while 
the new tax system will provide 
sufficient revenue for the State's 
expenses and afford a balance for 
-the sinking fund a budget system 
should be adopted in order that 
the income may be economically 
and judiciously expended 

The message recommends pas- 
sage of a law giving soldiers 
away from their home a vote 



mittee lor that purpo s e at once. 

~A systematic study of plant dis 
ease in Kentucky is to be inaug- 
urated by the Department of Bo- 
tany of the University of Ken- 
tucky which will cooperate with 
tho Bureau of Plant Industry of 
tho United £tates Department oi 
Agriculture. 



Roosevelt's Political Future. 

The New York World publishes 
from its Washington correspond- 
ent an interesting story of the 
currents and cross-currents inside 
tho national Republican party 

Our Republican friends— those in 
terested primarily in national poi 
itics-are thinking, oi course, 
about 920 They care very little 



Jailer Fowler worked day anii v Dout 19J0 Tne y c& ^ very little 
night (to keep tho heating' plant ! , u 5. tho Congressional elections 
at the court house in a condition , thls yeur ' although they will 
that there should be no evil re- ' make a "ght this year What they 
suits from the excessively cold j ^! an } ■ t0 ao ** to elect a Preai- 
weather. He kept the offices in ? e n i. J ?, 192 ° and opinion seems to 
the building very comfortable the 1 ^.o^'ioed about the best way of 
coldest day j going about it 

— ; M , Perhaps the most interesting 

Every phase of the War Depart- fr^^mtudToT" UhSs, "fKi 
mont's preparations for b^ttre I g° re Sves ot 'mi tho ^ve return* 
S g , aiD ^ - 1 G t rm ? ly was outlined and. Id to the ^Republican oartv Th£ 
defended by Secretary Baker be- faction is saiT to ^ok P to Senate 
fore the Senate Military Commit- Johnson, -of Calffonuaf aether 
tee He answered those who have ! leader and to be bv no means m 
^^^.^P*^*"* during enthusiastic abott Mr ^ooTveU 



> rHH vw*v.ui. UUlUJg 

the committee's investigation with 
the assertion that no army asthut 
now under the American flag ever 
had been raised, equipped or train 
ed so quickly, and that never 
before had such provision -been 



as they were all thru the cam- 
paign of 1912, and in 1916, up to 
the time Mr. Roosevelt killed the 
Progressive party at one blow. 
Memories of the last namad evoet, 
,~no doubt, .contribute largely, but 



y I Progressive leaders in the West 

■ "do not appear to be in sympathy 

Chickens hatched early in the with M r - Roosevelt's policy ofcrit 
spring are large in the summer, ic ">«»g every step taken by the 
mature early in the fall, and lay j government in the prosecution of 
eggs in the winter They will sit the war against Germany" 
early the following spring, pro-] We believe that many people 
duce earlier chickens and the pro- aside from the Progressives of the 
tess will be repeated by the of f^ West dissent from the scolding 
spring tone that Mr. Roosevelt has as- 

But the chickens hatched late sumed Criticism is all right and 
in the spring .will not mature un difference of opinion is inevitable 
til late in the fall— so late that but Mr Roosevelt is not aiding in 
they will not lay in the winter, I the successful conduct of the war 
They will not sit until late in the , On the other hand he is doing 
following spring— and again the harm Mr. Roosevelt hopes to be 
process will be repeated | the Republican nominee for Presi- 

The jury finds the argument is dent in 1920, but it is not dear 
all in favor of early hatching— es that he is taking the best meth- 
pecially this year ' od to go about getting it 



♦ 



UNION. 



Lynn Wilson and family spent 
last Sunday at J S. Head's, 

Jas Bristow's son is able to be 
up after a spell of pneumonia, 

A lack of fuel has caused Miss 
Kunie Adams to.cloae her school 

Mra John Hsrndon, of Owenton, 
was here last week the guest of 
her parents 

Mra S. C, Hiek* is verv ill of 
erysipelas Mis* Cora Aylor is 
nursing her 

On account of the severe utith- 
er Rev, B. W, Wilson did not iu* 
his appointment here* 

Tho ladies' meeting last Wednes 
day for Red Cross work was at- 
tended by a largo number 

Mra Florence Brletow and al«> 
tar, Miss Marietta Uv*, «p*Ml \*M 
Thursday ^rlth fWetr aunt, Mrs 
Fannie W«uv<t, who has I. 
ill, but is now improving 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ a 

♦ FLORENCE. a 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• 

Mrs J. 0< Carpenter is sickv 

Will Aydelotte, Sr, has grippe. 

Mra Bradley Sayres was a guest 
at Ed Snyder's last week. 

Mra Mat Wilhoit fell one day 
last Week and was injured some- 
what 

Emil Schmidt and wife are en- 
tertaining a fine daughter at their 
home 

Mrs, Dell Brown, who has been 
quite sick for several days is im- 
proving.. 

The mercury registered 20 de» 

frees below zero here last Satur 
ay morning, 

Little Jessie Marion Lucas is re- 
covering from a severe attack of 
glandular fever. 

Mrs Henry Myers and daughter, 
Mra Tobe Boyce, wore guests ol 
Mrs Cabill, last Saturday. 

Bro R. H, Carter will preach 
for the Florence Christian church 
congregation next Sunday. 

Mesdames C A. Fulton, Sailie 
Fulton and Emily Samuel spent 
last Buiiday with Mra Albert Lu- 
cas 

The oldest citizens of the town 
claim lust Saturday was the most 
unpleasant day ever experienced 
here 

Tho many friends of Mrs E. K. 
Henfidon, of Covington, will be 
griaved to hear that she is dead 
Burial at Florence, 

Mra Castloman wishea the Re* 
eorder to state that the money 
whloh wee taken in by IhoCrea- 
oando CUU> at its entertainment 
given to raise money wkhwhtoh 

tO pay for on* «lr.>.>( Um t , |,uh 

I ovor to the "M 
council 



lh:» fuel question in Burlington 
is gradually approaching a "ser- 
ious situation, and it has requir- 
ed good management on the part 
of the local teamsters to main- 
tain the supply so far. The sup- 
ply on hand will not carry the 
town through many more weeks 
such as the last two, the like 
of which no one wants to ex- 
perience again this winter 

The R, D. carriers grow nervous 
as thoy see their mail accumulate 
day by day and are not able -to 
move any of it It will be impos 
mole for them to handle it all 
on the first trip when the roads 
get in condition for them to cov- 
er their routes again, but the 
patrons do not demand that they 
attempt the impossible Unclja 
Sam is their hard master 



On account of the depth of the 
snow, Harry Roberts, local line- 
man for the Consolidated Co, has 
not been able to get out of town 
for several days to look after 
the system which the storms 
haive impaired very slightly con- 
sidering everything 



Tho game of checkers has sup- 
erceded the box ball alley The 
trouble about the game is it is 
not a revenue getter for ■ the 
party who furnishes the fuel, light 
and room, 

There is considerable corn yet 
in the field in this county and 
many of the growers will get 
very busy gathering it so soon as 
the weather will permit 



; and asks for an appropriation for 
the State Council of National De- 
fense, 

Governor Stanley then asks that 
the resolution to submit a con- 
stitutional amendment for State- 
wide prohibition be speedily dis- 
posed of in order that the people 
of Kentucky may have the oppor- 
tunity to express their desires on 
tho question, and declares that 
the amendment must be a clear 
and candid provision, without am- 
biguity or equivocation 

He then calls attention to the 
fact that a proposed Federal 
amendmentp roviding for prohibi- 
tion will be submitted, and con- 
cludes with, an. appeal to the pa- 
triotism ;of the legislators, who 
are urged to stand by the govern- 
ment on its war policies, and to 
aid the country in every way pos- 
sible, without partisan feeling. 

TESTED STRENGTH OF ICE 

BY HEAVY LOADS 



The condition the county roads 
were found in Tuesday morning 
demonstrates what citizens along 
thf*m are imbued with a public 
spirit 



William Smith and Elbert ('lore, 
of Belleview, were the only two 
out of town business visitors iu 
Burlington latt Tuesday, 

If you want to purchase a school 
house you will find one advertis- 
ed for sale in this isaire of the 
Recorder. , 

Burlington merchants pronounc- 
«hI Tuesday tho dullest day In 

their experience 

tfeighboi hood oowespundimeo is 
M>o\v,<l under this week 

Nci 1 mgn ol 11 ureejn) 



There was no doubt about eith- 
er the thickness or the strength 
of the river ice here last Satur- 
day, That was demonstrated by 
the heavy loads that were hauled 
across it at various points 

More than one party crossed" in 
an automobile at this place, and a 
further test was imposed when P 
C Weldon had a aled load of 
flour hauled across The sled, 
flour, the team and the driver, 
all totaled a weight of 4,100 
pounds apd ■ following in their 
wake came a pony and a cart 
At no point, after the party had 
gotten well out from shore, was 
there any cracking of the ice, and 
it seemed as solid as though it 
had been frozen to the bottom 
Tho first of the week crossing 
was made with more risk, as the 
rise in the river threatened at 
several places to send the whole 
mass of ice afloat However, cross 
ings by tho mail carrier from 
here to Florence were made in 
the usual way both on Monday 
and Tuesday -Warsaw Independ- 
ent 



ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS 

BLOCKED AT ERLANGRR 

A telephone message from Andy 
Scheben, at Erlanger, Tuesday 
morning, said th«> snow had block 
ed all kinds of business there, and 
that theiv were two or three 
trains held up on tho ruilruNU 
tht»re 

-> ranch or the beautiful b.- 

» IIIUIK '("(IKUI 



W&* 



Economize Wisely 

-A Maxwell Car Will Help 

Waste b often committed when the in- 
tention is to economize. 

A Maxwell car, famous for its economy, 
will cost you only a few dollars a month to 
operate and maintain. 

Which is the real economy: 

(1) To use the car and 
save time, strength, and 
mental vigor? 

• (2) To do without the 
car, lose time in your busi- 
ness, lose the health gained 
from motoring, and worry 
yourself into flmees? 

Use of a Maxwell car will give you self 
confidence. 

Your neighbors and associates will get 
mental inspiration from you. 

As wave circles widen when a pebble hits 
the water, so will your good example bene- 
fit your entire community. 

Save— yes; but do it sensibly, and let the 
Maxwell help. 

Tmurint Car $745; Roadster $745; Coupe $1095 

Beriint $1095; Setlan with Iflre IVhteU $1195 

F. O. B. Detroit 



W. L. Kirkpatrick, Agt, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 

Phonr« - Consolidated and Farmers. 




r 



• 



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\ 






SDAY JANUARY 17th, 1917. 

I i ■ 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



Storm Rf aches the South. 

"Macon, <-a, January II.— A tor- 
nado followed by a torrential 



S 1 



«flu 8. 



FEEDS FOR THE 

FATTENING HOGS 



Th 



. I I'll' ffeOd 



for thr fatten- 



radn, swept down "on -Macon and mg ho^s trom now on is corn Thej 
Vicinity today, killing one man, | tanner Who liud a supply of soy j 
injuring' several otheis and dam- i heans or sweet potatoes or pea- 
aging property seriously in the J nuts to feed his ho^s in theijali 
city and at Camp Wheeler, near U;ls fortunate, out even this far- 
h&re n ,r needed to harden Ids hogs 

Air communication with "ihs camp! dfi on corn For th© fat hogs yet 
was cut ot; shortly after the . to be killed and for the ones f.o 
storm broke, but telephone com- ln ' fattened for slaughter any 
munieation re-established tonight, j timo this winter the farmer must, 
revealed the greatest damage] ' course, depend mainly upon 
dooo there was from the- rain, torn v 

Which had flooded many of the' This does not moan, however, 
hospital trnts, 16 of which were 'that even the iattening hog 
blown down, should eat nothing but corn It ia 

It was estimated that 150 pa- seldom that either the cheapest 
tients were in the tents, out J gain or the best quality of pork 
early reports from the camp said comes from a straight corn die*, 
none of the patients were injured To add some feed containing more 

The collapse of the coral of the protein to the ration will be a 
One Hundred and Twenty-second profitable thing for any hog feed 
Infantry caused the only death, er to do For the last fifteen to 
reported, that of Private Harris, twenty days of a hog's life cot- 
of Atlanta { tonseed meal may be fed with 

After the tornado passed over good results It should seldom 
the camp, it struck the city, ; be led for a longer period than 
wrecking the race track and base- three weeks at a time, and it 
ball grand stands at Central should not be fed in too Large 
City Park and demolishing a build quantities, One-half to onppouna 
ing in which wild animals belong- j per day per hog is as much as 
ing to a circus, were quartered, i it is safe to feed for any length 

Some of the beasts were crush- of time This quality is for a hog 
"«d"uuuer the debris while others Weighing 125 to 200 pounds Smal- 
eecaped but were captured hy ; l~r hogs should have proportion- 
show men A kangaroo, howeve r. ' atly les s In no case should oot 
still was at large tonight ; tonseed meal make more than 

The roofs of the Central of one-third of the grain ration and 
Georgia and Southern Railway usually not more than one-fourth 
Round Houses were blown off and It is an -especially valuable feed 



PRETTY SOFT FOR 
NTERNEO BOCHES 

umfort 
North Carolina Camps. 



SURE GERMANY IS WINNING 



Whether the Germans are better ted 
t^an they should be is a matter of 
■*e* point. A gaotft of a Hue hotel 
would be dissatisfied with the food 
the Untied States furnishes and expert 
chef.s from the hip liners prepare. <)u 
the other hand, there are many people 
( who would be pleased to get high goal- 

Pienty of Food dnti Comforts in ! Uy i 5 ?* 8 **?* mot twice a day, ns the 

Germans frequently tlo, with an abun- 
dance of v ege tabl es, coffee, rye bread, 
butter, tea and stewed fruit. Steak is 
not unknown, although stews and 
roasts are more common. 

Local sentiinent is somewhat stirred 
by the fact that the United States offi- 
cials do not enforce the meatless and 
wbeatless days which Mr. Hoover 
urges on Americans. Ami criticism is 
directed because all purchases of food 
and selection of the dally mentis are 
made by one of the Germans them- 
selves. People ask what motive a Ger- 
man would have to conserve food for 
his country's enemies. This agent Is 
D. Peinert, former purchasing agent In 



UNIFORM PIG CROP 

One of the First Considerations 

in Selecting Original 

Herd. 



CONFORMATION OF GOOD SOW 



Detained Officers and Seamen of Ger- 
man Merchant Ships Often Have 
Meat Twice a Day— No Alien Has to 
Work Unless He Pleases, and Then 
He Is Paid — Find Variety of Ways of 
Entertaining Themselves. 



When night fulls on the camps at 
Hot Springs, K. C, near Asheviile, . 

where 517 olllcers and 1.004 seamen of Now York for the Hamburg-American 
German merchant ships are detained lme * 



by the United Stutes immigrant serv- 
ice, hooded iucandescents strung on 
the topmost strand of formidable 
barbed wire fences throw their fun- 
nels of light inside the barricade, the 



several stores in the wholesale for hogs that need to be "harden- 
district also were damaged | ed off" Cheaper pork and bet- 

Railroad traf fie was impaired ter pork will be made by feeding 
and wire communication without- somo cottonseed meal along with 
aide points virtually was paralyz- the corn to the hogs that are 
„ed tonight j being finished. 

_,. , . ~ .... I Tankage also may profitably be 

V* ashangton, Jan 11.- All thru fed to fattening hogs, as well as 
the South the camps have been . to breeding stock and growing 
beeet for the last few days by a ; pigs > It should be fed in the 
severe «torm In Memnhis today ; proportioh of one part to ten of 
the temperature was at zero, in j corn when these two feeds make 
Oklahoma it was 6 nelow, and in ' up the ration It can safely be 
the northern part of Texas, at Ft fed in a self-feeder, as the hogs 
Worth and Dallas, it was six tie- 'will not eat more than is good 
grees above^ j for them Even at present very 

« j high ^prices, it will pav to bal- 

Bdieves In Obeying Orders. j ™J° U P an otherwise all-corn ra 

M* ?f at t U hf a i^ W i hC H B r? j P Ue ^ ^ho farmer who has skimmilk 

l« iJi k / af L b ^? r 2 to feed his fattening hogs along 

,?£„ £? t ."- P f ctins to ^ ca, £ dl with corn can make pork at a 

SS^H^oit^T ^ ny ? n ^ Wlth £ u >w cost All the corn he will 

£■«£ ? n ~£i °^L J Gr ^ n ' Wh °r eat and all the milk he will drink 

««, If m «„r n £ rth ? rn i ClUze ? of is a good formula for the ■ hog 

S? nffi~ e t«' * ken , tucI 5 y ' ?» tered ;that.fs being fattened. 

his office in search of assistance „, . . . 

It was the last day allowed Mr Sho f rt \ b .™ n >. so y beons-almost 
r,mr>n in wMni, t^ ,v^«,^ ».; ' any feed rich in protein may b*» 



Green in which to ' prepare "his ' ?°7 . 

queetlonaire and he walked from fe<i to e P? fattening hog to bal- 

thome in North Bend, a dis- anc ,? U J> ^9 corn, and a profit 
oe of eight miles, facing the valued on the combination Neith 
.d that almost burnt hUs flesh,, er of ^ e9 f * hre * r .{ e t d8 > . howev - 
whlle (he climbed wire fences er ' ca . n ,. ^ fed profitably in large 
to avoid the snow drirts that he quantities, and more than a small 
encountered in the road At Bui- Proportion of soy bcans-possib y 
littflville he was joined by Allie f^, to six or eight 'of corn-would 
Winston, who shared the discom- ' !^„ uk _ el y to af.fect the quality of 
fort of the trip with him. Mr. 



tho meat 



Green thought Uncle Sam would I Th& fattening hog should be 
handle him roughly if he should *<** a, l that he will eat, and the 
be a few minutes late in making more he can be persuaded to eat, 
up his questionable, and he made tho better. Tliis is another ad- 
the trip to Burlington notwith- vantage of a mixed diet But he 
standing it was entirely too bad should not be fed more than he 
for a person to be out, Heevi- W *N oat Many farmers lose money 
dently believes in obeving orders ' right here. A hog can fatten 

—, j himself in a cornfield and do it 

L. p. Beemon, tho Recorder's economically He gets sufficient 
Limaburg friend of manv years exercise there to keep his ap- 
atanding, spent a short "time at P otlte active If the corn is dump 
the office last Monday He was f 6 ove * the f ence to him in a big 
looking fine, said he had plenty £ ea P' h ,* ^^ not eat as much as 
of good provision, an abundance.il yould H properly fed He at 
^>f splendid fuel, ate with a rel- 
ish, slept splendidly and had 
nothing to do during the cold 



weather but keep comfortable and 
enjoy life What more should a 
person want? 



The last issues ox the Carroltton 
Democrat and News devoted most 
of their space to the publication 
of tho lisis of claims paid out of 
the general expense road funds 
of Carroll county. Carroll is not a 
very large county buc from the 
list of claims the papers carriea 
she spends considerable money in 
the course of a year. 



most certainly will not if the 
corn is trampled into the mud 
or the awill poured into a filthy 
trough Peed on a clean floor or 
in clean trough, and when any 
quantity of feed is left clean it 
up and let the pigs develop an 
appetite before giving them any 
more It will pay over letting said he, "What!" and looked again et 



high perched sentry boxes. Lights slm» 
ilurly spring up Id the rooms of the 
four-story hotel, where the captains, 
mates and engineers of the big liners 
are quartered. No sound- comes from 
these Teutonic cantonments — they give 
no more sign of life than Belgian vil- 
lages left in the wake of German 
armies. 

On the tracks barely outside the bar- 
ricade trains begin to pas-s with silence- 
shattering roars, great trains of 60 and 
70 cars drawn by giant moguls with 
naming furnace doors — the aristocrats 
of freights for whom all slgna] lights 
show clear as they spi>ed eastward to 
the Chesapeake ports with cargoes of 
grain, horses, lumber und machinery. 
Those within the wire know what that 
rnihtug eastward portends. 

Sura Germany la Winning. 
But no other uiesrsage do they be- 
lieve, or, If they do, they conceal belief. 
They read American newspapers, but 
tell the guards Germany Ik winning the 
war and that It will be over In four 
months. They sny the Americans have 
never repaired the ship engines their 
now interned crews disabled because it 
cannot he done iii this country. Offi- 
cers of the great ship Vuterland say 
she has never left lloboken docks. 

Differences between officers and men 
have sprung up and fears of forcible 
encounters made it necessary to estab- 
lish separate camps. The men when 
they realised that they were freed 
from enforced obedience to their offi- 
cers began to show increasing evidence 
of resentment for past strict disci- 
pline. The officers were enraged at 
this inoculation with American ideas. 
Some of their men eveu showed friend- 
liness for the Americans! 

But talk does not lessen the vigi- 
lance of the fifty-two Amerlcau guards 
working in three shifts. 'They are 
Germans," said a hatchet-faced guard 
with his hand on his holster. . He look- 
ed up at the nearby forested cliffs 
where the French Brdhd river emerges 
with crashing waters Into the broad- 
ened camp valley. "And some day 
the casualty lists will show of the boys 
from this stato killed in France. And 
then—" 

Concealments on Those Cliffs. 
"Then what?" he was asked. "TOT." 



Officials in charge of the camp de 
fend Peincrt's selection on the ground 
lhat he is highly capable. They say 
that for 'miuwa the per capita cost 
of raw food has been only 45 cents a 



gua i d bei ng s tat ion e d I n darkened (,ay ' and In sist tha t the hogs fed on 

t h e gu rt wgu a re~sipreaTnig complaints 



of short rations. They have no orders 
from Washington to enforce the Hoo- 
ver regulations, they add. 



IMPORTS UNAFFECTED 

BY U-BOAT WARFARE 



Weather conditions got just 
right for another snow last Mon- 
day afternoon and the beautiful 
eame down rapidly for several 
hours, iand by Tuesday morning 
another big snow had fallen, 
and ranged in depth from VI to 1ft 
inches There were then three anci 
a half snows on tho ground 



them root and wallow about ov- 
er a lot of feed half | buried in 
the mud, The easiest way of feed- 
ing is seldom the rrrost profitable, 
although if one self-Jeoder is fill 
ed with corn and another with 
tankage the hogs will balance 
their ration better than 
feeder can do it But the feed 



must he kept clean In any case, 
the hog should have all he wants 
to drink 

—Southern Agriculturist; 



In Danger of Colapse. 



Amsterdam, Jan 10. — Germany 

| was never in such danger of col- 

j lapse from internal and external 

rs - 1 difficulties as at present, says the 



A small child of Mr and 
Ernest Horton, of Hopeful neigh- jc^Vr^ondent in Germany ^f ' the 



borhood, died oi pneumonia Mon 'hid in i 

SSdSfwc^ tne ea^ "fi^l^ 'S&S^J^ «tru«- 
ironfth^ rpJw.r .< , . 1 'oaOlgle concentrated around FOred|n 
Snllt ° Ut -, to l ie , iiur ! S*CK»tary von Kuehlmann has 
be*cleared o ? sm « f^n" Kld to been refleeted in violent scenes 
mow drifts By the in the Main Committee of the 
, Reichstag Public action of the 
Socialist 



reighbors 



minority cannot longer 
Thy East Bend and belleview ! ,J1 * resisted, and even should mil- 
trucks have not passed through I itarism gain a (temporary vic- 
Burlington for several days, audit tory tho correspondent thinks re 
is opined that supplies For peo- acti °n will follow quickly 
pie and livestock are getting! Russia's example is said ^> have 
scarce in these quarters, ab there already infected popular and mil- 
has been no chance for them to itary circles 

BtrSSoif f ° r 8aVe by Way ul rhe • fo - d »*-**>«■ Mttonaj 
Burlingt on mourning the dislocation of indus 

, r . _ , ^ ', l T. th:» growing desire for peace 

Master Robert Maurer, son of and fear of a now offensive on 

Circuit Clark Charles Maurer, has the West, threatened to lead to a 

been very sick for over three tiulic phaso ii the negotiations 

weeks Professional nurse O. O, at Brest-Litovsk fail, and In that 

Dixon has been in attendance all case a domestic explosion is in- 

tha time i<»vi table 

Geo E. McGlasson, of Bullitts-j 
ville neighborhood, has been very A stronger Market. 

Ul of pneumonia for more than a The reports of the loose haf 
week Ho is reported some bet- tobacco pales the latter part of 
ter but yet a very sick man, . last week showed a stronger mar 

■ ! ket in every instance, and the 

— P. Phlpps and Gen, lily • n ' bt, 3 r * r8 w ' ro vt ' r >' murh enconr- 

wore busy with their sno'w plow a s* ed thereby ns the threatened 



Tuesday opening roads Two hor- Hmm P in prices was disappearing 

set were attached to the plow ana ft was agreed by all (he large- 

it dtd excellent work buyers that prices would get 

l ^ m Udtor as the condition of the 

,],.-„,, Tniin „,i ,.ir ... • . tobacco improved and the woath- 

tiTInii i 1 i er ^comes mom favorable 

-S S^fL. i Kriday, whe.vth.-y hfllldUj , g lt There Is a 

fi to L^rV." 1 W ""' "In »"*• uniount. of exceedingly 

M«el«t aHlSLJIn^ ""' UnU ' tobVco in tile WUfltS ami the 
Monday afternoon . „, t(> ))iit f |l m((| . thM , oop „ 

■■ " soon jts po#i^ibirt ha* bad j bad 

» " 3 I' f/ect on the. mark but il 

II. L, 1 hi rteems I tearing now aodtbfl 

(ul churt'h (outlook |g ■, ,«ry niurh Iroproi 

I 



1 1 1 l s 



the concealments of the cliffs overlook 
ing the camp. 

The officers have the advantage of 
the men in the matter of quurters 
though the food is practically the 
same. The four-story hotel was leased 
tho •'>' the government with its equipment 
of private baths, steam heat and fine 
furniture and surroundings of tenuis 
cpurts, croquet grounds und big pool 
of naturally hot water. The men are 
housed In eight one-story wooden bar- 
racks built for their use. each barrack 
20 by 168 feet in size, with double- 
decked bunks, heated by stoves und 
served by a detached shower bath 
house 1 4 by 50 feet, In the-rear ef each 
barrack. 

German artisans did all the work of 
construction, being paid by the United 
Htates at the rate of $20 u month. No 
alien there has to work unless he wish- 
es, and If he does he is paid. One day 
all of them quit work because they 
resented the publication In a local 
newspaper that they were slow work- 
ers and had to be told how to do ev- 
erything. 

The Germans find a variety of ways 
of entertaining themselves. Some play 
tennis, others croquet, some howl, some 
go through a soniimilllary drill, and 
each camp has its team for phiylng 
what the guards call football. The 
ball is like irfootball, but it is not 
kicked. It Is batted with the hand. 
For the men, the international Y. at 
C. A. has established a clubhouse 
equipped with tables, reading matter, 
games and a moving picture outfit. An 
American secretary Is in charge. 
Work for Idle Hands. 

The officers have nearly completed 
a miniature German village by the riv- 
erside. Tlie "houses"- are tiny affairs 
scarcely large enough fo let a conic 
of their burly builders squeeze iu, and 
much ingenuity and artistic dt-slKii is 
shown in their rustic fashioning. Tree 
limbs, brolcPn brick, stones, old carpet, 
flattened tin enns, all picked up in the 
hoh-I grounds, are the material used. 
The United States furnished nothing. 
Commodore Ruser, chief of the Vuter- 
land, built one Of these tiny houses alld 
is very proud of th* lllllo hrlck Move 

which beats ii. When a/orkli 

t licit- hotW'H the 

Kin d tin ir orttftfitdom und upex I 

kindly, ntlinple men. Th« etuuuioti 

nn i in building s altallsr viiht,**. 



for 

very 



Figures for Ten-Montrf Period 

Show Only Slight 

Falling Off. 

How little the submarine warfare 
has curtailed the exports from London 
to the United States since Amerlca^de- 
elared war on Germany is seen In the 
official figures of the United States Im- 
ports from the British capital. The 
figures for ten months ending with Oc- 
tober show a decrease of only $18,000,- 
000. with a total of ?nr>,3y0,471. Last 
year the figures for the similar period 
were $133,740,788. 

— The principal articles imported from 
London and their value were : Rubber, 
$31,610,629; precious stones, $15,609,- 
408 ; tin, $8,852,836. 

The principal articles imported from 
London for the ten months this year 
were: Rubber. $39,770,603; precious 
stones, $15,435,592; tin, $9,390,001; art, 
$4,464,560; hides, $2,934,872; furs, $5,- 
434,870; tea, $747,058; Indigo $1,197,- 
101 ; wool, $929,047. 

There is a slight Increase in the 
Imports of tin as compared with Inst 
year's figures, a decrease of about 
$3,000,000 in art imports; the figure for 
hides Is about half what it was, and 
less wool was sent here from London 
by approximately $500,000. Indigo also 
shows a decrease amounting to more 
than $1,000,000. Tea shows the most 
notable falling off, the figures being $4,- 
436,508 for the 1016 period and $747,- 
058 for 1917. There was no tea or 
wsol Imported from London last 
month. 



Many Judges -of Swine Regard Good 
Roomy Females as Being Especial- 
ly High In Fecundity— Male 
la Half the Herd. 

(Prepared by the ITnited States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 
In feeding hogs for the market, as 
also with any other class of meat ani- 
mals, larger returns are obtained when 
the stock Is as nearly uniform as pos- 
sible, and as lt is very profitable for 
each farmer to breed his own feeders, 
particular attention should be given 
to the selection of the original breed- 
ing stock. Uniformity is of primary 
importance, /"*• to have a uniform 
crop of pigs there must be uniformity 

must be one of the first considerations 
In selecting the original herd. 
Tho Sows. 
The females of the herd may be ob- 
tained by purchasing bred sows or 
gilts safely In pig to a boar of rec- 
ognized worth. As It Is often difficult 
to obtain a sow which has shown her- 
self to be a good breeder by the previ- 
ous litters she has produced, It is ad- 
visable for economy's sake to purchase 
bred gilts. These should be about 
twelve months old, being bred after 
the age of eight months, and If possi- 
ble tfll should be in pig to the same 
boar. Here is the first opportunity to 
practice selection for uniformity; 
whether—pure-bred «r not, the sows 
should be similar in color, marking, 
type and conformation. The type of, 
the sows selected should be the one 
which -the market' demands. While 
there Is some variation between the 
different breeds, it Is hugely a matter 
of characteristics, as a good Individual, 
no matter what breed lt represents, if 
properly fed and managed will make 
economical gains. 

conformation. 
In conformation a brood sow should 
show first of all femininity. This Is 
well marked In the hog if a close ob- 
servation is made, and is characterised 
by quality and refinement in all parts 
of the body. The bristles are finer and 
less erect than those of the boar, giv- 
ing the sow a smoother appearance. 
The forehead Is smoother, the neck 
much thinner, and a little longer in 
proportion to the rest of the body. The 



Bible combination*. In other words, a 
toe mat not produce offspring slmllari 
In type to herself, unless her aneeetam } 
were of the snme type. By selecting j 
the sows from one lienl, It Is not only 
possible to choose animals similar in 
visible typo, but ttrey are apt to no 
similar lu dormant characteristics as 
well. In buying such animals the farm- 
er Is not purchasing separate Individu- 
als to form so many breeding units, 
but rather kindred individuals, an 
parts of a single established line or 
type which will blend together to form 
a single breeding tanlt. ' 

At best, it is impossible to choose 
sows that will produce true to type, 
for as yet no line of breeding Is abso- 
lutely pure, but by selecting the sows 
in this manner, the chances for uni- 
formity are Immeasurably Increased. 
Some mistakes are bound to be made, 
and their correction will be difficult, 
but by keeping records of the breeding 
stock and their produce, it will be pos- 
sible to dispose of undesirable individ- 
uals as their poor reproductive abil- 
ity becomes known. < One ideal most 
always be uppermost In the breeder's 
mind, and the stock must constantly 
approach nearer to that one Ideal la 
order to make «u»y real progress. It is 
relatively easy to produce hogs, but to 
prouuea u ni f o r m h og s, hogs that will 
Build up and advance the breed, ^er- 
quires time and constant effort. 
The Boar. 

The farmer who lives In a communi- 
ty where it Is possible to obtain the 
services of a good boar, and who has, 
only a few sows, will not find lt prof- 
itable to keep a male simply for use in 
bis own herd. However, if he has atx 
or more sows, or if it is Impossible to 
get the use of bis neighbor's boar when 
necessary, lt will be well to purchase 
one of his own. It is often desirable 
to delay the purchase of the boar until 
some time after the original female 
stock has been selected. If the gilts 
were bred at the time of their pur- 
chase, the service of *■ boar will not be 
needed until several months later, 
when it is necessary to breed for the 
second lot of pigs. Tali is not only a 
Saving of money, at the time of start's 
Ing the herd, when expenses are apt to 
be very heavy, but it also gives the 
breeder time to study the original sows 
along with their offspring and select a 
boar that will correct their faults. 

There is a hackneyed but neverthe- 
less true expression that th« 
half the herd." He really does repre- 
sent 50 per cent of the breeding stock, 
and therefore Is the most Important 
individual In the whole herd, bob 
granting that he forms half, the sow* 
most certainly constitute the othek; 
half, even though their influence la. di- 
vided into several parts. Certainty} 
both halves are equally Important and! 
neither can well be neglected at J&£ 
expense of the other. 



shoulders nre not as heavy, although | It la well to select a boar at 1 



oooocxxxxxxxxxxooocxxxxxxo 
LIFE LINES USEFUL 

IN ROUGH WEATHER 




-''■" 



»** 



ft*?S&& 



BOAR 1$ MOST IMPORTANT INDIVIDUAL IN HERD. 



;t 



When seas are rough and wave after 
wave breaks over their ship the snll- 
ors on Uncle Sam's destroyers find 
these life lines-.mlghty handy in get- 
ting about on the sea-swept decks. De- 
stroyers' decks are low and the boats 
cut tiirough the waters with great 
speed, so that often the entire ship is 
awash. Though the sea was not es- 
pecially rough when this photo was 
made, the life lines were rigged up 
aud the Jackie, wus clothed in readi- 
ness for rough wenther. 



Picking Apples on Shares. 
Picking apples on shares Is .the way 
one Knusas university fraternity is 
lighting the high coal of living aud at 
the Miime time storing up a wiuter sup- 
ply of fruit. Que farmer bargained 
with the Acncln Chapter to pick his 
apples. The fns«sniliy men pitted 200 
btndielH Kiif woffling ».n sttnres, storing 
twenty bushels in ilu-lr iiui.init.v 
house aw psyuitml. This 
last lid (lullts, no they hi id u 

Quilting i muuv thirty unllts. 



.they most not be narrow, for such a 
condition Is an indication of lack of 
constitution. By no means accept any 
breeding animal that is narrow-chest- 
ed, for lt is a sure indication of lack 
of vitality and consequently of breed- 
ing ability. Ample capacity in the 
| middle should be provided by well- 
sprung ribs, and long, deep sides. 
;Many judges of hogs regard good 
roomy sows as belnff especially high In 
[fecundity, and this characteristic is 
certainly no detriment to their confor- 
mation, provided lt Is combined with 
quality. 

A sow should show the type demand- 
ed lu a market animal, namely, a 
strong, vilde, deeply fleshed back; 
smoothly covered shoulders; plump, 
well-rounded hums: and a trim, neat 
underline. A wide, well-developed pel- 
vic cavity will Insure easy parturition, 
and the udder should be evenly and 
well developed and have at least 12 
teats. Her legs should be strong and 
well placed, have good clean bone, and 
strong, straight pasterns. It Is not of 
ns great importance to have perfect 
feet and legs in a sow as in a male, 
but she should show -no weakness at 
this point. A sow should have scale 
and size, combined with quality. 
Strong, dean, lvard bone, trim joints, 
neat ears, fine, glossy bristles, and 
freedom from folds nud wrinkles In the 
skin, are all indications of quality. A 
large, raw-boned sow, having ^plenty of 
capacity and size, but lacklug In fem- 
ininity and quality, is one of. the poor- 
est Investments a breeder can make, 
for her pigs will be slow to flevefop, 
hard to fatten, and lacking both in 
numbers and" in uniformity. " — 

Selection. 

If possible, Hie first purchase of sows 
should be made from one herd, for In 
this manner it is easier to get uni- 
formity. Uniformity goes deeper thou 
the mere visible typo or conforma- 
tion; lt is determined by past ancestry 
und In controlled by the din ruder) -dies 
touUlmid In the k> nnpluMii Hi.- 
>!,uu|ilii.iiii i„ com intious, sxleodlUg 
from iiiiIIvIiIiimI to Individ 

iber of tl 
Me COafortUAttfJU onl| | the pos- 



elght months old, for the select 
8 weanling pig that will mature 
the kind of breeding animal , 
in any particular case A a very' 
cult and precarious undertaking. 
selecting the male, aim to 
faults which may be present, 
conformation of the sows. These : 
may be discovered In the 
months between the first 
the bred gilts and the time 
necessary to breed again for 
ond litter. It Is seen here wl 
formity is of such importance 
herd, for the common fault of i 
may be corrected in the of 
the use of a boar particularly] 
in that characteristic ; but if 
are not uniform — If, foaexa 
has high quality with^lack 
while another has the op 
acters — it will be Impossible 
one boar that can correct" 



of 



by 



?, one 
scale, 
char-' 
select 

faults 

of Moth. 

The bonr must . show maicullaltyi 
first of all. This is chaftieteflzed by 
a strong head, a thick- wet-crested 
neck, well-developed shoulders, stiff 
bristles, and a little coarser pair thai* 
Is found In a sow of the satne weight 
and age. Ffi.s visible roprodoicttve o*« 
gaus should be well developed. Bj t 
nonneans select a hoar bavlnjg only one 
testicle, or one having j rwoj [small, ill- 
defined ones. Constitution /should he 
strongly in evidence, for thw Indicate* 
the vitality necessary to get strong, 
healthy pigs. The market' type lndfr- 
catcd for the sows should he found In 
the boar, namely, a long, «lrong» well- 
arched buck, thickly covered with flesh 
—not fat ; a well-rounded, plump ham^ 
a deep, smooth side; and a trim under- 
line. He must have quality, but with; 
i{ strength of bone and seals. A hmalT, 
over-reflned boar is often lacking In 
masculinity. Strength of \mn» Is shown 
In the development of the feet .add 
legs, and the manner in whlch'tbs ani- 
mal carries himself upon his toee< An 
Ihe hind pasterns nre very prone fe 
become weult with age and may inter? 

■ertonsly with scrvi. 
Irct a young boar, one tluu 
Up en Ida toes, T M\ uc 

I only i 
•I length and quality of bona. 



A*-.^™. 



riMssaani 





1 



4 



Vol. XXXXIII 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 

1 "" * ■'■■■■ ! -' ■ - ' '■ , " ., r ' ' ■'——■■■ ■■ » — ».—...-. . ,,, ■■ , i ■ ■ — .. i- n ...... ■ ., ,,,,. , , . , . „ . , , , . n j ■ . . , _ _. ,..., .. _ . . . . 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1918. 



$1.50 Per Year 



No 17 



SOLDIER'S REST HOUR. 
Providing generously for the physl-; 
cat well-being of his boys In khaki, 
Uncle Sam does not stop there. He 
throws open in all the camps whole- 
Rome recreations for the soldiers' play- 
hour, baseball, tennis and water 
Bports; at the same time he does all 
that any government can do to protect 
the army community from the inroads 
of vice. In a number of cantonments 
the Y. M. C. A. will have as many as 
seven buildings, offering amusement 
and instruction and giving facilities 
for study and writing. The American 
Library association Is preparing to in- 
stall suitable libraries and ifft ' 
services of trained librarians ^eeture 
and study courses will be arranged to 
imeet the wants of young men who may 
have been taken from their studies to 
ibe made Into soldiers, says American 
■Review of Reviews. Altogether, the 
soldier's mental and moral betterment 
(Will be more effectively and systemati- 
cally promoted than has ever before 
been possible in the massing of so great 
an army. 



Of 



JUDGE E. S. CLARK 

Bracken County Strongly 
Endorsed for Governor. 



Tour full measure of worth will nev- 
ter be reached. It's your business to 
!keep moving forward. When you keep 
;every day's business within the limit 
'of the day, you are master of time and 
work. Allow trifles to consume the 
hours and you will soon be wrestling 
iwlth accumulations that clog. Keep 
(ahead of your tasks and you rob them 
'of their lrksomeness. You make the 
jwork of tomorrow easy by doing your 
best today. And as you do your best 
,'the measure of tomorrow never comes. 

Slonr final effort is Just ahead. Work 
or It 



— A m e ri can s wh o se fuel supply la lax 

should take a leaf from the experi- 
ence of their English cousins, who 
! dwell for the most part In houses with- 
out furnaces and trust in small fires 
and to good circulation gained by exer- 
cise to keep them warm In winter. 
Those who exercise most will feel the 
cold least this year. 



Even the torrid weather cannot 
abate the enthusiasm nor check the ac- 
tivity of the army of woman workers 
(who have volunturlly enlisted to aid 
Ithe government in its campaign for 
the prevention of waste, and who, so 
■long as there Is an ounce of perish- 
able food in sight will preserve and 
jpickle and dry. 



Among the ingenious brutalities of 

Germany is the Invention of a high 

I explosive that resembles coal and can- 

^oot be identified when mixed v#th coal 

^v shipping purposes. The more we 

Irearn of German Ingenuity the more 

|lt Is to be regretted that it is not di- 

] jrected In decent uplifting paths. 






There can be no higher tribute to 
the patriotism of our farmers than 
the statement that they have increased 
their acreages from 10 to 50 per cent 
since the opening of the war and that 
thousands of them have gone broke 
fighting the battle of liberty in the 
furrows. 






s 



A British expert says that the Unit- 
ed States will be the deciding factor 
In the air in defeating Germany. It 
has been a favorite American maxim 
that there is always room at the top, 
and here is a brilliant chance to prove 
it 



The theory that England and France 
I lured Uncle Sam into the war with 
the Intention of hanging back and let- 
ting him do the fighting is not getting 
much support from people who are 
keeping track of General Hulg. 



I That British officer who climbed 
over the top and shouted out to Ger- 
man snipers what he thought of them 
for firing on the Red Cross flag prob- 
ably got more satisfaction out of it 
than had he killed them. 



^ Opinion In Berlin is being revised 
about that contemptible little British 
army. It Is now being looked on. If 
not officially, yet positively, with con- 
siderable wholesome, not to say chas- 
tened respect. 



The Lokal Anxelger of Berlin states 
that the war has exi>osed In its naked- 
ness much that la low and contempt- 
ible. And the Berlin pui^r certainly 
should be familiar with such things. 



(Braoen Chronicle.) 
Next year— 1919— the Democrats 
of Kentucky will be called upon 
to select a candidate for Gov- 
ernor, one that the Democrats of 
the entire State can unite onf, to 
have any hopes of winning. We 
do not believe that there iB a 
member of the party in the State 
but that will agree that it will 
require a united party and a 
strong man at the ncaa of the 
ticket to win. 

There is no denying the fact that 
at *he pre.y.-<nt time- there ia a 
tgc — * *-al <** diaaatfsf action over 
the State with the wew tax laws 
and othe r measures pa s sed by the 



The Leader of the Allies. 



last legislature, approved by the 
present Administration, all of 
which has caused our Republican 
friends great joy, and as may be 
imagined they are making the 
most of • it in a political way. 

The next Democratic candidate 
for Governor of Kentucky, to win, 
must be a man upon whom both 
the wet and dry wln;js of the<par-t 
ty can unite on. The candidates for 
the other Stat© offices must be 
strong men, from different sec- 
tions of the Gommon wealth. Ken 
tucky Democracy must stand to- 
gether as a single ~^an; 

How. are we going to.be able 
to achieve the dedircd result of 
a united party? The answer is 
simple enough. Pick a leader 
who has no connection with any 
click or faction— one With, no ax 
to grind, one having the confi- 
dence of tho people, on?>who has 
proven himself to be a friend of 
the people in the past, one who 
could accept the highest office 
within the gift of the people 
of the State, and enter upon its 
duties with clean hands— with no 
enemies to punish or friends 
whom he would be compelled ' to 
reward to tho detriment of the 
affairs af tha Sfntn W] 1 ?n g ^ ap 
of this caliber fs selected we be- 
lieve that Kentucky will roll up 
its usual Democratic majority for 
the State ticket at the next 
election, notwithstanding the fact 
that Edwin P. Morrow, the ablest 
Republican in Kentucky will like- 
ly he the standard bearer of his 
party. 

If the Chronicle was asked to 
select the man who wilt fill th* 
above requirements, we would 
suggest E. S, Clarke. Appelate 
Judge from this district. Judge 
Clarke is a comparatively young 
man— about 45— is a native of Pal- 
mouth, a son of the late A. R, 
Clarke, who served as the State 
Senator from thin district. He 
.served as County Judge of Pend- 
leton county for several years, and 
was acting in this capacity when 
he was electeil without opposition 
to the Appellate bench, and since 
he has been in Frankfort has 
made a most excellent record as 
a jurist as a member of thehigh-rf 
est tribunal in the State. 

There is no better qualified man 
in Kentucky to serve the people 
of his State as Governor than 
Judge Clarke ; he is clean and , 
wholesome, wearinsr no man's col-j 
lar, and for every Democratic vots • 
his Republican opponent would ; 
be able to coax away from! him, ', 
Judge Clarke would land two Re-4 
publicans. 

The above cut is a fairly (good 
likeness of Judge Clarke. Look 
him over and see if "you do not 
agree with the -Chronicle that he 
is big enough to fill theCrOVM 
ernor's chair in the mpfw Capitol j 
at Frankfort. 



The evening Posy has/ always 
maintained that the proper place 
to judge an American public man 
was in America, but, in asmuch as 
so much was made between 1914 
and 1917 by the opponents of the 
President a bom; "what they" savin 
Europe aboiutthe President, it ia 
important that European opinion 
of the, President be fully under- 
stood. 

The recent address of the Pres- 
ident before Congress upon the sub 
ject of America's war aims has 
made an impression in Franco be- 
yond that of anyother address by 
any other Ameiican since this 
country was founded. The Petit 
Parisien says that address "is the 
tir-.est piece of political literature 
oi our times. It lays down the ba- 
sis upon which tho world, after be 
ing rid of the pe rpetual m enace of 
armed conflicts. may 1*5" 



FORTY YEARHOO TODAY 

Items Taken From the Issue of 
The Recorder of Janua- 
ry 24th, 1878 



Why not have the mail route 
aartended from Burlington to Bel- 
le view ? 



recon- 



Charles Conner, of Gunpowder, 
raised 10,700 pounds of tobacco on 
b'i acres of land. 

Corn thieves are using wagon* 
in Hebron neighborhood. 



ill 



John Uarperj *>* Hebron, Is very 



lose interested^ 



When a fair young widow begins to 
scout for No. i, she suspends further 
tender reference* to No. 1 until sf tet 
she has bagged her quarry. 



v 



Germuny hn« shut off sh.pro»nts of 
coSl to Holland him!, parmloilcul as It 
may essm, tUut mtlua has mads lis 
Hollanders hot. 



In your issue of the 10th inst 
I notice that some are urging a 
state dog law, something that 
seems very unlikely we will ever 
get to be effective in Kentucky 
for the reason that many of our 
county representatives are indif- 
ferent to the real needs of an 
adequate law, and the mountain 
fellows are always readv to fight 
In defense of this VALUABLE an- 
imal, the worthless dog. My sug- 
gestion is that we all pull togeth- 
er for a national dog law, carry 
a $2 tax on males' and $20 on 
female dogs with a jail sentence; 
attached for any person caught 
with a female dog in their pos- 
session without having paid the 
license, and I think our dog 
troubles would soon disappear. 
C. O HEMPFLING,. 

From "Somewhere in France" 

A few days sin re a card aa- 
dressed to Wallace Rice, ot which 
the following is a copy, was re- 
ceived at the Burlington postof- 
fico : 

December 26th, 1917. 
Somewhere in France. 

"Kind Friiendj:— Yesterday I re- 
ceived a Christmas package from 
the Red Cross. The tobacco kit 
containing this card was one of 
the several welcome gifts. I as- 
sure you that I greatly appre- 
ciate your kindness and wish to 
thank you for the same. Most of 
us fellows spent a rather unusual 
Christmas, tnis year and it was 
pretty nice to receive thi'so 
things from folks back' in the 
States. "Yours Truly, 

"ROBERT H. OAfrKH. 

7 Aero Squadron, 
A. li F I'l.nxv." 

Taking e Meatle Vaoation 

Th«> Hwllivlow timl i af P Sb ur g 
•ohtx>l* mv taking an enforced 

..( rm<sal«<l I hat \nv\ .11* , 
two low 



structcd^." 

Still more complimentary is the 
Paris Temps, Alter recalling the 
that it once alluded to Mr. Lloyd' 
George, whom it admires greatly, 
as the "Prime Minster of Eu-i 
rope," that journal teils us that be- 
him Llord G^eorLe in a stronger 
figure than his. The greatest na- 
tion now at war is directed by the 
first of living statesmen. At the 
council of the allies the President 
of the United States sits at the 
lead of the table*" 
..Other information from Paris 
shows that , this unbounded admir- 
ation - '-of. /'the American President/ 
is not confined to the French 
press. When the news reached tha 
French chamber oi Deputies that 
President Wilson was making a 
war speech before the American 
Congress, the members of that 
body remained in the hall until 
midnight to get the text of the 
address, and the building rang 
with cheers when it was read 
from the rostrum. Later it was 
decided to placard the address 
over France and to use airplanes, 
to drop copies printed in Ger- ] 
man within the fines of the enemy 
— In Italy - the reception wa s — the- 
same and the newspapers of Rome 
and Milan allude not only in 
glowing terms to the address, 
but, almost without exception, at* 
cept the verdict of the French 
press that the American Presi- 
dent is the strongest man in the 
camp of the allies. 

From Washington we read of 
the arrival at that capital of the j 
Duke of Devonshire, British Gov- | 
ernor of Canada, the head of- a ] 
great English family that has al- j 
ways been identified with Eng- • 
lish Liberalism. The. Duke-told tho J 
reporters, that, when h? read the | 
President's address in the Ot- 1 
tawa newspapers he determined i 
at once to come to Washington j 
to congratulate the President in j 
person upon "an historic docu^ 
ment that will stand out through 
all time." The Duke called at the 
White House and presumably told 
the_President what ho had * pre- 
viously said to the press. 

The comments of the British 
press were given fully immediate] 
ly after the text of the President's 
address reached that country. It 
Is 'noteworthy that every public- j 
meeting since reference has i 
been made to the address: — ana 
the references are, in almost ev- 
ery case, eulogistic. Not the i 
least prized by Americans of these j 
commendations will be that of j 
Viscount James Bryce. 

As . tim» passes ther? may be, 
there probably will be. some dis- 
sent among the now unbroken 
pean of praise, but of one fact 
there can be no doubt, now ot in 
the future, the President of the 
United States is everywheife rec- 
ognized in Europe, by his en- 
emies and by his friends, as k 
man of commanding ability, en- 
dowed with unrivaled powers of 
expression, a will of iron and 
unsurpassed powers of leadership. 
Against such a verdict the malig- 
nant outpourings of Mr. Roosevelt 
will beat in vain.— Louisville Ev- 
ening Post. 



reques 

per school house on 



the 30th inst 



W. N Smith, for Assessor, L H, 
Dills, for County Clerk and Asa 
S. Cason, for Constable are an- 
nounced this week. 



The Ocean's Greedy Maw. 

It is estimated that more than 
one billion eight hundred million 
dollars' worth of marine property 
lies at the. bottom of tho sea, 
most of it in the war area With- 
in the barnacled hulks are con- 
tained riches beyond the dreams 
of avarice) It is not strange there 
fore that all over the world, 
and especially in America and 
Great Britain, schemes are being 
studied for the future reclama- 
tion of much of this wealth, 

It is said that gold valupd'. fit 
ten million dollars was stored in 
a strong room on an upper deck 
of the Lusithnia> This snip lies 
in three hundred feet of water 
rot many miles off the 'coast of 
Ireland^ Twelve and a half ■ mil- 
lion dollars are reported to have 
gone down on the Yasaka Mara in 
the Medit»— — ""■"wa **>a which 
mrfSnT 



BLOGGET GIVEN 20 YEARS 

Judge Wade Gives Lecture a*" 
He Sends Convicted Trai- 
tor to Prison. 



(Britt, Iowa, News.) 
"1 sentence you to twenty years 
in the federal penitentiaty at Lea 
venworth." • 

Amid a deathlike silence in the 
federal court room, Judge Martin 
J. Wade at 2:30 o'cloca Friday 
pronounced these words upon D. 
T. Blodgett, convicted of treason, 
The court room was packed. Doz- 
ens were turned away by the bail- 
iffs at the doors. 

"I could, under the law, serin 
tence you to sixty years in prf- 
son,'-' said thi* judge sternly. "Men 
Who opp ose the government |a_ 



tint proposed Woolper p ike are i a j*°, ^ "il?**^ U|> *° , mitlion a 9 l fJJUa-JxQOJLjrf the nation's—. agony_ i. ._ 
uested to meat at the Wool- lars' wOftT of jewels belonging to ought to be taken out against 



the* Maharajah of Kapurthala, ship 
pod on the Geelong, Hundreds of 
other ships carried money and 
valuables in varying amounts and 
many of these victims of the Hun 
lie in comparatively shallow wat- 
"eTj Our own shores are dotted 
with craft which went down dur- 
ing storms in tunes of peace* 

Scientific men, however, declare 
that wrecks lying even so near 
the surface as the Lusitania will 
baffle human skill In Honolulu 
harbor divers working on the ill- 
fated K-4 went down to 288 feetj, 
a world's record They used a 
special form of steel armor But 
at that depth, it is impossible, for 
human beings to jsrq§k,«eIxecUve- 
Vfi- Mo#t-ef- 

ward which radK is turning covet- 
ous eyes \\&..)M the openseai or in 
unprotjejWn roadsteads It woula 
.,»■ be nyfa to impossible to conduct 
ri? I sal/a£e operations under such con 
4pl6*tJ jfj, 



Soldiers' Pensions 

If a soldier pr sailor is killed, 
and he had a wife and children, 
the Government will provide com- 
pensation for the wife, so long 
as ehe remains unmarried, and 
support the children until they 
become 18 years of age. These pay 
ments range fVom $25 for a widow 
alone to $57.50 "tor a widow and 
four ichildren. if the man is to- 
tally disabled the Government will 
make a fixed monthlyVpayment to 
him ranging from $30 \montji; if 
he is married, to $75 apiwi',"^ if 
ho has a wife and three or . 

children. Should he be so helpless! Jfion* Here and there hardy 
as to require a nurse or attend- fivers using new appliances may 



ant he will be given up to $2C 
additional. Should he lose both 
feet, both hands, or both eyes, 
or be permanently bedridden, he 
will be paid $1Q0 a month wheth- 
er he is n bache l or o r m a r ri ad. 



Thrifty One-Arm Farmer. 

George Knorr, of near Gardners- 
ville, has the use of onLyonefarm, 
but he does not fet that handi- 
cap him in his farm workv In 

1916 he raised 4.000 pounds of to- 
bacco on 2^ acres of land', and in 

1917 he raised 3,500 pounds oantwo 
acres; He can plow, hoe and strip 
tobacco and does all kinds of farm 
work with one hand, Mr. Knorr hf 
an old railroad man and came to 
Pendleton county three years ago, 
having worked on the C & O. R. 
R, for years. He is married and 

Jiis wife and daughter constitutes 
his family, He is an all round 
good fellow, and we wish him 
continued success out in the tall 
and uncut If Mr. Knorr hadb^en 
raised on the farm, and had the) 
use of both arms, he would be 
one of those horny-handed fef 
lows that you read about in the 
old blue book,— Falmouth Outlook. 



In Old Kaintueky and 

In New Kaintueky. 

The Kentucky Legislature has 
voted for the constitutional amend 
ment that would create a dry 
nation The home of Bourbon is 
thus placed among the first of 
the necessary Ithirty-six States 
which would say that man's lips 
shall not partake of beer in Mil- 
waukee, shall not drink a cock- 
tail in New York, or become dis- 
cursive over* a highball in Louis- 
ville We can almost see the 
moribund spirit of Bourbon rise 
with accusing finger and utter 
"ET tu, Kentucky ' ? 

Ponder how Kentucky must 
have changed that an almost un- 
animous votr> to create a dry na- 
tion (should have been cast in its 
Legislature There "was a time 
when Kentucky was proud „oi its 
whisky It mentioned the quality 
of its Bourbon as it praised the 
beauty of its women and the ped- 
igrees of its horses Under inspir- 
ational conditions, Its politicians 
became statesmen and its civilians 
were mettamorphosed into col- 
onels Its government was unre-- 
generate Democracy tempered by 
assassination But it had its 
great men, its Clays, its Breck- 
iiiri.dg.of, its Lindsays, its Wat- 
tersona And above all it stood 
out as the representative of tha 
colonial customs and manners of 
Virginia, westward carrying the 
ompire of their charm, 

It was not a moral Kentucky, 
perhaps, in a Puritanical sense 
Perhaps it was not an efficient 
Kentucky as efficienty is under 
ffljoiod in thjese days of intenn 
sive industrial demands. It may 
not have been a sociological Ken 
tucky according to the standards 
that have arisen in our contem— 
orary community life. But it was 
an attractive Kentucky, a roman- 
tic Kentucky. Somehow the blue 
grass was bluer in those days 
and a Kentucky beauty had a 
regal individuality and an inher- 
ent charm that made her an ex- 
otic in other climes. The men of 
Kentucky were gentlemen of ad- 
venture, modern cavaliers who 
could appreciate beauty, weave an 
anecdote and discourse upon the 
Almanac Ootha of thorough- 
breds. They may have been 
colonels by convivial brevet, but 
they wore their honorary titles 
with grace and distinction. 

It may be that It is a more 
moral, a more efficient, a more 
sociological Kentucky which has 
voted to join the caravan of 
thirty-six States which would lead 
a ^nation across the desert sands 
of prohibition. But let us thank 
the gods for having had old Ken- 
tucky !— Cincinnati Times-Star. 



reclaim from Neptune some of 
his loot But most of these ships 
and most of their riches for ever 
have disappeared from the sight 
of man, 



Master Root. Maarer Improvin g 

Robert, little son of Mr. and Mrs 
ChaTles Maurer, Wai oporateu on 
last Friday evening by ; Dr. Langs- 
dale, of Cincinnati, to relieve him 
of an abscess that hud formed on 
one of his lungs as a result of 
the pneumonia from which the 
little fellow had suffer*^ eonaluV 
t-rably. The operation was sue- 
o-ssful and afforded tho patient 
lonaiuersble relief, and he h.ii im 
urovad ...iih< in tho paat I'** 

duy» \ mi* Sellout DOWSl tTOU 

eondi- 
>< for I uh 

uil to b» < f >«.» | . 



Conserving Fuel 

Dr. E, W, Duncan, local Fuel Ad- 
ministrator, had no trouble what- 
ever enforcing Mr. Garfield's br- 
der for certain industries and bus- 
iness houses to uss no fuel last 
Monday. The local stores closed 
th«ir doors at noon, whieh. was 
somewhat of an inconvenience to 
quite a number of persons who 
came In from tho country to do 
some trading, they not knowing 
of the order that had bean la- 
sued In regard to conservation of 
fuel on Monday. The same order 
of things will prevail each Mon- 
day to and including the 35th of 
March. 

\\ i k at tha tbftrjntim.- 



Management. 



Not all human problems are mor 
al problems. 

A big percentage ot the difficul- 
ties of h umani ty are to be solved 
only through good management. 

In the present world crisis man- 
agement is perhaps as important 
a factor as morality. 

There are situations and lileds 
of effort whero we know concrete- 
ly what is right and wron^r— where 
men are unanimous in their decis- 
ions as to what is right and 
wrong— and yet there is no conv. 
prehension in these particular sit- 
uation^ inn the way to achieve 
what is right. 

One nation, for instance, ia long 
on morality and short on technic. 

Another is long on technic and 
short on morals of any kind; 

Nations have their times of soul 
triah just as have individuals. 

The individual prays that he may 
live a weiL-reunded life with re- 
alized ethics that keep his heart 
dean - without leaving him devoid 
of a technic ot management suf- 
ficient to enable him to meet the 
bread and butter problem, 

Natio ns should raise a similar 
prayer with all possible fervor— 
meanwhile work like the dicit- 
ens to make the prayer come true 
—Chicago News. 

Passed by Big Majority. 

The Woman's Suffrage joint res- 
olution, passed the House in Con- 
gress, by a vote of 274 to 136,104 
Democrats, 166 Republicans, 3 So-, 
cialists, 1 Progressive and 1 Pro- 
hibitionist voting for the reso- 
lution, while 102 Democrats, 33 
Republicans and. one Progressive 
voted against it. All of Kentucky's 
members of the House except 
Helm, Kincheloe, Rouse and Shir- 
ley voted for the resolution. The 
very close vote in the house was 
a surprise to the advocates of the 
resolution. No action wijl prob- 
ably be taken in the Senate un- 
til the suffragists believe they 
have the votes with which to 
put it through. March 19th,. 1914, 
the Senate defeated a similar res 
olution by a vote of 35 to 34, 26 
Senators not voting. There are 
now twelve suffrage states with 
an vlectoral vote of 193. New 
York is the latest recruit to tjie 
suffrage column. 



Plenty of Grain in the U. S. 

Chicago, i Jan 18.— -Representa- 
tives from grain exchanges all ov 
er the country declared at a con- 
vention of the National Council of 
Grain Exchanges, that there is 
plenty of grain to supply the needs 
of the United States and the Al- 
lies during 1918, but H is up to 
the Government to move It from 
the farms to the centers of dis- 
tribution. Corn and wheat crops 
last year, delegates stated, ex- 
ceeded all expectations They said 
that an even greater yield was 
expected this year v Conditions for 
winter wheat were, said to l>e 
baiter than at any time during the 
last ten years 



ought to be taken out against 
a stone wall and shot. But the 
law is not vindictive. I fix your 
bond at $25,000." 

"The spirit of this nation,'-' con- 
tinued Judge Wade, "is kindness, 
tolerance and generosity. This na- 
tion is willing to fight the en- 
emy on the front; she is willing 
to fight the assassins of the sir,' 
the pirates of the seas andX the 
masters of the most brutal cruel- 
ty that the world has ever 
known— she is willing to figh.. 
all of these, but she will not 
consent to be stabbed in . the 
back, and traitors most sheath 
their kniveB or submit to exter* 
mination." 

Tho entire court room was vis* 
by -t he s e word* ana 
^ater several women wept openly, 
whan tho judge said : 

"Fithors and mothers are send- 
ing forth their boys to yield their 
lives, if 'necessary, in the cauftts 
of human liberty. Men and women 
are giving their hard earnings to 
support these boys and "to make 
them effective in this war. Little 
children are giving their pennies. 

"Isn't it too "bod in this na- 
tion's hour of trial that a few, 
thank God, -only-. a-Jew_JEho__ara 



ea m 
atyotP*VM 



plee*- 






tl.i 
t 



no4 

ry abo| 



... 



fin 

1 



Stood \ Well 

Livestock 
u inter (vmarki 
the owners he«. 
to protect w 

mer In thkacv, l 

Kve hi*, (ontiti 
>n dnus maklni: 

OXP5b|> IlKlilUM of 

Sd flail <>'* «» i*"" 0* I 
YtasU. Mtat mn bs reptn 
ami other prutelu !•>< 
Mrvtnl lu very souill porUo 
voi ing for od i liy 

luoatleaa iui*nu» ihli auUf 
American Creels end wfr, 
a bread Sold fur u»t/ 



has stood the severe 

k»bfy well, owing to 

better prepared 

early every lar- 

1» prepared 

liable pro 

it>eeth'»r 

■t 




rebels against authority, who are 
traitors to their counlfcy— eeek to 
neutralize the sacrificiy^ •< 
neighbors." 

**I have looked Into your 
cord, Mr. Blodgett, I find that yott*"*" 
have always manifested supreme 
contempt for instruments of your 
government. You have defied the 
courts. You have reviled and a bus 
ed some of the ablest judges that 
ever sat upon the bench rn lows. 
You have libelled and maligned}' 
some of the most glorous patriots 
of our great commonwealth. 
. "You have attempted to have 
judges arrestee! and prosecuted be 
cause they disagreed with you 
about your rights. You have 
brought suits for gross amounts 
against jurists because they have 
faithfully performed their dttfy." 

"You h*» ve served time in the' 
penitentiary. It was a lesson which. 
you would not heed. You have»- 
refused bv your own acts to con- 
form to the rules of society. 'Yotf 
have no business at large un' " 
you learn that this nation can 
be compelled to submit to insu 
and infamy." 

Judge Wade paid but little 
tention to the prisoner's 
thalhe^was _a_rav|ng. ma 
the time the seditious pampJ 
were written. 

"You have manifested an un- 
usual shrewdness for an insane' 
person in the courtroom. If your 
ii. sanity is spasmodic you aho.ulOL 
be placed where you should have 
proper care and attention. Bat as 
a matter of fact you put up this 
plea of insanity, qoiy when you 
are hard pressed and need a 
loophole. There is no loophole 
this, tune." 

■■■ 

Brought a Serious Conditi o *. 

Ship losses and crop faft* . 
abroad have brought about such 
serious food situation In the 
countries that the United States 
planning to release for ex; 
additional ninety .million 
of wheat, although the country* 
export surplus had been shipped 
by the middle of last December, 
The American people will be 
ed by the Food Administration 
cut their consumption to 
up the amount to be exported. 
And unless they do it is claimed 
that the nation Is threat 
with a flour shortage in May 
fore the new wheat crop la ha 
vested in June. The Pood A" 
istration is preparing a law 
enforce wheatless days. 



I 




No Likes Florida 

Renewing his subscription tothd 
Recorder W. T. Davis writes from 
Riverview, Florida: 

"We are living in our own home 
on the farm, and I am WellaaJ- 
isfied with ,F loritla to ma Ke m y 
future homo. We. have a beautiful 
home on the Alify river, 13 miAes 
south of Tampa and one and a 
half miles from tho bay." 



Thought Grant a Dry County 

During one of the recent aero 
IH-riod*, Al Diddle, who lives two 
miles south of town, killed a 
large blarksnake In some fodder. 
Contrary k to most snake storlea 
p was not crawling 
was frown perfectly 
County News 




ry 
his sn: i,( . 
arou* bsail 
gj-j* you suff 
4pprocl 
morns to 
wsil The 
men g'v 
credit 
health. 
pa. 



Sled Useful. 

who has no sled a 



'/under very grsat <Ue*4> 
t this winter, They ha* 

,, doily nacMMty tor 

1/ und t 

linger they 

guod odvaatl 



Tble T 



'iM:;«#'*a^^#^-K&%!K^^£«««Kjyk^^ 



\ 



THURSDAY JANUARY 17th, 191: 



BO QNE COUNTY RECORDER 



«•. 8. 



— 



FEEDS FOR THE 

FATTENING HOGS 

Tho staple feed i'or the fatten* 
ing hogs nam now" on is corn Ttie 
iihiim who had a supply of soy 
(©■veral others and dam- : b**»» orsttvet .potato** or pea- 
alffi? property seriously in Uu-JtmiH to feed lus ho-s ui the, J all 
3t7 and i\ Camp Wheeler, war »'»' fortunate, but even this far- 
uiy »uu .*>■ i I n <M . notMle< i lo harden lus hogs 

AU communication with thVcampj fti <»,. corn For th* fat hogs yet 
was cut off shortly alter the! to be killed a,.d for the ones Jto 
rtorm broke, but telephone com- be 'atUnexl for slaughter any 
munication n -established tonight, time this winter the farmer must, 
revealed the greatest damageN couree, depend mainly upon 



Storm Rtaches the South. 

r Macon, (la, January II.— A t"»i'- 
Bado. followed bv a toiieiuial 
rain, aw opt down on .Macon ami 
Ticinity todav, killing ono man 



done there was from the rain, 

which had flooded many of the 

hospital tents, l(i tsf which were 
blown down 

It was estimated that 150 pa- 
tients were In the tents, out 
early reports from the camp said 



corn *■ 

This does not mean, however, 
that even the fattening hog 
should eat nothing out corn It is 
seldom that either the. cheapest 
gain or the best quality of pork 
comes from a straight corn die*. 



none of the patients wore injured To add some feed containing more 

The collapse of the coral of the protein to the ration will be a 

One Hundred and Twenty-second profitable thing for any hog feed 

Infantry caused tho only death, er to do For the last fifteen to 

reported, that of Private Harris, ; twenty days of a hog'a life cot- 

of Atlanta j tonseed meal may be fed with 

After the tornado passed over good [results It should seldom 

the camp, ii. struck the city, > be fed for a longer period than 

wrecking the race track and base- three weeks at a time, and It 

ball grand stands at Central should not he fed in too Large 

City Park and demolishing a huild quantities. One-half to onj&pouna 

ing in which wild animals belong-, per day per hog is as much as 

ing to a circus, were quartered, i it is safe to feed for any length 

Some of the beasts Avere crush- of time This quality is for a hog 



PRETTY SOFT FOR 
NTERNEO EOCHES 



Plenty of Food and Cumforts in 
North Carolina Camps. 



SURE GERMAnY iS WINNING 



ed under the debris while others' v. elgh tag 125 to 200 pounds $ 
escaped hut were captured by j ler hogs should have proportion- 
ehow men A kangaroo, however, ' atly less In no case should cot 
•till was at large tonight ! tonseed meal make more than 

Tho roofs of the Central of one-third of the grain ration and 
Georgia and Southern Railway usually not mora than one-fourth 
Round Houses were blown off and It is an especially valuable feed 
several stores in the wholesale for hogs that need to be "hard en - 
district also were damaged jod off'' Cheaper pork and bet- 

Railroad traffic was impaired ter pork will be made by feeding 
and wire communication without- soma cottonseed meal along with 
side points virtually was paralyz- the corn to the hogs that are 
ed tonight j being finished, 

Tankage also may profitably be 

Washington, Jan 11.— All thru; fed to fattening hogs, as well as 

the South the camps have been j to breeding stock and growing 

beset for the last few days by a ; pigs > It should be fed in the 

severe atorm In Memphis today , proportion of one part to ten of 

the temperature was at zero, in ■ corn when these two feeds make 

Oklahoma it was 6 below, and in ' up tho ration. It can safely be 

the northern part of Texas, at Ft j fed in a self-feeder, as the hogs 

W or th -and Dallas, it was—six d e- ; wi ll- not catr more than is good 

grees above, • for them Even at present very 

— — I high ^prieesv it wHl pay- to bal- 

t» , • t ftL • *> j ! ance up an otherwise all-corn ra 

Brieves In Obeying Orders. jtion. 

Last Saturday when Benj Riley,! <pho farmer who has skimmilk 
clerk of the local draft board ' to £^4 his fattening hogs along 
was least expecting to he called I W ith corn can make pork at a 
upon to assist anyone with his i ow coa t All the corn he will 
questionable, John J Green, who' ca t and all the milk he will drink 
is the most northern citizen of jj, a good formula for the-'h'wr 
the State of Kentucky, entered: t h a t is being fattened, 
his office in search of assistance I Shorts y^^ soy beans-almost 
Itwas the last day allowed Mr ( f d rich in pro tein may be 

Green in which to prepar* his tc £-to~ihB 4«ttening-JiQg toJ>al- 
queBtlonaire and he walked from hia corn and a profit 

his,, home in North Bend, a dis- wa i ize( f on the combination Neith 

i* ft< f *.u f * ei 3 ht T'L 09 ' Jl cin & n t u er of these three feeds, howev- 
Hfand that almost burnt his flesh,, ^ fed pro f it ably in large 

while flic cUmbed wire fences u ' antities and m0 re than a small 
to avoid the snow drifts that he ^ >roportLon of soy )>eans-iK>ssibly 
encountered m the road At Bui- » / t fiix or ei? f lt of corn-would 
bttsville he was jo^ed by Alhe ufe , t ^ the uality nr 
Winston, who shared the discom- i !Z„~— ,„,i. 

fort of the trip with him Mr.|- ,1 , \. . m . „ u i,„ n i fl k* 
Green thought Wle Sam would I Th & fattening hog shoul be 
handle him roughly if he should ««» all tha, he will ea , a J j 
be a few minutes late in making F?ore he can be Pf»««JeJ to ~ 1 ' 
up his questionaire, and he made the better^Tlu^ifl : another ad- 
the trip to Burlington notwith- v « nl f? e ° l LTh ™ th.n Ee 
standing it was entirely too bad should- not be d more jh^kj 

for a person to be out, Heevi- ™®L£* Many / a £™ e ™° ?„n*n 
dently b elieves in obeyin g orders ■ ggJJ^J g A hog ^ fatten 

L..R Beemon, the Recorder V -ono^caU^ He ^etj sufficient 



Detained Officers and Seamen of Ger- 
man Merchant Ships sDften Have 
Meat Twice a Day— No Alien Has to 
Work Unless He Pleases, and Then 
He Is Paid— Find Vsriety of Wsys of 
Entertaining Themselves. 

When night falls on the camps at 
Hot Springs, K. C, near Asheville, 
where D17 officers and 1,004 seamen of 
German merchant ships are detained 
by the United Stutes immigrant serv- 
ice, hooded incandescent* strung on 
the topmost strand of formidable 
barbed wire fences throw their xun- 
uute o r light .inside tha bar r h - u dc; ttnr 
guard being stationed lu darkened, 
high perched sentry boxes. Lights .sim- 
ilarly spring up in the rooms of the 
four-story hotel, where the captains, 
mates and engineers of the big liners 
are quartered. No sound comes from 
these Teutonic oantonmeuts — they give 
no more sign of life than Belgian vil- 
lages left In the wake of German 
armies. 

On the tracks barely outside the bar- 
ricade trains begin to pass with silence- 
shattering roars, great trains of 80 and 
70 cars drawn by giant moguls with 
flaming furnace doors — the aristocrats 
of freights for whom all signal lights 
show clear as they speed eastward to 
the Chesapeake ports with cargoes of 
grain, horses, lumber and machinery. 
Those within the wire know what that 
rushing eastward portends. 

Sure Germany Is Winning. 

But no other message do they be- 
lieve, or, If they do. they conceal belief. 
They read American newspapers, but 
tell the guards Gernmuy is wlnuing the 
war and that it will be over in four 
months. They say the Americans have 
never repaired the ship engines their 
now Interned crews disabled because it 
cannot be done in this country, offi- 



cers of the great ship Taferlaud say 4W;" tin," $8,852,830 



ItandS- g spent a short timf a? I^ tite acti i' G If th f C ^" * dU £ P with his hand on his holster. He look- 
eiancun^, spent a snoic urae ai , .. fon _„ to himina bier , i ... .... ...'.., ...,-. 



the office last Monday He was 



meoiuceiasc aionoay ne was fc fc t t dS much a8 

lookuig fine, said he had plenty ^ O ai w ' ould u properly fed He al- 
of good provision an _abundance ° t certainl \ r ^ not if the 



of splendid fuel, ate with a rel- 
ish, slept splendidly and had 
nothing to do during the cold 
weather but keep comfortable and 
enjoy life What more should a 
person want? 



Tho last issues oi the C'urrollton 
Democrat and News devoted mosi 
of their space to the publication 
of the lisis of claims paid out of 
the general expense road funds 
of Carroll county. Carroll is not a 
very large county but from the 
list »f claims the papers carrieu 
she spends considerable money in 
the course of a year. 

Weather conditions got just 
right for another snow last Mon- 
day afternoon and the beautiful 
came down rapidly for several 
hours, and by Tuesday morning 
another big snow had fallen, 
and ranged in depth from 12 to 16 
inches There were then three ana j 
a half snows on tho ground, 



most certainly 

corn is trampled into the mud 
or the swill poured into a filthy 
trough Feed on a clean floor or 
in clean trough, and when any 
quantity of feed is left clean it 
up and let the pigs develop an | 
appetil e befor e git ing-t hom any 



she has never left Hoboken docks, 

Differences between officers and men 
have sprung up and fears of forcible 
encounters made it necessary to estab- 
lish separate camps. The men when 
they realised- that they were freed 
from enforced obedience to their off! 
cers began to show increasing evidence 
of resentment for past strict disci 
pline. The officers were enraged at 
this inoculation with American ideas 
Some of their men eveu showed friend 
llncss for the Americans ! 

But talk does uot lessen the vigi- 
lance of the ftfty-two Americau guards 
working iu three shifts. "They are 
Getmans," said a hatchet-faced guard 



ed up at the nearby forested cliffs 
where the French Broad river emerges 
with crashing waters into the broad- 
ened camp valley. "And some day 
the casualty lists will show of the boys 
from this state killed in trance. And 



Whether the Gennuns are better fed 
than they should Ik- is a matter of 
■ Jewpotnt A sceesl et a Hue hotel 
would be dissatisfied with the tooQ 
the United States luniishi's and expert 

chefs from the big liners prepare. Ou 
the other hand, there are many people 
who would be pleased to get high qual- 
ity western meat twice a day, as the 
Germans frequently do, with an abun- 
dance of vegetables, coffee, rye bread, 
butter, tea and stewed trull. Steak is 
not unknown, although stews and 
roasts are more common. 

Local sentitneut is somewhat stirred 
by the fact that the United Stales offi- 
cials do not enforce the meatless and 
wheatless days which Mr. Hoover 
urges on Americans. And criticism is 
directed because all purchases of food 
and selection of the dally menus are 
made by one of the Germans them- 
selves. People ask what motive a Ger- 
mau would have to conserve food for 
his country's enemies. This agent Is 
D. Pelnert, former purchasing agent in 
New York for the Hamburg-American 
line. 

Officials in charge of the camp de- 
fend Pelnert's selection on the ground 
that he Is highly capable. They say 
that for months the per capita cost 
oLxoxi food has been only 45 cents a 
day, and insist that the hogs fed on 
the garbage are squealing complaints 
of short rations. They have no orders 
from Washington to enforce the Hoo- 
ver regulations, they add. 



UNIFORM PI6 DROP 

One of the First Considerations 

in Selecting Original 

Herd. 



CONFORMATION OF GOOD SOW 



MOte combinations. 



la other words, a 



Many Judges -of Swine Regard Good 
Roomy Females as Being Especial- 
ly High In Fecundity— Male 
Is Half the Herd. 

(Prepared by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture.) 
In feeding hogs for the market, as 
also with any other class of meat ani- 
mals, larger returns are obtained when 
the stock is aa nearly uniform as pos- 
sible, and as It Is very profitable for 
each farmer to breed his own feeders, 
particular attention should be given 
to the selection of the original breed- 
ing stock. Uniformity is of primary 



not produce offspring Bhnstari 
IB type to herself, unless her*n«**tQM { 
were of the same type. By ■ dw ^ g ' 
the sows from one herd. It Is not only 
possible to choose nuiraals similar U» 
visible type, but tlrey are apt to Oe i 

similar Iu dormant characteristics as 
well. In buying such animals the farm- 
er 18 not purchasing pepafftte individu- 
als to form so many breeding unite, 
but rather kindred individual!, ail 
Darts of a single established line or 
type which will blend together to form 
a single breeding tonit. ' 

At best. It la imnosslhle to choose 
sows that will produce true to type, 
for as yet no line of breeding Is abso- 
lutely pure, but by selecting the sows 
in this manner, the chances for uni- 
formity are Immeasurably increased- 
Some mistakes are bound to be made, p* 
and their correction wBl be difficult, 
but by keeping reeorde of the breeding 
stock and their produce, it will be pos- 
sible to dispose of undesirable Individ* 
uals as their poor reproductive abil- 
ity becomes known. One ideal must 
always be uppermost In the breeders 
mind, and the stock must constantly 
approach nearer to that one Ideal in 
order to make any real progress. 



IMPORTS UNAFFECTED 
BY U-BOAT WARFARE 



Figures for Ten-Month* Period 

Show Only Slight 

Falling Off. 

JHaw "n'* th - submarine warfare 
has curtailed the exports from London 
to the United States since America de- 
clared war on Germany is seen in the 
official figures of the United States Im- 
ports from the British capital. The 
figures for ten months ending with Oc- 
tober show a decrease of only $18,000.- 
000. with a total of $11B,890,471. Last 
year the figures for the similar period 
were $133,740,783. 

The principal articles Imported from 
London and their value were : Rubber, 
$31,610,629; precious stones. $15,609,- 



The principal articles Imported from 
London for the ten months this year 
were: Rubber. $39,770,603; precious 
stones, $15,435,592; tin, $9,396,001; art, 
S4,484,560; hides, $2,934,372; furs, $5,- 
4S4.870; tea, $747,058; indigo $1,197,- 
101 ; wool, $929,047. 

There Is a slight Increase In the 
Imports of tin as compared with Inst 
year's figures, a decrease of about 
$3,000,00(Lln.art imports; the figure for 
hides is about half what It was, and 
less wool was sent here from London 
by approximately $500,000. Iudlgo also 
shows a decrease amounting to more 
than $1,000,000. Tea shows the most 
notable falling off. the figures beiug $4,- 
436,508 for the 191 C period and $7 47.- 
058 for 1917. There was no tea or 
waol Imported from London last 
month. 



Importance, for to have a uniform 

crop of pigs there «™<* *« uniformity | relatively easyJoroduce hoga, botw 
In the breeding herd, and to obtain this 
must be one of the first considerations 
In selecting the original herd. 
The Sows. 
The females of the herd may be ob- 
tained by purchasing bred sows or 
gilts safely In pig to a boar of rec- 
ognized worth. As it is often difficult 
to obtain a sow which has shown her- 
self to be a good breeder by the previ- 
ous litters she has produced, it Is ad- 
visable for economy's sake to purchase 
bred gilts. These)should be about 
twelve months old. being bred after 
the age of elgbt months, and If possi- 
ble all should be In pig to the same 
boar. Here is the first opportunity to 
practice selection for uniformity j 
whether purebred or not, the sows 



which *the market' demands. While 
there is some variation between the 
different breeds, it is largely a matter 
of characteristics, as a good Individual, 
no matter what breed It represents, if 
properly fed and managed will make 
economical gains. 

Conformation. 
In conformation a brood sow should 
shnw first of all femininity. This Is 



produce uniform hogs, hogs tnat wM 
build up and advance the breed, re- 
quires time and constant effort. 
The Boar. 
The farmer who lives in a commumV 
ty where it Is possible to obtain the 
services of a good boar, and who baa, 
only a few sows, will not find it prof- 
itable to keep a male simply for use la 
Ms own herd. However, if he has alx 
or more sows, or If It Is Impossible to 
get the use of his neighbor's boar when 
necessary, it will be well to purchase 
one of hla own. It is often deairable 
to delay the purchase of the boar imtir 
some time after the original female 
stock has been selected. H the gllta 
jvere bred at the time of jthelr par- 
chase, the service of arboar wmnorb*; 
needed until several months later. 



should be similar In color, marking, 

type and conformation. The type ot when it la necessary to breed f or »q 

the sows selected should be the one second lot of pigs. This is not <*£ • 



well marked In tho hog if a close ob- 
servation is made, and Is characterized 
by quality and refinement in all parts 
of the body. The bristles are finer and 
less erect than those of the boar, giv- 
ing the sow a smoother appearance. 
The forehead Is smoother, the neck 
much thinner, and a little longer In 
proportion to the rest of the body. The 
shoulders nre not as heavy, although 



Saving of money, at the time of starts 
Ing the herd, when expenses are apt to 
be very heavy, but It atoo grres the 
breeder time to study the original sow* 
along with their offspring and select ft 
boar that will correct their faults. 

There is a hackneyed bat neverthe- 
less true expression that the "male la 
half the herd." He really does rep*^ 
*pnt no par cent of the breeding aftxlC 
and therefore to the most important 
individual In the whole herd, bote 
granting that he forma half, the aoftfc 
most certainly constitute the othefc 
half, even though their influence la. di- 
vided Into several parts. OertsjBCfc 
both halves are eqnally important ao« 
neither can well be neglected at jBM| 
expense of the other. 

It la well to select a boar at 1< 



then- 



Concealments on Those Cliffs. 

"i"es," 



It will pay over letting I said he, "What?" and looked again at 



more 

them root and wallow About ov- 
er a lot of feed half i buried in 
the mud, The easiest way of feed- 
ing is eeWoiji the most profitable, 
although if ou9 self-tTeeder is fill 
ed with com and another with 
tankage the hogs will balance 
their ration better than tho 
feeder can do it But the feed 
muBt be kept clean In any case, 
the hog should have all he wants 
to drink 

—Southern Agriculturist; 



OOOCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCXX) 

LIFE LINES USEFUL 

IN ROUGH WEATHER 

e ooococ)c > cxxxxxxx x o ooooooo o 



In Danger of Colapse. 



Amsterdam, Jan 10. — Germany 

j was never in such danger of cof- 

■ I lapse from internal and external 

A amall chiLd of Mr and Mrs. ! difficulties aa at present, says the 
Ernest Horlon, of Hopeful neigh- j correspondent in Germany of the 
borhood, died oi pneumonia Mon I Tijd in an analysis of the exist- 
day night Before the undertaker ! ing situation Tho political strug- 
couid answer the call the road ' glo concentrated around Foreign 
from tho residence out to the Bur ; Secretary von Kuehlmann has 
lington and Florence pike had to i bocn reflected in violent scenes 
be cleared of snow drifts by th>> in the Main Committee of the 
neighbors , p.-ichstag Public action of the 
m ; Socialist minority cannot longer 

The East Bend and liellevicw ! Jj? i^a^ted, and even should mil- 
trucks have not p asaed through 1 4 urta B *. **** a *emporary vic- 
EurUngton for aev^ral days, and it tor / tho correspondent thinks re 
is opined that supplies loT peo- actlon wfll foUow <l uickl y 
pie and livestock are getting * Russia's example is said J-o have 
scarce in these quarters, ab there- already infected popular and mil- 
has been no chance for them to itary circles, 

be provided for save by way of The fo^d question, national 

Burlington mourning the dislocation of indus 

■ t.'y, the growing desire for peace 

Master Robert Maurer, sou of and fear of a new offensive on 
Circuit Clark Charles Maurer, has the West, threatened to lead to a 
been very sick for over three traflc phaso if the negotiations 
weeks Professional nurse O. O. at Brest-Litovsk fail, and in that 
Dixon has been ir. attendance all caae a domestic explosion is in 
tha time i evilablo. 



the concealments of the cliffs overlook- 
ing the camp. 

The officers have the .advantage of 
the men in the matter of quarters 
though the food is practically the 
same. The four-story hotel was leased 
by the government with its equipment 
of private baths, steam heat and fine 
furniture and surroundings of tennis 
courts, croquet grounds and big pool 
of naturally hot water. The men are 
housed In eight one-story wooden bar- 
racks built for their use, each barrack 
20 by 168 feet in size, with double- 
decked bunkb, heated by stoves and 
served by a detached shower bath 
house 14 by 50 feet, in the rear of each 
barrack. 

German artisans did all the work of 
construction, being paid by the United 
States at the rate of $20 a month. No 
alien there baa to work unless he wish- 
es, and if he does he is paid. One day 
all of them quit work becuuse they 
resented the publication In a local 
newspaper that they were slow work- 
ers and had to be told how to do ev- 
erything. 

The German* find a variety of ways 
of entertaining themselves. Some pluy 
tennis, others croquet, some bowl, some 
go through a semimilltary drill, and 
each camp has its team for playing 
what the guards call football. The 
ball is like o~football, but it Is not 
kicked, ft Is batted with the hand. 
For the mon, the International Y. M. 
C. A. has established a clubhouse 
equipped with tsibies, reading matter, 



MM 



> '• : 




lea 



■OAR 4* MOST IMPORTANT INDIVIDUAL IN HERO. 



ting about on the sea-swept decks. De- 
l games tuui a. moving picture outfit. An j stroyers' decks are low and the boats 



they must not be narrow, for such a 
condition Is an indication of lack of 
constitution. By no means accept any 
breeding animal that is narrow-chest- 
ed, for It to a sure indication of lack 
of vitality and consequently of breed- 
ing ability. Ample capacity in the 
middle should be provided by -well- 
sprung ribs, and long, deep sides. 
Many judges of hogs regard good 
roomy sows as being especially hlph In 
fecundity, and this characteristic is 
certainly no detriment to their confor- 
mation, provided It is combined with 
quality. 

A sow should show the type demand- 
ed in a market animal, namely, a 
strong, wide, deeply fleshed back; 
smoothly covered shoulders; plump, 
well-rounded hums: and a trim, neat 
underline. A wide, well-developed pel- 
vic cavity will insure easy parturition, 
and the udder should be evenly and 
well developed and have at least 12 
teats. Her legs should be strong and 
well placed, have good clean bone, and 
strong, straight pasterns* It is not of 



These: 



whe 



reral 



a 



eight months old, for the aelec 
a weanling pig that will mature 
the kind of breeding animal 
In any particular case fc a very 
cult and precarious undertaking, f Ini 
selecting the male, aim to correct/ any i 
faults which may be present 
conformation of the sows. 
may be discovered In the 
months between the first 
the bred gilts and the time 
necessary to breed again far t 
ond litter. It to seen. hew w! 
formity Is of such lmpex-tanee 
herd, for the common fault of tb 
may be corrected In the offspring by, 
the use of a boar particularly /strong. 
In that characteristic: but if thje eowa 
are not uniform — if, for. examr/le, on* 
has high quality wllh\lack or scale,, 
while another has the opposlne char- 
acters — It will be Impossible •«> select 
one boar that can correct," thp faults 
of both. 'l 

The hour must show masculinity 
first of all. This is characterized by- 
a strong head, a Uncle- well-creste* 



When sens are rough and wave after 
wave breaks over their ship the sail- 
ors on Uncle Sam's destroyers find 
these life lines mighty handy in get- 



Gco E McGlaason, of Bullitts- i A Slronger Market . 

vdle neighborhood, has been very.; ' , "„ , , 

Ul of pneumonia for more than a The reports of the loose leal 

week He is reported some l>et- tobacco hales the latter part of 

ter but yet a very sick man . l««t woek^abowed a stronger niar 

_ ! ket in every instance, and the 

,, .... is-". »■ . u ' buyers <WCre very much encour- 
P. Phipps and Geo. Bly'h tl . u J ,,.. v tU * .. 

busy with 

Tueaduy opening 



O 
ararc 



,-. riui#j« "iu ucu, o.j o -j th roby „ tho threatened 

^Z>en£z ?o.Vt2« 'ho, « lum P " ^ cm WftS ^appearing 

ly opening toads J wo nor- . ' „.«<,,] i, v ,.n t ne Wire- 

». were attached to the p.owaou J ■ W« "fg^ ^^woSS get 

t did excell ent work better as the condition of I he 

■"■' — tobacco lmpiinttl and the weath- 

Oarnett Tolin nwl wife wen! to or becomes more favorable for 

Cincinnati laal Friday, whore they handling it There is I very 

got wiuthcr bound and were- not | ur g© amount of exceedingly no it 

Able to get back homo until tobacco in t lie country and tin' 

n of fort ''» ; 

^ II JIB p 

l\ f* pound ihoiita effect on tho market, but L< 

11. L» Tan- heems to be Rearing uow and the 
pftful church y union lmpro< 



aloud 

For 

net 



American seeretary is in charge. 
Work for Idle Hands. 
The officers huve nearly completed 
a miniature Oertnan villngo by the riv- 
erside. The "houses" nre tThy affairs 
scarcely large enough to let a couple 
of their burly builders ■g .TOCan lu, and 
much Ingenuity and artistic design to 
shown In their rustic fashioning. Tree 
limbs, brokeW brick, stones, old carpet, 
flattened tin cans, all picked up in the 
botal grounds, ure Uie material used. 
The United Slates furnish, d nothiug. 
romuiodore Kuser, CjHff of the Vnt.r- 
land, built one of these Hay bousea and 
In very proud of the little brick atavi 
which boats it. When working ou 
their poihH'M I he ofileeiH wvui |o Imve 
shed tt«. it- ..in. -ini. i.. 1. 1 ...Mi appeal aa 
kindly, simple men. 
in. i ... building a Mnili.it \ Hi i. 



cut thrftugh the waters with great 
speed, so that often the entire ship 18 
awash. Though the sea was not es- 
pecially rough when this photo was 
made, the life lines were rigged up 
and the Jackie wus clothed In readi- 
ness for rough wenthcr. 



as great importance to have perfect I nock - well-developed should^*, at**.. 
feet and less in a sow as in a male, j bristles, and a little coarser hair than 
but she should show -no weakuess at | »» '<> una In a *° w <* the sa»*e weight 
this point. A sow should hnve-scnle I nnd «W- ™» vlrible reproductive or- 

1 gaus should be well developed. By 



Picking Apples on Shares. 
Picking apples on shares Is the way 
6ne Kansas university fraternity Is 
lighting the high, coat of li\tng and at 
the Kitine Hum- storing up a winter sup- 
ply of fruit. One flintier bargained 
with (lie Aeneln i'lmptcr to pli-k his 
npplcN. The rmturuliy men pitted WO 

bushels one mor n in g on share*, storing 
twenty unth e to in their fraternity 
novas us i his 

last year it. 'i. .1 .pint*, so tfei 
Quilling l" t- mid made thirty qullla, 



and size, combined with quality. 
Strong, clean, hard bone, trim Joints. 
neat ears, fine, glossy bristles, and 
freedom from folds and wrinkles In the 
skin, are all Indications of quality. A 
large, raw-boned sow, having ^plenty of 
capacity and size, but lacking in fem- 
ininity and quality, Is one of the poor- 
est Investments a breeder can make, 
for her pigs will be slow to develop, 
hard to fatten, and lacking both in 
numbers and In uniformity. 

Selection. 

If possible, the first purchase of sows 
should be made from one herd, for lu 
this manner It is easier to get uni- 
formity. Uniformity goes deeper than 
the mere vlnlblo type or confonau- 
llinii It is determined by past unrexlry 
und Is controlled by the charucterl 
contained In the grrmpUam. Tbs 
geriuplaiui In coullnuoua, exteudlng 
from individual to 1 mil vUlnu 1, anil any 
member of th. ihuln Shows lu III vl»l 
Me conformation only a few ef the uos- 



no-ineans neleet. a boar hayiak only-OBS- 
testlcle, or one having .t^ofsmnll. Ill- 
defined ones. G'onsUtution I should be 
strongly in evidence, for thw Indicates 
the vltullty necessary to,, get strong, 
healthy pigs. The market' type ind*" 
cu ted for the sows should be found In 
the boar, namely, a long, Htrong, weH- 
arcbed back, thickly covered with flesh 
— not fat ; a well-rounded, plump ham; 
a deep, smooth side; and a trim under- 
line. He must have quality, but With 
\j strength of bone and scale. A nmali, 
over-refined boar to often lacking In 
masculinity. Strength of b»ae la shoem 
In the development of the feet SOd 
legs, and the manner In which the ani- 
mal carries hlmftelf upon his toee, Aa 
the hind pasterns nre Very prone {0 
become weak with ilfijtlifid Stay latarr 
fere seriously with hci-m. • ui.illt*, aa> 

leel n young I 

up en III 

f.aiiiil only In ..no hdvtitg 

si length and qunllty of bone. 



"5W 



li 



i 



f 



Vol. XXXXIII 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



i 



I 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1918. 



$1.50 Per Year 



No 17 



^V*« 



80LDIER-S REST HOUR. 
Providing generously for the physl-; 
col well-being of his boys In khaki, 
.Uncle Sam does not stop there. He 
throws open in all the camps whole- 
some recreations for the soldiers' play- 
hoar, baseball, tennis and water 
sports; at the same time he does all 
that any government can do to protect 
the army community from the inroads 
of vice. In a number of cantonments 
the Y. M. C. A. will have as many as 
seven buildings, offering" amusement 
and instruction and giving facilities 
for study and writing. The American 
Library association Is preparing to In- 
stall suitable libraries and give the 
services of trained librarians. Lecture 
and study courses will be arranged to 
.meet the wants of young men who may 
have been taken from their studies to 
be made into soldiers, suys American 
Review of Reviews. Altogether, the 
soldier's mental and moral betterment 
(Will be more effectively and systemati- 
cally promoted than has ever before 
been possible in the mussing of so great 
an army. ■ 



& 



*.* 



Your full measure of worth will nev- 
ler be reached. It's your business to 
keep moving forward. When you keep 
every day's business within the limit 
>of the day, you are master of time and 
work. Allow trifles to consume the 
hours a nd y o u wi ll soon be wrestling 
:wlth accumulations that clog. Keep 
iahead of your tasks and you rob them 
*>f their lrksomeness. You make the 
{work of tomorrow easy by doing your 
jbest today. And as you do your best 
ithe measure of tomorrow never comes. 

Stour final effort Is Just ahead. Work 
or It 



Americans whose fuel supply Is low 
should take a leaf from the experi- 
en c e o f th e ir Eugllsh cousins, — whxr 
l dwell for the most part in houses wlth- 
;ont furnaces and trust in small fires 
and to good circulation gained by cxer- 
|Cisa to keep them warm In winter. 
Those who exercise most will feel the 
cold least this year. 



Even the torrid weather cannot 
abate the enthusiasm nor check the ac- 
tivity of the army of woman workers 
(who have voluntarily enlisted to aid 
Ithe government in Its campaign for 
the prevention of waste, and who, so 
jlong as there Is an ounce of perish- 
able food in sight will preserve and 
[pickle and dry. 



Among the ingenious brutalities of 
I Germany is the Invention of a high 
I explosive that resembles coal and can- 
^oot be identified when mixed ^Itb coal 
^kr shipping purposes. The more we 
jrearn of German ingenuity the more 
'It is to be regretted that it is not di- 
rected In decent uplifting paths . 



,~ There can be no higher tribute to 
the patriotism of our farmers than 
| the statement that they have Increased 
thel r acreages from 10 to ou per cent 
since the opening of the war and that 
thousands of them have gone broke 
fighting the battle of liberty in the 
furrows. 



A British expert says that the Unit- 
ed States will be the deciding factor 
In the air In defeating Germany. It 
has been a favorite American maxim 
that there la always room at the top, 
and here Is a brilliant chance to prove 
it, 



The theory that England and France 
lured Uncle Sam into the war with 
;the intention of hanging back and let- 
ting him do the fighting is not getting 
much support from people who are 
keeping track of General Halg. 



j That British officer who climbed 
over the top and shouted out to Ger- 
man snipers what he thought of them 
for firing on the Bed Cross flag prob- 
ably got more satisfaction out of It 
than had he killed them. 



^ Opinion In Berlin is being revised 
about thai contemptible little British 
army. It Is now being looked on, If 
not officially, yet positively, with con- 
siderable wholesome, not to say chas- 
tened respect. 



The Lokal Anzelger of Berlin states 
that tho war has exposed In its naked- 
ness much that is low und contempt- 
ible. And the Berlin puper certainly 
should be familiar with such things. 



■ ■ ■■ 



When a fair young widow begins to 
scout for No. *.', iba suspends further 
tender references to No. 1 until after 
•he hni bagged her qunrry. 



Uermuny ha* shut off sh.iunsnts of 
coal to Holland and, paradoxical as it 
may seem, that action bus m«da the 
Hollanders hot. 



A 



JUDQE 1 s. cum 

Of Bracken County Strongly 
Endorsed for Governor. 



(Braoen Chronicle.) 
Next year-1919— tho Democrats 
ol Kentucky will be called upon 
to select a candidate for Gov- 
ernor, one that the Democrats of 
the entire State can unite onf, to 
have any hopes of winning. We 
do not believe that there is a 
member of the party in tho State 
but that will agree that it will 
require a united party and a 
strong man at tho neaa of the 
ticket to win. 

There is no denying the fact that 
at the preset time there ia a 
great deal of dissatisfaction over 
the State with the new tax laws 
a nd other measures passed by thn 



last Legislature, approved bv the 
presor* Administration, all of 
which has caused our Republican 
friends great joy, and as may be 
imagined they are making the 
most of • it in a political way. 

The next Democratic candidate 
for Governor of Kentucky, to win, 
must bo a man upon whom both 
the wet and dry win jb of the<par-« 
ty can unite on. The candidates for 
the other State offices must be 
strong men, from different sec- 
tions of tho Commonwealth. Ken 
tucky Democracy must stand to- 
gether as a singlo ~*ari; 

How are we going to be able 
to achieve the dedircd result of 
a united party? The answer is 
sifhple enough. Pick a leader 
who has no connection with any 
click -or faction— one with, no ax 
to grind, one having the confi- 
dence of tho people, onswho has 
proven himself to bo a friend of 
the people in tho past, one who 
could accept the highest office 
within the gift of the people 
of the State, and enter upon its 
duties with clean hands— with no 
enemies to punish or friends 
whom he would be compelled to 
reward to tho detriment of the 
affairs of the State. When a man 
of this caliber is Related We be-, 
liovn th a t K ent u ck y w itt-roti — trp 
its usual Democratic majority for 
the State ticket at the next 
election, notwithstanding the fact 
that Edwin P. Morrow, the ablest 
Republican in Kentucky will like- 
ly be the standard bearer of his 
party. 

If tho Chronicle was asked to 
select the man who will fill th> 
above requirements, we would 
suggest E. S Clarke, Appelate 
Judge from this district. Judge 
Clarke is a comparatively young 
man— about 45— is a native of Fal- 
mouth, a son of the late A. R, 
Clarke, who served as the State 
Senator from this district. He 
served as County Jud.-re of Pond-, 
loton counfcy for several years, and 
was acting in this capacity w-hen 
he was elected without opposition 
to the Appellate bench, and since 
he has been in Frankfort has 
made a most excellent record as 
a jurist as a member of thehigh-f 
est tribunal in the State. 

There is no better qualified man 
in Kentucky to serve the people 
of his State as Governor than 
Judge Clarke; he is clean and 
wholesome, wearine no man's col- 
lar, and for every Democratic voti* 



The Leader of the Allies. 



The evening Posy haft/ always 
maintained that the proper place 
to judge an American public man 
was in America, but, in asmuch as 
so much was made between 1914 
and 1917 by the opponents of the 
President aboui: "what they" say in 
Europe about the President, it is 
important that European opinion 
of the President be fully under- 
stood. 

The recent address of the Pres- 
ident before Congress upon the sub 
ject of America's war aims has 
made an impression in France be- 
yond that oi anyother address by 
any other American since this 
country was founded. The Petit 
Parisien says that address "is the 
iinest piece of political literature 
oi our times. It lays down the ba- 
sis upon whkh C~ world, after be 
ing rid of the perpetual menace of 
Tinned — conflicts^ may 



FORTY YEARHGO TODAY 

Items Taken From the Issue of 
The Recorder of Janua- 
ry 24th, 1878 



am 



ri'Hiri 1 - 



structoqV' 

Still more complimentary is tho 
Paris Temps. Alter recalling ,the 
that it once alluded to Mr. LloyU' 
George, whom it admires greatiy, 
as the "Prime Minster of Eu- 
rope," that journal tells us that be- 
him Llord Gjeorle in a stronger 
figure than his. The. greatest na- 
tion now at war is directed by the 
first of living statesmen. At the 
council of tho allies the President 
of the United States sits at the 
lead of the tabief." 

Other information from Paris 
shows that this dn'bounded admir- 



Why not have the mail route 
swtended from Burlington to Bel- 
le view? 

Charles Conner, of Gunpowder, 
raised 10,700 pounds ol tobacco on 
DM acres of land. 



Corn thieves are using wagons 
in Hebron neighborhood. 



John Harper, of Hebron, Is very 
ill. 



Those interested In the bu ilding, 
ol the proposed Woolper oike-MiSi f lBO , sallo wed up fow-mrHtetr 

j_ j i «. , F aL- . lava' *trr\i»rfi r%4 iA.«rAi a Knlnnnini 



requested tp meat at* tno Wooi- 
per school house on the 30th inst. 



W. gf Smith, for Assessor, 
Dills, for County Clerk and 
""^S. Cason, for Constable are 
nounced this week. 



Asa 

;m- 



Soldiers' Pensions 



If a soldier pr - sailor is killed, 
and he had a wife and children, 
the Government will provide com- 
pensation for the wife, so long 
as she remains unmarried, ana 
support the children until they 

ation - -of.' the American Presidents becoflie 18 /ears of age. These pay 

is not confined to the French merits range from $25 for a widow 

press. When the news reached th;> 

Freneh chamber oi L>eputiefl that 



President Wilson was making a 
war speech before the American 
Congress, the members of that 
body remained in the hall until 
midnight to get the text of the 
address, and the building rang 
with cheers when it was road 
from the rostrum. Later , it was 
decided tp placard tho address 
over France and to use airplane* 
to drop copies printed in Ger 



alone to $57.50 "for a widow and 
four jchiWrem — ff- the man iatu- 
tally disabled thc x Governmentwi!l 
make a fixed monthly\jjayment to 
him ranging from $30 *& month', if 
he is married, to $75 anawi'JT if 
he has a wife and three or it 
children. Should he be so helpi 
as to require a nurse or attend- 
ant he will be given up to $2C 
additional. Should he lose both 
feet, both hands, or both eyes, 
or be permanently bedridden, he 



The Oeean's Greedy Maw. 

It is estimated that more than 
one billion eight hundred million 
dollars' worth of marine" property 
lies at tbe bottom of the sea, 
most of it in the war area With- 
in the barnacled hulks are con- 
tained riches beyond the dreams 
of avarice, It is not strange there 
fore that all over the world", 
and especially in America and 
Great Britain, schemes are being 
studied for the future reclama- 
tion of much of this wealth 

It is said that gold valued, fit 
ten million dollars was stored in 
a strong room on an upper deck 
of the Lusitnnia, This ship Ilea 
in three hundred feet of water 
rot many miles off the "coast of 
Ireland, Twelve and a half • mil- 
lion dollars are reported to have 
gone down on the Yasftka Maru in 
the Mediterranean, a sea which 




man within the lines of theenemy. : will be paid $100 a month wheth 

er he is a bachelor or married. 



In Old Kaintueky and 

In New Kaintueky. 



In Italy tho reception was the 
same and jymjiejffspajiera oi Rome, 
ah a Milan allude not only in 
glowing terms to the address, 
but, almost without exception, a? 
cept the verdict of the French 
proas that the American Presi- j The Kentucky Legislature has 
dent is the strongest man in the voted for the constitutional amend 
camp of ths allies. I men t that would create a dry 

From Washington we read of | nation The home of Bourbon is 
the arrival at that capital of the \ thus placed among the first of 
Duke of Devonshire, British Gov- the necessary thirty-six States 
ernor of Canada, the head of- a | which would say that man's lips 



lars* worth of jewels belonging to 
the Maharajah of Kapurthala, ship 
pod on the Geq/L ong Hundreds of 
other ships carried money and 
valuables In varying amounts and 
many of these victims of the Hun 
lie in comparatively shallow wat- 
"er. Our own shores are dotted 
with craft which went down dur- 
ing storms in times of peace* 

Scientific men, however, declare 
that wrecks lying even so near 
the surface as the Lusitania will 
baffle human skill In Honolulu 
harbor divers working on the ill- 
fated K-4 went down to 28g feeft, 
a world's record. They used a 
special form of steel armor But 
at that depth, it is impossiblefor 
human beings to »'ojk -effective- 
ly, WGStrof Thjr*nSe» sJHpTI*«=: 
ward which mam ia turning covet- 
ous eyes lie \m the open sea or i» 
unprotjejstefl roadsteads, It woufa 
be iwyrt to impossible to conduct 
sal/jtge operations under such con 
"ions; Here and there hardy 
vers using new appliances may 
reclaim from Neptune some of 
his loot But most of these ships 
and most of their riches for ever 
have disappeared from the sight 
of man, 



his Republican opponent would 
be able to coax away from! him, 
Judge Clarke would land two Re-» 
publicans. 

The above cut is a fairly (good 
likeness of Judge Clarke. Look 
him over and seo if "vou do not 
agree with the -Chronicle that he 
is big enough to fill theCrov-i 
ernor's chair in the riffw Capitol 
at Frankfort. 



great English family that has al 
ways been identified with Eng- 
lish Liberalism. The Duke told tho 
reporters, that, when h;> read the 
President's address in the Ot- 
tawa newspapers he determined 
at once to come to Washington 
to congratulate the President in 
person upon "an historic docu-^ 
ment that will stand out through 
all time." The Duke called at the 
White House and presumably told 
the President what he had * pre- 
viously said to the press. 

The comments of the British 
pross were given fully immediate 
ly after the text of the President's 
address reached that country. It 
is 'noteworthy that every .publiv 
meeting since reference has 
been made to tho address ana 
the references an.*, in almost 



| shall not partake of beer in Mil-. 

j waukee, shall not drink a cock-! 

tail in New York, or become drs^ 

] cursive over a highball in Louis- 

i villo We can almost see the 

i moribund spirit of Bourbon rise 

with accusing finger and utter 

"ET tu, Kentucky' 7 

Ponder how Kentucky must 
have changed that an almost un- 
animous vote to create a dry na- 
tion should have been cast in its 
Legislature There was a time 
when Kentucky was proud of .its 
whisky It mentioned the quality 
of its Bourbon as it praised the 
beauty of its women and the ped- 
igrees of its horses, Under inspir- 
ational conditions, its politicians 
became statesmen and its civilians 
were menamorphosed into col- 
ari', in almost — bv- onelH Ita government was unre^ 
ery case, eulogistic. Not the !' generate Democracy tempered by 
least prized by Americans of these j assassination But it had its 



Wants a Drastic Dog Law 

In your issue of the 10th inst., 
I notice that some are urging a 
state dog law, something that 
seems very unlikely we will ever 
get to be effective in Kentucky 
for the reason that many of our 
county representatives are indif- 
ferent to the real needs of an 
adequate law, and .the mountain 
fellows are always readv to fight 
In defense of this VALUABLE an- 
imal, the worthless dog. My sug- 
gestion is that we all pull togeth- 
er for a national dog law, carry 
a $2 tax on males' and $20 on 
female dogs with a jail sentence} 
attached for any person caught 
with a female dog in their pos- 
session without having paid the 
license, and I think our dog 
troubles would soon disappear. 
C. O. HEMPFLING). 

From "Somewhere in France" 

A few days siwc a card au- 
dressed to Wallace Rice, ot which 
th© following is a copy, was re- 
ceived at the Burlington postof- 
fice : 

December 26th, 1917. 
Somfcwhere in France. 

"Kind Friend(:— Yesterday I re- 
ceived a Christmas package from 
tho Red Cross, The tobacco kit 
containing this card was one of 
tho several welcome gift*. I as- 
sure you that I greatly appre- 
ciate your kindness and wish to 
thank you for the same. Most of 
us fellows spent a rather unusual 
Christmas, this year and it was 
pretty nice to receive these 
things from folks back in I he 
States. "Yours Truly, 

"ROBERT H. GAINES, 

7 Aero Squadron, 
A. M f Im.iixv." 

Taking a Measle Vacation 

The BeUevtaw and i st eraee r f 

ftchl>nl'» ill> I ,1. |||| .Ul •nl.> 

^u of the «»pidi 
Hi in II 

two low 



commendations will bo 
Viscount James Bryce. 

As .tima passes-libers 
there probably will be, 
sent among the now 
pean of praise, but of 
there can be no doubt, 
the future, the President 



that 

ryifttif 
same dls- 
unbroken 
one fact 
now or in 
of the 
United States is everywhena rec- 
ognized in Europe, by his en- 
emies and by his friends. as Sa 
man of commanding ability, en- 
dowed with unrivaled powers of 
expression, a will of iron ana 
unsurpassed powers of leadership. 
Against such a verdict the malig- 
nant outpourings of Mr. Roosevelt 
will beat in vain.— Louisville Ev- 
ening Post. 



Thrifty One-Arm Farmer. 



George Knorr, of near Gardners- 
vllle, has the use of onlyonejarm, 
but he does not let that handi- 
cap him in his farm workv In 

1916 he raised 4.000 pounds of to-; 
bacco on" 2^ acres of land', and in 

1917 he raised 8,500 pounds onjtwo 
acres He can plow, hoe and strip 
tobacco and does all kinds of farm 
work with one hand, Mr. Knorr itj 
an old railroad mftui and came to 
Pendleton 
having wor 

R, for years. He is married ana 
his wife and daughter constitutes 
his family, He is an all round 
good fellow, and we wish him 
continued success out in the tall 
and uncut If Mr. Knorr hadtfcen 
raised on the farm, and had ithe) 
use of l>oth arms, he would. be< 
one of those horny-handed fel 
lows that you read about In the 
old blue book,— Falmouth Outlook. 



ol ! great men, its Clsys, its Breck- 
inridgefj, its Lindsays,- its Wat- 

b e , | ter sona And a bov e all it-stooa 

out as the representative of the 
colonial customs and manners of 
Virginia, westward carrying' the 
empire of their charm. 

It was not a moral Kentucky, 
perhaps, in a Puritanical sense 
Perhaps it was not an efficient 
-Ken tucky as efficienty is under 
fitaod in th|ese days of inteuH 
sive industrial demands. It may 
not have been a sociological Ken 
tucky according to the standards 
that have arisen in our content? 
orary community life. But it was 
an attractive Kentucky, a roman- 
tic Kentucky. Somehow the blue 
grass was bluer m those days 
and a Kentucky beauty had a 
regal individuality and an inher- 
ent charm, that made her an ex- 
otic in other climes. The men of 
Kentucky were gentlemen of ad- 
venture, modern cavaliers who 
could appreciate beauty, weave an 
anecdote and discourse upon the 
Almanac Got ha of thorough- 
breds. They may have been 
colonels by convivial brevet, but 
they wore their honorary titles 
with grace and distinction 

It may be that it is 



countv three vehrsasro / " ma y *** tnat tt ta * more 
Seed ot theT & O g H moral > a more efficient, a more 

R - sociological Kentucky which has 
voted to join the caravan of 
thirty-six States which would lead 
a nation across the desert sands 
of prohibition. But let us thank 
the gods for having had old Ken- 
tucky !— Cincinnati Times-Star. 



master Root Maurer Improvin g 

Robert, little son of Mr. and Mrs 
Charles Mnurcr, was operateo on 
last Friday evening by Dr. Langs- 
dale, of Cincinnati, to relieve him 
of an absoess that hud formed on 
one of his lungs as a result of 
the pneumonia from which the 
ltttk» fellow had suffer<>d consldr 
erably". The operation was ' huo- 
ocMtful and afforded the patient 
considerable relief, und lie haulm 
proved noma In tho past low 
\ v«t-v aertotts bowaj trou 
loliovi i J luoumunla mm 

g.' 1 i umli 
i days. I 

ilhupposrUiir. 



(! 



b'U 



old wut m 
1 1 tor 
BppPSI 



Conserving Fuel 

Dr. R W, Duncan, lncal Fuel Ad- 
ministrator, had no trouble what- 
ever enforcing Mr. Garfield's br- 
der for certain industries and bus- 
iness houses to use no fuel last 
Monday. The local stores closed 
their doors at noon, which was 
somowhat of an inconvenience to 
quite a number of persons who 
came In from tho country to do 
son** trading, they not knowing 
of the order that had been ia- 
aued In regard to conservation of 
fuel on Moiulay. The same order 
of things will prevail each Mon- 
day to and including the Uth of 
March. 



i look «i tho thornaum* 



Not all human problems are mor 
al problems. 

A big percentage ol the difficul- 
ties of humanity are to be solved 
only through good management. 

In the present world crisis man- 
agement is perhaps as important 
a factor as morality. 

There are situations and (ileas 
of effort whero we know concrete- 
ly what is right and wrong— where 
men are unanimous in their decis- 
ions as to what is right ana 
wrong— and yet there is no com- 
prehension in these particular sit- 
uations mil the way to achieve 
what is right. 

One nation, for instance, is long 
on morality and short on technic. 

Another is long on technic ana 
short on morals of any kind; 

Nations have their times of soul 
triah just as have individuals. 

The individual prays that he may 
live a well-rounded life with re- 
alized ethics that keep his heart 
clean without leaving him devoid 
of a technic of management suf- 
ficient to enable him to meet the 
bread and butter problem, 

Natlnnii shrnrtri raise a similar 

prayer with all possible fervor— 
meanwhile work <• like the dicK- 
ens to make the prayer come true 
—Chicago News. 

Passed by Big Majority. 

Tho Woman's Suffrage joint res- 
olution , passed the House in Con- 
gress, by a vote of 274 to 136,104 
Democrats, 166 Republicans, 3 So-, 
cialists, 1 Progressive and 1 Pro- 
hibitionist voting for the reso- 
lution, while 102 Democrats, 33 
Republicans and, one Progressive 
voted against it. All of Kentucky's 
members of the House except 
Helm, Kinchejoe, Rouse and Shir- 
ley voted for the resolution. The 
very close vote in tho house was 
a surprise to the advocates of th*» 
resolution. No action wijl prob- 
ably be taken in the Senate un- 
til the suffragists believe they 
have the votes with which to 
put it through. March 19th r 1914, 
the Senate defeated a similar res 
olution by a vote of 35 to 34, 86 
Senators not voting. There are 
cow twelve suffrage states with 
an electoral vote of 193. New 
York is the latest recruit to tj*e> 
suffrage column. 

Plenty of Grain in the U. S. 

Chicago, i Jan. 18.— Representa- 
tives from grain exchanges all ov 
er the country declared at a con- 
vention of the National Council of 
Grain Exchanges, that there is 
plenty of grain to supply the needs 
of the United States and the Al- 
lies during 1918, but it is up to 
the Government to move It from 
the farms to the centers of dis- 
tribution. Corn and wheat crops 
last year, delegates stated, ex- 
ceeded all expectations They saia 
that an .even greater yield was 
expected thia year,. Conditions for 
winter wheat were, said to be 
better than at any time during the 
last ten years 

Stood H Weil. 

Livestock has stood tho severe 
winter remarkably well, owing 



BLOGGET GIVEN 20 YEARS 

Judge Wade Gives Lecture aa" 
He Sends Convicted Trai- 
tor to Prison. 



(Britt, Iowa, News.) 

"I sentence you to twentv years 
in the federal penitentiaty"at Lea 
venworth." • 

Amid a deathlike silence in the 
federal court room, Judge Martin 
J. Wade at 2:30 o'clocK Friday 
pronounced these words upon D. 
T. Blodgett, convicted of treason, 
The court room was packed. Doz- 
ens were turned away by the bail- 
iffs at the doors. 

u l could, under the law, sen-) 
tence you to sixty years in pri- 
son," said tho judge sternly. "Men 
who oppose the government in 
of t he- nation 's — ag o ny - 
ought to be taken out against 
a stone wall and shot. Put the 
law is not vindictive. I lix your 
bond at S25,000." 

"Tho spirit of this nation,'' con- 
tinued Judge Wade, "is kindness, 
tolerance and generosity. This na- 
tion is willing to fight the en- 
emy on the front; she is willing 
to fight tho assassins of the air,' 
the pirates of the seas andt the 
masters of the most brutal cruel- 
ty that the world has ever 
known— she is willing to figh.. 
all of these, but: she will not 
consent to be scabbed in the 
back, and traitors must sheath 
their knives or submit to exter-» 
mination." 

Tho entire court roomjwas y|s* 
ibly stirred by these words ana) 
Sgter several women wept openly 
whan the judge said : 

"Fathers and mothers are send- 
ing forth their boys to yield their 
lives, it necessary, in the catif* 
of human liberty. Men and women 
are giving their hard earnings to 
support these boys and »to make 
tbom effective in this war. Little 
children are giving their pennies. 

"Isn't it too had in this na- 
tion's hour of trial that a few, 
thank _Gpd, only . Jk3f 
rebels against authority, who are 
traitors to their country— seek to 
neutralize the sacrificS*^J vtheir 
neighbors.", \ 

"I have looked into your r*b 
cord, Mr. Blodgett. I find thatyoir* 
have always manifested supreme 
contempt for instruments of your 
government. You have. defied the 
courts. You have reviled and abua 
ed some of the ablest judgeethat 
ever sat upon the bench in Iowa. 
You have libelled and maligned' 
some of the most glorons patriots 
of-our great comm onw e alth. 

"You have attempted to have 
judges arrestea and prosecutea be 
cause they disagreed with you 
about your rights. You have, 
brought suits for gross amounts 
against jurists because they have 
faithfully performed their du+y.** 

"You have served time in ther 
penitentiary. It was a lesson which 
^rou- would not heed. You have- 
refused bv your own acts to con- 
form to the rules of society. You i 
have no business at large ui 
vou learn that this nation can 
'be compelled to submit to insult 
and infamy." „ 

Judge Wade paid but little at- 
tention to the prisoner's plea* 
r hat h o , wan n i 

the time the seditious pamphlets 
were written. 

"You have manifested an un- 
usual shrewdness for an insane^ 
person in the courtroom. It your 
h. sanity is spasmodic you should 
be placed where you should hajre 
proper care and attention. But as 
a matter of fact you put up this 
plea of insanity, only when you 
are hard pressed and need a 
loophole. There is no loophole 
this time." 



1 




"*—^ 



I 



I 



1 






NNi 






n. 



the owners be 
to protect " 
m*r in tkJUaco, 

ive his. rontliu 

oa dim* uiuktiit: 

*"MKM.> iiu'IMK pf 

^Jis A»h oa • iiti>ro 

fuuiM. Ui se 

ami iiiIh-i i »Mls, i 

Ml'Vttd hi Wiy MM 1 1 l»'HH> 

vuHuk for ulluti i 
niMtl*M ■eaai ibi* nu 

a breaa Oslo Ivf unsjr 7 



to 

better prepared 

early every fsr- 

prepared 

nitbla prof 

thor at. 




such 



ihtil** 



Brought a Serious Condition. 

•Ship losses and crop 
abroad have brought apout 
serious food situation in the 
countries that the United State* 
planning to release for export 
additional ninety , million busl 
of wheat, although the country* 
export surplus had been snipped 
by the middle of last December, 
The American people will be 
ed by the Food Administration 
cut their consumption to 
up the amount to be exportlKl. 
And unless they do it is claimed 
that the nation is threatened 
with a flour shortage in May 
fore the new wheat crop is 
vested in June. The Food A 
istration is preparing a law 
enforce wheatiess days. 

He Like7 Florida 

Renewing his subscription totb 
Recorder W. T Davis writes from 
Riverview, Florida: 

"We are living in our own home 
on the farm, and I am well sat- 
isfied with .Florida to make my 
future home. We have a beautiful 
home on the Alify river, 13 miies. 
south of Tampa and one and a 
half miles from tho bay." 

Thought Grant a Dry County 

During one of the recent sero 
(H-rioiis, Al Biddle, who lives two 
mUes south of town, killed a 
rge btaclrsnake in some fodder. 
ontraryjJto moat snske stories 
thip was not crawling 
was frown perfectly 
County News 




Co 
his 
aiouj 
tl /you 

appreo! 



sti 



to\i suffa 




moons to 
wall Th 
men gf 
credit 
health 
joa, Ti 

•rugsy and ther* la' n* 
■ h longer they call 
good advaatafjt* 



Sled Uleful. 

r who has no sJed ia 

under very great dhisd- 

this winter. Thay have 

necessity for sevsrai 



'daily 



*^^ 



mm 



—mm* 



™ 



TRnmSDAY JANUARY 24th, 1918. 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



^WALTON DEPARTMENT.^ 

D. B. WALLACE, Manager. 

" Hand your news items to Mr. D. B. Wallace at the Walton Equita-I^j 

ble Bank and Trust Co.'s building. He is also authorised to re- '?& 

cieve subscription* and collect other accounts. Jfc 

Lawrenceburg Citizens Hike It 
To the Woods. 



Mr*. Sara Glenn and son Roll no* 
moved from Covington to her 
property in Walton. 

• • * * 

Walton graded school has resum 
ed its work after a vacation caus- 
ed by the cold weather. 

» * * • 

Hugh K. Watson spent part «-i 
last week in Covington, guest of 
hie ,f.isterinlaw, Mrs. "Susie Wat- 
eon. 

• ♦ » « 

Jno. C Miller has been quite ill 



Lawreneeburg, Ind., Jan 21, 1918. 
The continued bad weather has 
brought many of onr citizens to 
t lie point where they nepd fuel and 
food, and the town government is 
using every means at its com- 
the past week with grippe, can- mand to afford relief, and today 
tinea to his home a. part of the 
time. 

♦ » » * 
Geo. B Powers, the real estate 
agent, has been confined to his 
home the past week with a severe 
cold. _ 



Mrs. Neander Stephens of Bank 
Lick, has accepted a position ol 
teacner in the Covington public 
schools. 



Miss Marie Menefee who 
ident 
jn ill 



is a 
student at Hanover College, has 
been ill with diphtheria at her 
home in Covington, but is now 
better. 

• » * » 

Mr. and Mrs, Albert Johnson wel 
corned the arrival of a newdaugh 
ter at their home last week, weigh- 
ing maie pouniis. i)r O, C. Ran Kin 
attending. 

• • • • 

Robert Co/fman, who is a mem- 
ber of Company 336, Field Artil- 
lery at Camp Taylor, has been pro- 
moted to Corporal with an increase 
of six dollars per month. 

• • • • 

Mr. Floyd Smith and Miss Maud 
Friend were married in Covington 
last Thursday. The groom is the 
eon qi _Mr». and Mia George Smith 
ol Walton, and the oride is th* 



a large volunteer force of citizens 
is out collecting wood for the U9e 
of those who are out ot fuel. 
The town is looking after the 
needy the very best it can. 
• ••• 

The factories have been shut 
down since last Thursday to as- 
sist in the conservation of fuel. 
I ifeuggested that we all go to 
bed to keep "warm until there is 
a change in conditions, and a 
iriend at once asked what we 
Mould do when the bed clothes 
gi ve ou t, '■ » 



• •« * 

Fowler's and Kyle's cold weath- 
er experience created considera- 
ble merriment on the part of sev- 
eral Lawrenceburgers who read ot 
it. 

• • • • 

— The— P e tersbu r g men -who~work 
here have been going back ana 
forth on the ice for some time, 
and it looks like it will be some 
time yet before a break in the 
ice interferes with their trips. 

• •• • 

I suggest to Ransom Ryle thai 
hereafter in cold weather he per- 
mit his cat to sleep under the 
bed cover, to, protect his toe (from 
/ t re e ring,' -whiter Charles Fowler 
might prevent his lamp wick from 



daughter of Mr.— and Mrs •iJreo^^gBrfree^ing• bv soaking it in alcohol. 
Friend, of Krlanger. j This advice is gratuitous. 

Mrs. Clyde Perry of Owen coun 
ty, Mr. and Mrs. James Giore o" LIQUOR INTERESTS 



Cincinnati, Ebb Morria of Dayton, MADE HARD FIGHT. 

Ohio, and Mr. and Mrs Jus, Clore 

of Warsaw, were here last week Frankfort, Jan. 22 — The state- 
attending the funeral of their wide prohibition bill of Senator W. 
relative Mrs. Grace Weldon A. Frost, of Wingo, a Democrat, 

/ • • • paested the Senate today by the 

Chas. I*. Griffith spent part of | overwhelming vote of 25 to_6. The 



- l a st w e e k-ife iKmiswlh^att^mitng 
the annual/ banquet of the Inter- 
Soutlftrn-^Life Insurance Co., at 
th/> invitation of E. Si Ree\es,the 

/special agent, whom Mr. Griffith 
has been assisting in this 
tory. 

» * •• 

Jesse S. Thornton of Elliston 
Station, spent Saturday here wicn 
friends. He had been in Covington 
attending the bedBide of John W. 
Sasber by whom he was employed 
for many years in his store, at 
Elliston. He reports Mr, Hasher 
in a very serious condition. 

Jos. Readnour bought the two 
story dwelling house of Miss Eliz- 
abeth Sechrest last week for $2,- 
000 through Geo. B, Powers, real 
estate agent, and will move from 
his farm to Walton by March 1st. 
Conaway Webster of Gailatin-co., 
has rented the Readnour farm for 
the coming year. 

• • • • 



— — ■ —r. " — — ^- a t a i» mAiui 5^A4* 1 i nil 

61 of the constitution so as to 
prohibit the manufacture, sale 
and transportation of intoxicat- 
ing liquors in Kentucky after June 
terri-, 30, 1920. 

The Senators voting for the 
Frost bill were Antle, Bradley, 
Lreck, Carter, Frost, Glenn, Har- 
lan, Gardner, Harris, Hinkle, Hon. 
Lewis Lit tr ell, Morris, McFarland, 
Nunn, Parks, Peak, Richardson, 
Rives, Rogers, Sanders, Suns, Tay- 
lor, Smith, Swineford, Thompson 
and Whitaker, total 28. 

The Senators voting against the 
bill were Burton, Combs, Huffaker, 
Helm, Perry, Simmons, total 6. 

All the Senators against the bill 
with the exception of Burton, rep 
resent wet districts. Senator Bur- 
ton, of Dry Ridge, represents "the 
Twfentyt-Bixth District, composed 
of Bracken, Grunt and Pendleton 
counties. 

Representatives of the liquor in- 
terests, particularly* the brewer- 
ies, made a hard fight, first to 
defeat the bill, and finally to 
extend the time for prohibition to 
take effect. 



The announcement is jroade of 
the approaching nuptials of Chas. 
Edward Farrell and Miss Mary Ag- 
nes Ryan, the ceremony to be per- 
formed at St. Patrick's church in 
Verona, Saturday, January 26th. 

The bride is the daughter o f Mr. ' A SOUND PROVISO. 
and Mrs. Michael Ryan of »near 
Walton, and the groom is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs, Edward Farrell, of 
Verona. 



Walton Loos^ Leaf Tobacco mar- 



t\. 



(New York Times*) 
The Legislatures of Mississippi, 
Kentucky and Virginia have blithe 
ly ratified the prohibition ameno- 
. ment. It is unfortunate that ev- 
toet called off its sale last Satur- »ry state constitution doesn't con 
day because of the large manufact, tain this proviso of that of 
urers having called off their buy- , Tennessee, substantially repeated 
ers for a week because tof the in Florida's: 

cold weather and the shortage of "No convention or General As- 
shipping facilities. The market sembly of this state shall act 
is getting better in price and a sale upon any amendment of the Con- 
mi he held at Walton next SaU stitution of the U. & proposed by 
lUrday, January 26th, when about, Congress to the several states, 
'100,000 pounds of tobacco is expect unless such convention or General 
ed to.be on the market. . Asajsmbly shall have been elect-* 
• ••• fed after such amendment is sub- 
Fred Milter, who is stationed at : mitted." 
Camp Taylor, writes that on ac-| No Legislature should act on a 
count of the vast amount of , constitutional amendment without 
the derkical work in his depart- a direct mandate from the people. 
ment, the aviation corps, he will The alteration of the fundamental 
be retained at Louisville for a law is not for uninstructed lcgis- 
of months longer at the lators to ratify on their own 
. request o* his department, ' look.' 
Eeing an excellent clerk. Henry S, ' '■ 



U 







Percival who has a similar posi-i W. D. Sutton, county farm agent, 
Hon in another department will was a caller at this office Wed- 
Slso be kept at Louisville for some nesday morning and left for pub 
»-» as his services can hardly be lication some information of inter 
pensed with. est to the farmers of this county 

's± "*■** . !"i regard to a fertilizer that they 

The past two weeks have been may need in the planting of their 
worst experienced in cold wea crops. 
• in many years. The ther- imm 

meter registered as low as 30, Farmer Sandford was in yester- 

*S em J£ eio ? r ^ f D ? m i W to d& Y afternoon, and in 20 point 

depth of about two feet cov- balck expressed himself in sym- 

~i h £ ^nndt *«d in somepla- pa thy with those who are scarce 

ces drifted to the depth of six of fuel> and from hifl talk he u 

feet stopping travel on the main ready to contribute a cord or 

highways, causing the rural mail more to anyone who is in need 

routes to be discontinued forsev- f wood. NIT 

oral days, and a general sloppage ^ m 

of business of all kinds. RaHroao Tft coun t rv 8C hools h.ve h***n 
^vice was greatly impaired, some htL \.£ ™ an ^ d Time th 8 aVC wj J^ r n 
of the trains being nnaUe to make Tho c *, d and w h n m JdS ft 
their trips and all behmd their hard for the utUe M \ Xhave 
time schedule, making the mails j^,, attending 
v<e*y Irregular. The coat shortage *' 

caused some Buffering but the sit-' „,. _ #v ^»„ „,„ , v ,,.. 

ustion was relieved by the arrival .^fen i!nHm^ ny hu i ,din *» ■» 
of Wvwal ears of coal obtained " ^ ^J** 1 ™ °"/^ >Unt V 
through W.C Hrown 1 -om the Krn '** J*. * nd . 6now ' and some roofs 
tueky co al mines. HZJ. 

i^^^l£^S^h.^il'5w Judge Cason, Mrs. Babe Riddell 
W.?»itlS\ "' ,f0 n n - s^d >hor. about^ t urlington ar. 



LOCAL FARMERS 

TO OET NITRATE 

Government to Sell Nitrate For 
Fertilizer Through Coun- 
ty Agents. 

Notice has been given to W. 1) 
Sutton, Agricultural Agant for 
Boone county, that th? \J. S Lk>- 
partment of AgncuUvuc will sell 
at cost a supply of nitrate of 
soda to farmers in Boone county. 
The nitrate was purchase*! 
through the War Industries Board 
under the authority of the Pooa 
Control Act as ap art of the 
program for stimulating agricul- 
tural production. It will be un- 
loaded at Atlantic ports and the 
price will be $75.50 a ton, free? on 
board cars at port of arrival. Far- 
mers are to pay in addition 
freight from port of arrival ana 
the State fertilizer tag fee. 

HOW TO OBTAIN NITRATE - 
Applications for a part of the 
100,000 tons of nitrate bought hy 
the government will be , receive.! 
only from actual farmers or own- 
ers or holders of farms for use on 
their land, and may be made 
through County Agent W. D, Sut- 
ton, or through-anv_ ~^m.bA»- '- f 
local committee consisting oi 
William P. Bradford, Florence 
Edgar C. Riley, Petersburg. 
William H. Clayton, Hebron 
No money will be required with, 
the application but upon notice 
from the County Agent farmers 
who Jhavo signed applications 
must deposit with a local bank, 
association, or individual, desig- 
nated by the Secretary of Agricul 
ture to act as the farmers'hgent 
for that purpose, money to cov- 
er the cost of the fertilized ex- 
cept the freight charge. After 
the money is tsanswrffted to 
Washington the njfrate will be 
shipped to the farniers. If 
plications for thVnitrnr<> <>Tr» 
"the supply "oT about 100,000 tons 
the government will allot the sup- 
ply on a pro rata basis among 
those who applied. Applications 
must be received by February 4th. 
Nitrate fertiliser' can be bought 
in j ta ' or m one-half to one- 
third cheaper than In mixed or 
complete fertilizers. This nitrogen 
fertilizer is particularly suited to 
the growing of truck crops, such 
as potatoes and the various veg- 
etables going on the early mar 
ket. 



Seeds that Grow 

is what you want when you buy ; seeds that have 
high purity and germination tests. 

You can get weed seeds for nothing. We know 
Seeds, and we have the best connections in the seed 
producing sections of the country, which enables 
us to go direct to the section where grown, and get 
the purest and best to be had. 

Every bag of Seed we send out is tagged as to 
purity and germination according to the Kentucky 
PURE FOOD LAW, and you will always find our 
Seeds above the standard. Write prices and sam- 
ples and be convinced. We are now the largest 
in r Northern Kentucky. 

United States Food Administration License No. G 1770. 



7 C€dfr<*™irunKre> 



~^ GROCERIES, FLOUR SELDS. MEDICINES 
13-21 PIKE ST. IS -2 O W. 7™ ST. 



Covington, Kentucky. 



Phones South 335 and 336. 



Sheriff's f *Je for Taxes. 

Notice is hereby given that I or my 
deputy will, on Monday, February 



on 



4th. 1018. it being county court day, 
between the hours of 10 a. m.' and 2 
It can be used profitably j o'clock p.m., at the Court House 
any Intensive crops. if you door, in the town of Burlington, 
have a backward field of wheat Boone County, Ky., expose to public 
or yonng greass, at the present sale for cash in hand, the following 
prices, a light top dressing of i described property, or so much there- 
100 pounds per acre will make it of an may be necessary to pay State, 
mean dollars and cents to you. County and School taxes due there- 

, i m and unpaid for the year 1917, and 
1 the interest, penalty and cost there- 
{ on. For a complete description of 
: property see Assessor's book for as- 
♦ *i??W - a A beer ? ^ ad . e b y tne eessmeiit. of 1916, at Conntv Clerk's 

Ofllce. W. D. CROPPER, 

Ex-SherifT Boone County. 

Belleview Precinct. 
No. HUl Kelly, Elbert heirs 

84 acres land $ w.10 

No. 937 Rico Heirs 

Lot in Belleview 8.05 

Constance Precinct. 

No. 1499 Clark, John B., nr 

2 lots in Constance 5.88 

No. 1661 Phelps, Lewis 

85 acres land and lot 28.G5 
No. 1711 Souther, E. A. 

58 acres land 40.10 

Florence Precinct. 
No. 1962 Conner. F. R. 

1 lot in Florence 8.04 

No. 2001 Dulaney, B. A. 

2 lots in Florence. . . 20.80 
No. 2151 Rhodes, Albert, 10a of 

land near Kenton line. 22.50 
Hamilton Precinct. 
' No. 8510 Rioh, W. O. B., est 






> €£=S£C£€S : *"*-*$^0=^€l=£fc4S'».i 



...f~>. ■; 



Survey of Farming Interests. 



National Goviernment that a ur- 
vey be made of the farming in- 
terest* of this county as to the 
past year's crops and the crops 
proposed for next year and la- 
bor needed for the same, and to 
that end I have mailed blanks 
to a number \ of patriotic and pub 
he spirited men in differentt parts 
of the county, asking them to fill 
out the same for the agricultur- 
alists in each vicinity, and return 
them to my office in Burlington 
not later than February 1st, 1918, 
so the summiary may go forth to 
the authorities at once. 

I understand the National Gov- 
ernment is trying to solve the 
labor problems for the farms for 
the next year. 

J. C GORDON, 
Superintendent County Schools. 



Why Patronize This Bank ? 

Because we render that personal service so much desir- 



Made Sergeants. 

Mr. and Mrs *J t E. Gainns arc in 
receipt of the following which is 
welcome news to thorn and the 
many friends of their son, Harold, 
who is at Camp Taylor: 
Hq. 326 Field Artillery, 
Camp Zachsry Taylor, Ky., Jan- 
uary 14th, 1918. 
Special Order No. 66 Extract, 
*• Upon the recommendation of 
their Battery Commander the fol- 
lowing appointments are hereby 
made in Battery «E" to fill orig- 
inal vacancies: 

To be Sargeant: Private Harold 
Gaines. 
To be Corporals: 
Private Evan E. Smith 
Private Raymond D. Daunt 
Private Chas. J Schaffieldy 
Private Walter G. Lauder man 
Private Thomas P. Likin. 
By order of Colonel McEntire. 
W. A Obenchain, Captain, 326th, 
F. D. Adjt; 



4.20 



H05 



7.63 
17.80 
10.90 



Of fuel necessarily pu 
behind tnii week in 
appearance. The same 
oocur every Honda v f >x> 
ttl and iaetadtag the 
.Match Th* Eseont 

thf •*»*»ulatf« 



*^> 



l§ went t:> 

here t!n\y 

Wert* not 

until 




in* receipt of card/*' < "«\ounc4ng the 
-tHjeipt of Chris/a a " d 'bseoo by 
*» boys "over/™'' ' 1W ' 

ha^ , ~ / Thrrc is t. . 

Iur * tther f«/\ °' •''x'^lingly 
toba^gjfo/tii" country nnd 
elfon )$ut( it c 



'Kt 



And He Popped Up the Price 

The oil supply man made his 
appearance in Burlington last Mon 
day, being his first trip here for 
many days, and the supply was 
reduced to a very' small quantity. 
He boosted the price one cent a 
gallon. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ e 

♦ ORANGE HALL. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



Russell Craddock will move to 
P. P. Neals farm, 

Omer Connely and family spent 
Sunday at J. M Stephens', 

Walter Craddock and wife arc* 
the parents of a fine baby girl. 

Mr. and Mrs Joe Green and<jVli« ft 
Cora Aylor spwnt Sunday at Paul 
Aylor's. 

Miss Alene Clements spent last 
Thursday night with Mise Mariet- 
ta Love. 

8. H Marshall returned from 
Jacksonville, Pla., last week, wher^ 
he has been at work for several 
month*, 

For Ront-The Joe Hiddeil farm 
on Gunpowder creek. See Mm Kio 
dell, Bellovluw. 



over the floor at, 
posaifrk has had * I 
msrket, bw it 
fteema to l>o (fearing now and the 
[outlook to vers uiurh improved 



Lost— Monday on the road be- 
tween Llmsbuig via Hebron, liul- 
iile to the McGlsssoa 
■ >. 7 Uidy'» overshoe* Fin- 
*■ ivUl please rrturn to Charles 
I, Hiirllriton \t l> 3. 



24 acres land 
Petersburg Precinct 
No. 2671 Rums, W. 8. 

lot in Petersburg ... 
No. 2672 Burns, Hubert 

lot in Petersburg. . . . 
No. 2728 Gordon, M. L., nr 

lot in Petersburg 

No. 2762 Hoffman, Charles 

lot in Petersburg. . . . 
No. 2790 Klopp, Frank, nr. 

50 acres land 14,60 

No. 2925 Tilley, Ralph C. 

lot in Petersburg 4.95 

Verona Precinct. 
No. 3427 McKenaie, W. E. 

80a land on Verona and 

Grant county road 1 1 .35 

No. 3429 Napier, Charley, nr 

2 acres land 9.25 

No. 8498 Vest, Mrs. Eliza 

60 acres land on Walton 

and Verona road ;!0.99 

No. :\'o21 Webster, Carl 

16 acres laud 24 .30 

Walton Precinct. 
No. 8774 Hopnertou, Joe 

lot in Walton 

No. 4219 Wilson, Roland 

lot— 1916 taxes, SS.10 
1917 taxes, 5.20 
Bo. 1049 Youell, Mrs. P. C. 

lot in Walton 

No. 4051 Berry, John icol) 

lot In Walton 

No. 4238 Brown, Steve (col) 

1916 taxes, 16.16 
" 4052 1917 taxes, 6.00, lot2 yrs 11.75 
No. 4077 Senour, Jennie, (col) 

lot in Walton 3.21 



L» 



ed by the man of small business and assist him to become a 
man of larger business. 

Because our service is just the kind appreciated by the 
large business man, as we can care for his notes and bonds, 
clip his coupons, collect and credit the" interest on his notes 
and assist him in making investments. 

You may not be in a position to have much banking busi- 
ness and yet desire to take advantage of some part of our ser- 
vice ; we ask you not to hesitate to let us know your needs. 

You are always welcome at this bank regardless of the 
size of your business. Call in and read our daily papers. 
We Pay Taxes and Interest on Depotitt. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 
W. L. B. ROUSE, Pres. A. B. RENAKER, Cashier. 



^®=^=^^&£=©-£3=€5 •OPOOOOO CK 



f€543^a^r 




15.30 



10.33 
13.20 



0.00 



The Tri-State Patron Says:- j 

"No Tbankt, Mr. Station Man, after cutting the feed-cleaning the stable* ' 
milking the cowa and running the separator, I will alto by my own rail- \ 
road ticket instead of paying you a FAT commit -ion. If there is anything 
easy about keepiug cowa, I want it myself." 

Every farmer should ship his cream DIRECT to the Creamery. 

55 Cents 

per pound for Butter Fat week beginning Jan. 21, 1918 

The Tri-State Butter Co. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

UNITED STATES FOQD ADMINISTRATION 
License No. G-18152 

25,000 of the largest producers have found the Tri-State always dependable 
and most profitable. Do not let the Station Buyer talk you out of your cream 
and make for himself a profit of about 2c per pound or more. Ship US your 
next can or if you need cans, We will tend them prepaid for 30 days trial 




5ls-C-ts^-^ 



-i-j-^i^S^-S^S- *&£* 



■^^^z£^^&^&m£\ 



NOTICE. 

Owing to the fact that a Gov- 
ernment ordrr requires the stores 
to close e v ery Monday at twelve 
o'clock noon, wo will receive cream ' 
on Tnvsday of each week instead j 
of Monday until further notice, in j 
order to make It more convenient 
for natrons who have shopping to 
to do. 

CLOVEKLEAP CREAMERY, 
Burlington, Ky. 



Subscribe for the Recorder. 
Only $1.50 the Year 

Read Our Advertisements and Profit By Them. 



j 



(C 



Burlington" 



( Having recolved many retraasta from 

I parties wanting me be tell t.lioir prop* 

I I hnvn Hpccial arranjrrmentH to take 
care of that toritory ; h*»ihI uie your 



WANTED-Man to tend tobacco dlNoriptlon of land" and number or 

find. Some neien, price*, number Of house! and 

No hhIuk no pa.v ; Ity pet 



earn land furnished, house and harms, etc. 

garden frcr», ami cow pnntur.' cini if nolU 

AddrcHH K n, Rice. Landing, G. B. POWERS, Salesman 

Equitable Hk, Itldg. Walton, Ky 



FOR SALE. 



Lost— Last *«*-k btween Hur- j 

llngton and Krlanger two Ford] 
automol U will I 

confer a favor !>v returning them Ithode Island K«d r«ls, 91,60 

lo ,T.<lui I Kiir-litigton »H IMi.ui. I <m 

,n»l Plorsnce pu ioui< Mm i M ROtlBK. 



For Sale-6 Good Farms 



rWkenholdt, farm. 103 acre* JW.Oou 
Pelsor farm, W acres. . . himi 

l.'MV acre farm k too 

Tim above farms have l)e.st of 
linprovomonta, lar«e bams and 
houses with modem Improvo- 
meuts. 

00 aoras good tobaoco land naai 

York villa M) 

W) acre farm, well Iowa ted t, um 

fio acre farm u-^ 

Also llixt elsHs (h.-eoilsle property 
idn.ua 
WAHItKN TKIil 
InniO • LawreaottUurg, 




L 



1 



BOONE COUNTY 



RECORDER 



H Week's J^cws 



Snow on top of snow and then 
BOHie more snow. 



Mm, R Sy Crisler was quite 
Several days tho past week, 



ill 



Zero weather and a scarcity of 
fuel make a very undesirable 
combination. 

Uncle Sam has demanded that 
millers return to tho manufacture 
ef pioneer flour. 

The infant of Lewis Beemon and 
wife, of Petersburg neighborhood 
haw pneumonia. 



Oaten Kelly, assistant Cashier of 
tho Boone County Deposit Hank, 
went homo last Saturday evening 
to visit his parents, his first trip 
home this year. 

Missas Gwendolyn Goodndge, Al 
berta Kelly and Agnesc Carver 
are considering attending tho 



Frankfort and Potsdam. ] FROM KENTUCKY EDITORS. 

lh?? a 'i^^' n L ry T haB -f r / :,dy taken This i8 one of the timer* when 
tho Kentucky Legislature across you havo to beg the, farmers to 
his lap and given it one of .those sell you sparerits, sausage and 
Wateraontan lambasting* peculiar- backbones, and then fish froundw 
ly of his own style, ft follows: your Hat pocketbook for the big- 
Opportunity, which knocks once gest piece of money to make a I 



THURSDAY JANUARY 21th. 1*18. 



srpmg term of tne Eastern Ken-; at the door and which if not ad- eettlement.-La Center Advance 



To replenish Ms stock of goods 
"W. L, Kirk pat rick sent a sled to 
tho city last Friday. 



tucky Normal School 

Hon. W. P, Cropper, Boone coun 
ty's representative in tho Legisla- 
ture, voted for the ratification of 
the Prohibition amendment to the 
national constitution. " 



After having been detained at I to mako merry and mirthful 



mitted passes on, neve* to return,! 

knocked at the door of the Ken-j AH this patriotic sock knitting! 
tucky Legislature Monday, ana, and sweater making' is right and 
heard, vanished forever. j patriotic but if it continues much 

And what an opportunity! Nev-' ,on S er under our humble vine and 
er before had a State Legislature fl ? .. tro °. we will run outof shingle 
such a chance to immortalize it- na " s and oa forced to anchor, 
self; never before such a chance ou J* britches with a twine string.' 



m 



home for a week by the bad j world overcast by the somberneee 
weather, Misses Kathryn Brown of travic travail, 
.and Margaret Hughes returned) Yet the 
Sunday, to the city to resume 
their work in the commercial 



Misses Agnes and Lillian Car- 
ver entertained several of their 
friends last Monday night. 



Dick Tannei-j of Hebron neigh- 
borhood, was transacting business 
in Burlington, last Monday. 



school. 



B. C, Gaines' little daughter, He( 
on Ruth, who was very ill a day 
or two ; last week has about rc-» 
covered. 

Lloyd Weaver, who resides down 
on Gunpowder, reports butchering 
a hog last week that yielded 25 
gallons of lard. 



The weather boss does not be- 
lieve in the conservation of the- 
beautiful ; otherwise why so much 
snow this winter. 



W. A, Gaines has gone to Flor- 
id* to spend the remainder of 
the winter. He does not expect to 
return before the first of April. 



Mrs. Addie Pope will have a sale 
of" personal property, livestock and 
farm implements Fob. 7th The 
advertisement appears in this 
iSHie. 



This winter has made a record 
that _;wilL_bo vividly remembered 
by the oldest inhabitant away 
along down tho dim vista of the 
future. 



some old inhabitant will bob 
and tell about the 1917-18 winter 
and many people will believe tra 
is lyinj 



George Sedler, the 'oldest river 
man at this point, says that the 
present ice gorge is the worst 
within his recollection | 58 years 
and predicts a serious time when 
the break comes. — Lawroncelmr-c 
Register. 

Marion Scott, of Rabbit Hash, 
brought several hogs to Burliug- 
ton on a sled last Tuesday morn 
iiig, from where they were ship- 
ped to the city in W. U, Kirk- 
patrick's truck. He must have 
started the day before, judging 
by tbo time he arrived in Bur- 
lington. * ' 

The town of Petersburg c. Ueci 
on local Fuel Administrator, Dr t5 
W. Duncan, Monday, for a car load 



Kentucky Legislature 
failed to see and seize its oppor- 
tunity, and will pass into obliv- 
ion, as other Legislatures that 
have preceded it have done. 
How different would have I; 

it had Opened thei 



is 



—Danville Messenger 

-♦- _>_ -»- .♦ 
I • "I" r 

"Ankles win a husWand" 
headline in Monday's Chattanooga 
Times, which, according to an 
editorial in that paper, seems to 
sustain the statement of a recent 
Bocial writer to the effect that 
the "time is here when a man 



The 



W. D Cropper was appointed 



deputy circuit co urt clerk last b at 
urday. Ho will take care of the 
office in the absence of Mr. 
Maurer. 

This part of the country is 
dreadfully short on heat so far 
this winter, while the liberality 
in dispensing zero weather has 
been unbounded. 



FKty or seventy-five years from 
now there will bo a very severe; it^a"""^" 1 wouia nave been rarely looks his sweetheart in the 
period of winter weather, . and | JB£*Jk i OpportunityTnocked- W"-=°Pkin.vme New Era, 

if "" J hl * WJM day on which it 
ratifi.-d the proposed constitution- 
al amendment for Nation-wide pro 
hibitian it b* also made a for- 
mal declaration of our inspiration 
and object in fighting the autoc- 
racy of Kaiserism. 

Tho Kentucky Legislature exists 
in our system of democratic gov- 
ernment as a representative body. 
As such it was elected and such it 
pretends to be. And yet its ac- 
tion in ratifying this amendment 
denies the people whom it as- 
sumes to represent any voice ' in 
the decision * of the issue of 
whether there shall be establish- 
*! ,8 reat national policy which 
would affect personally everyone 
of them. 

If three-fourthB of the State 
Legislatures ratify this amendment 
they will force prohibition upon 
the people of all the states wheth 

. ti t y Y'f h s or not - Exceot 

of coal. Ifshippod at once there- as .. a legislature is really represen 

quest was that it be sent (to Au- ! a Uv £ °, ™ e people cf its 'State 

rora, otherwise that it be sent to I tft3 ' P^P'f nave no part in the 

Erlanger. If sent in time to Au-|{? ing of tnis P°licy under which "What deductions are allowed a 

rora it can be hauled across the l ne y . f™ to live - Thei present 1 fa "mer for 'business expenses- in 

river on the ice. Dr Duncan | ~ cgl ^ tui>e .° f Kentucky waselect I making out his income-tax return? 

made requisition tor the coal at • . « - e "jo resolution for Ihei This is one oi/the many Hues-, 

submission of this amendment was 

passsd by Congress. There was 

no such issue in the cau, K ^ign 

made by the members of this 

Legislature. Not only have the peo 

plo of Kentucky never registered 

at the polls their will on Itha 



soldiers at Camp Zachary 
Taylor, who have come home on 
furloughs, brand as a lie the 
statements that they are not well 
fed and well elothe'd. All that! 
have come have gained in > flesh j 
and were wearing thick clothing,! 
made of the best material. Be- 
sides they all stated that they 
were well treated.— Adair County 
News. 

The present prices of whisky be 
ing prohibitive, we have abandon 
ed the use of strong drink and 
have taken up tobacco instead. 
Out of one bad habit intoanoth-t 
er, just like most all other people 
who inhabit- the earth. The only 
difference in ourselves and some 
people we know is we frankly tell 
the truth concerning the matter, 
while they do not.— Benton Tri- 
bunfe-Democrat. 

From "bureau of Internal Revenue 



The B, B, Hume Automobile Co.. Agents 

23-23-27 E. Fifth St, Covington, Ky. 
Agents for the following Automobiles* and Truck ' 
CHEVROLET, one man top, tire rack, demountable rim, 
a swell car. No hfll it will not climb, have sold 102 and 
hava contracted for 125 more. There is not a dissatisfied 
customer. 

Chevrolet Baby Grand. - . .$ 962. f. o. b. Factory 
Chevrolet Model 49 $ 6 71 f. o. b. Factory. 

HUMPMOBILE 1918 MODLE, 
Price $1425, F. O. B. Factory. 

PREMIER, with electric starter, $2250 f. o. b. Detroit 

REPUBLIC TRUCKS 

Modle 9, 3-4 Ton, $ 920. Modle 10, I Ton, $1230 Modle, I ! $15 1 8 
2 Ton Truck, $1940, 3} Ton Tmc^ $2830 1. o. b. 

FREE SERVICE— Hnpmoblle and Truck is each entitled to 50 hrs 
fj-ee service, and the Chevrolet, 40 hours/ 

All kind* of Auto Repair* done by the most competent men in Covington. 
A fall and complete stock of Auto Accessories. 



I REMOVAL- I 



once. 



Charlos Beall, of the Prancesvjlle 

neighborhood, was a business vis- 
itor to Burlington, Monday, and 
while in town renewed his alle-r- 



Postmaster Joel C. Clore, of Cin 
rinnati, was transacting business 
in the Boone county court, last 
Thursday. He came to Burlington 
by way of Hebron. 



iance to the Recorder for another , , 

year. He evidently expects to hav.>f ssu? . of Nation-wide prohibition, 

use for his anfnmnhiif. * nma *>™.> J h "t they have ne ver even regis- 

later in the year as he took homo n 

with him a tiro for his machine, 

being the first indication of the 

coming of spring noticed in these 

parts. 



Ground hog day is almost in 
sight. If it indicates six weeks 
more winter all hands and the 
cook would better pack their gripe 
and journey to some warmer 
clime. 



John W. Clore, of Hebron, ap- 
peared in the. county court, last 
Thursday, and was appointed ana 
qualified as administrator of the 
estate pf his deceased brother, 
Charles E. Clore. 



Work was done in every neigh- 
borhood in the county moving 
snow drifts from tho public roads 
in order that they might be used 
by the public. In many instances 
large numbers of men turned out 
with shovels, the drifts being so 
deep and the roads so narrow that 
snow plows could not bo used. 



of State 
wide prohibition. And yet before 
they can have a chance tovotei 
on State-wide prohibition— before 
they can even have a chance to 
vote indirectly on the issue of Na- 
tion-wide prohibition by the elec 
tion of a Legislature to act on 
it, this Legislature hastens to 
take snap action on them to set- 
tle the issue of Natioflriwide pro 
hibition in so far as Kentucky can 
settle i f , thus preventing the peo-4 
pie of Kentucky ever having any- 
thing to do with the decision 
of the matter. This is representa-, 



At some points the drifts were ; . 

nearly ten feet deep, and narrow | me government wicn a venge- 

passways were cut through them. I am ? e / _, 

It will require an immense amount U Bl i\ more and worse. The same 

of sunshine to put the present i r^ 8 dature which has fallen over 

crop of snow out of sight. 



Growers who arc prepared with 
stripping rooms had an opportun 



A "Tin Lizzie" can cut the mus- 
tard when the mercury is 15 to 20 
lielow zero, but when 'it has to *j<> 
up against snow that is *0 to 30 
inches deep it balks and has to 
for« taken to shelter. 

The enow was so dry that a 
very light wind drifted it and in 



itself to cast Kentucky's vote for 

Nation-wide prohibition now pro 

poses to submit to the voters of 

Kentucky a proposition for State 
past week to strip con-, £ ido . Prohibition Certainly if 
siderable tobacco. A good strip- ir entuckv 1S to have prohibition 
ping room is very necessary toa u y ot f r8 * thp . stat * alone 
quick preparation for market, and i „ ho . u ) d h ? V * the r J ?ht to order lt ' 
it is strange that more growers I , But in what ?*? do?s the Le-gis- 
do not provide their tobacco barns : ature recognize this authority of 
with safe, comfortable stripmrie -j voter8 in submitting the stato 
departments, when they can do Wld ? amenrf rne»t after having al-, 

so at* a very -reasonable cost. ' if. _/» ratlficd tho national amend,; the revenue officer who will visit 
The matt e r of c omfort atrrmv Is 
an item that makes a 



tions which revenue officers who 
will visit every county in the 
United States during January and 
February will answer in detail. 
Briefly, they include the prepar- 
ation of land for crops . and) in 
tho cultivation, harvesting ana 
marketing of the .crop. Deduce 
tions may be made for the cost 
of seed and fertilizer, the amount 
expended for labor in caring for 
live stock, cost of feed, repairs 
to farm and other farm buildings, 
but not the cost of repairs sto the 
dwelling. The cost of repairs to 
farm fences and machinery is de*- 
ductible, as well as the cost of 
small tools and material which 
are used up in the course of a 
year or two, such as binding twine 
pitchforks, spades, etc! 

The cost of machinery, «uch as 
tractors and threshing machines^ 
can not be deducted, but the coat I 
of their operation is a deductible 
item. 

The value of farm products is 
not considered taxable until reduc 
ed to cash or its evquivanent, If 
crops and stocks were produced in 
1916 and Bold in 1917, the amount 
received therefor is to be in-« 
eluded in the farmer's tax re- 
turn for the calendar year 0? 
1917, Crops produced in 1917 and 
on hand December 31 need not be 
considered. ft Persons in doubt 
to any of the provisions of the 
income tax section of the war- 
revenue act are advised- by-the 
Pureau of Internal Revenue to see 



Atlas Auto Top Company 

Now at 15 East Seventh St., COVINGTON, KY. 

Tops, Seat Covers, Curtains, Ford Seats $4.75 up. 

rYrite. Phone or Call. — pho^ 3. 3837. 




No Advance. 

We have purchased a dealers entire stock of Hardware, 
Leather, Etc.', which enables us to take care of your 
wants in repairing 0$ harness at old prices. We also 
have a 60 per cent Weatsfoot Jet Black 



O i l, at per gallon 

New and Second Harness at All Pil&s—.. 
It will pay you to visit us and get i)ur prices. 

Thomann Harness Store 

S - 3 018 112 Kke St, Covington, Ky. 



K. 



.rnsnt? 



their county to assis t taxpayers in 



stripping 1Jecaust ; a majority of the vot- making out their returns, which 
r- * -*jer8 might decide at the polls that | must l>e filed on or beforeMarch 



room almost indispensable. 

«». ... j Kentucky should have prohibition 1, 1 f>18 

Private L. T Utz writes the Re-' wou ' a not at all demonstrate tint 
corder : - , they would be willing to denv the 



"Please change mv address from ; voters oi New York or Massachu- 



Three wagons went to Erlanger 
last Saturday and secured small 
loads of coal which were brought 
to Burlington and divided among 
several persons whose supply was 
Just about exhausted. 

The Kentucky Legislature has 
ratified the proposed prohibition 
Amendment to the national con- 
stitution, frnaking Kentuckv the 
eecond State to ratify it, Missis- 
sippi being the first. 

When tho weather becomes fav 
©Table tobaceo will move 
er before in this county 
grower 8 will want to ge* 
♦don of those fat checks 
will secure for them, and who 
wouldn't? 

There is not much being said 
about the 1918 crop of tobacco, 



Resolutions of Respect. 
Whereas, our Heavenly father in 
! n infinite wisdom, h^s 1 seen fit 
call from our midst one of Pur 
beloved friends and co-workers in 
here to the officer "training *"*? * oti W forc(i " prohibition on ! ^f,A Ld Society of the Methodist 
school. Our camp 7s twentv-tw^ th ~ 11cop!o of Ninv York orM.u-1 p^nrSV ^'.^l ^ 
rniles c*ut of San .'Antonio? and"n! ?^»«» -^ J! ** *&£* i We^fom^^f'^gfe 




The 
Woman's Favorite 

Women bear their hill share of 
the Hairy work. Anything that 
will make their tasks easier de. 
serves a cordial welcome. A 
woman can turn 

THE NEW 

SHARPLES 

SUCTION-PUD 

Separator slow- I 
ly and yet get 
mil tho cremm. I 
Any other 
ccparator I 
wi:i I j io cream 
when turned 1 
be low speed. 




D. E. Castleman, 
AITQRXE Y J. TLA W t 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucky 




Yo ti have 

or.Iy to tilt a 

fl pail of milk 

into the large, low supply tank. 

9 The simplo tubular liowl is very 

easy to clean — onj/ three pints, no 

Bfijssv dib.-s to -ivn-Ji. Cnmoio and \rt 
oa s1'v».n >uu <:t, 11: it works. 

S QUIGLEY C BEEMON, 

a Limaburg, Ky. 



IF YOU WANT A 

CREAM SEPARATOR 

— GIV E MUX CA LU. II- 




Jected it in their own elections. 1 rifl i, v , H 

Moreover if a majority of the- n ^)Tl ™, K 

people of Kentuckv should sav bv A f H q' . T . hat . in ^\ death the 

their yo^es on this amendment ^^^ ha « ,0 »- - on r of lt9 
which the. Legislature is going | moat uorth y and efnc.ent mem- 
to submit to them that they are «,?•,, rn U t *. • .. . 

oppos-d to State-widep rohibitlon I ,,-S 1 " ,' ^ a t } h H c ? mmun » t y, jn 
what would their decision amount i uil ,^ \ h V\ th ° ,a l ter h . aifof 
Thr- decision has been takeu '< „ er . ll \f' ha9 J^ st °"f who always 
Boone county's second Increment ' out of thoir hands b .v the very i 5*l*Jif 1 !L l " fluence ' for . ?°.? d ancf 

a sympathet- 



a \-ery good location. Thev claim 
they ai-e having their "coldest 
weather in the last 20 years nnd 
there is a light snow "on the 
ground." 

Walton Rice, son of Mr. and Mrs 
Ezekiel Rice, of the Waterloo . 
neighborhood, and who was oneof| to l 



returned home last' Saturday from , th - m . *£ S° through the form of , nei5rhbora . 

Hattiesburg. Mississippi, where he l n .f l?„ ct ^_.°?. J. h ^f ub i ect ;.. E ^ l ;> | ic fnd fflpful friend 




the 
si'bly 



__* — 



BBF!HH1Hfl 



RILEY & RILEY 

AITORNBYS-AT LAW, 
and REAL ESTATE. 

BOKLINQTON, KY. 

Edgar C. Riley will be in Burling- 
ton every Monday and Friday. 



I handle the United States, a 
first-class Separator. Old Sepa- 
tors taken in trade. 

Thos. Rice. 

Burlington, - Ky. 

sept 28- tf 



DR. T. E. RANDALL 

of Pftersbnry, 

VETENARIAN 



comr> back home. So anxious w.iit prohibition and for giving 



he to remain that he was. given 

three rigid examinations but f.ti'- 

ed each time and was handed his 

. discharge. He was in the hospital 

$?* . 1 :_. 18 , natu^a, . t° .SUPPOSE, that 1 several times because of his feel 



States the 



FOR SALE 



the very high price for which the 
1317 crop was sold will stimulate 
tho growers to make an effort for 
as largo a crop as it is posi 
for them to handle. 



It will be a pleasure to the 
rjumberous friends of fJeo. lv Mc- 
Glasson, of Bu!l:ttsvi!l.\ to hear 
that ho is well on the road to 
recovery from a recent very se- 
vere case of pneumonia. For sov 
tvr&\ days all were much alarmed 
because of his condition. 



Numerous cases of smallpox are 
reported in the cities. It is un- 



to the ls D0W ready to answer calls day 
things] or night. Charges reasonable. 
ohcr' ""'•. '"' wammu to tne Tamily j 
power to force it' on : ?" r „ d^post sympathy in this their, 
the people of Kentuckv against ™ " ,p* . so " '°* . :l » c point them: 
I], .if W iii | for comfort to that loving Christ 

Looking alonr* to the Capitol at } vh ° "aid : "Whosoever livelh and! All kinds of farms in Kentucky, 
Frankfort— to th- bigots who sac- ^'^th In me shall never die." | Ohio and Indiana. I have all the 
rifico democracy to -fanaticism ; toi , F "J' thpr R«»oIved, That a cop/ bargains. See me at the Erlanger 
thr> hvpociitcs' who sacrifice de- ? f tliese resolutions lx> sent to the 
mocracy to expediencv; to the' l a „ y of „ deceased, one to 
Some arc inclined to eharce th - Ramestcrs and gangsters who sac ! * "? ^°"f c <\™*y Recorder, and 
war entirMy with the fueJ %o!C \ ^ieo democracy to partisan dem or * 5L.^ IC(h1 ,n thp """utes, of 
age that is givin? this pari Of!?? *?' to factional trickery. to 



Kiving out, and tried vo overcome 
the trouble but in vain. 



Deposit Bank, 
sep l;l 



Win. E. BAIRD, 
Erlanger. Ky. 



wire i 



the country so much trouble. Of personal log(-rolling and 

course the war is in some meas- pnlling-nean there be but one 

ure responsible but the protracted a,llsw,v '' to the disgusted query of 



intensely cold weather is large!) 
the cause. There, have been other 
winters when there was a coat 
shortage that was very annoying 
and tho country was not at war. 
bjnt this winter the principal 
source of supply from the coal 
fields, the Ohio river has been 
closed for many 



the real Democrat . rt Ts there any * 
mon> democracy at Frank-oil than 
there is at Pdtsdam?Jfc*» - 



Burning Roots Out of Ground. 



Mrs. 

M iss Sallie 








Miller, President 

ilton", Secty. 

'Ivin Moore 

Committee. 



&Some have a*kod the question 

— H n . ilt ll the P rcsp * t legislature rat- 

iiies the prohibition amendment} 

to the federal constitution then 

I here would be no need or the 

In (wooded locdities, farmer ;. ' s;nn .. i„ )( i 



GEO. B. POWERS 

Real Estate Agent, 

Fireiand Life Insurance 

WALTON, KY. 

H<ii«l for tn>£«t of property fir »hI*>. Glv« 
ty if yon wnrtt to »t>U. 
llnalou Low. 



who wish to remove Hi 



_y passing the 
"?,,«"* whereby ti.e peojje 



enabling 




Women! 



Here is a message to 
suffering women, from 
Mrs. W. T. Price, of 
Public, Ky.: "I suf- 
fered with painful...", 
she writes. "I got down 
with a weakness in my 
"back and limbs... r 
felt helpless and dis- 
couraged. . .I had about 
given up hope3 of ever 
being well asain, when 
a friend Insisted I 

Take 







r Sale. 



mill- 

l*(U v - 



nece the planting of twstvt* 

ion sera* in the Rio 1 1 

d«| sect-hiii. This Is «u in 

l«w thousand aeros over i 

■gmol last year.-Ksrm nod Family 



conditions, U mm ■ .,,i\ r-i^t can itump the! i 

i.rrur b) roursa r»l thai itwam 
Meh communiritcs dlrei t wUhlfrom t 1 



draft 



not it* 



1 flrtd* fi- « |,i,.|, the r.iH 

>i of ti„. 

v larjfe 



pi n 
l>ee|ui 

•«•>>• lit 



Ihe fl. I- bm .mi ; hrUklv, ii ■, 
I'Spular 8elt*nce M nosuh 



It han f| 



ltd 


6-r«i 

tMU' 


ds 


bug 




Mhl 




tf I 


>VR 




»c 


iU 1 


hi* 





hMktii. M 

oinl iitlior 1 

MrviHl tuv«ry ■until t»«ii 

fOHoi f<»f *»" 

iitrstleas iu«*mu» lata su 

Anii 

a aruaa dald fvr im\ 






The Woman's Tonic 

I began Carduf. In 
a short while I saw a 
marked difference... 
I grew stronger right 
along, and It cured ne. 
1 am stouter than I 
have bean la years." 
Jf you suffer, you can 
appreciate what It 
moons to be strong and 
wall Thousands of wo- 
man five Cardul the 
credit fur their good 
health. It should hslp 

J oil Try Cardul. At all 
nifldsta, e-73 



Take Your 



1 



: mmmKk\%%m\\\\\t\\m 1 : 1 1 HHH i 



sm 



1 



THURSDAY JANUARY 24th, 1918. 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 




> 



GIVING MILK TO DAIRY CALF 

JGueeswork In Apportionment Is Ex- 
pensive In More Ways Than One 
—Good Rule Is Given. 

"Guesswork in apportioning milk 
[to the dairy calf is expensive both 
tfrom the fact that irregular amounts 
joften cause digestive troubles and be- 
fcauFe more milk than necessary Is fre- 
iqnently fed." This statement is quoted 
ifrom Circular No. 202, published by 
jthe Illinois Experiment station. Ur- 
|bana, 111. v 

A general rule is to feed one pound 
iof whole or skimmed milk to each 
[eight pounds of live weight, rarely 
;feeding in excess of 12 pounds of 
(either. The schedule of feeding used 
)by the Illinois station calls for four 




HANDLING MILK IN WINTER 



Many Farmers Relax Vigilance 
Cold Weather and Low Grade 
of Milk Is Produced. 



ta 




Many farmers who pay strict atten- 
tion to the correct handling of their 
milk and cream during the hot weath- 
er relax their vigilance during the win- 
ter. The result is that good milk Is 
produced during thnt part of the year 
when good milk is difficult to produce^ 
and a low grade of milk when it la 
nalurally easy to produce good. Too 
a in eh dependence should not be placed 
on the natural coolness of the atmos- 
phere, for the chances are that this 
will not suffice. It Is a noted fact that 
Uuriug the fall and early winter pur- 
chasers of milk often' find it more dif- 
ficult to keep the product from getting 
sour than they do during the hot 
weather. 

Milk should be cooled to at least DO 
degrees F. immediately upon being 
drawn from the can and kept at that 
temperature until used. If the ordi- 
nary coolness of the atmosphere Is de- 
pended upon for this, it may be hours 
before the milk reaches the required 
temperature, and in the meantime mi- 
crobes hnve been multiplying which in 
a short time will render the milk unfit 
for use. To produce first-class milk 
the same care is demanded In the whi- 
ter months as during the summer, 
cleanliness and a correct temperature 
being of cardinal Importance at all 
times. 



GIVE SORE TEATS ATTENTION 




GOOD 
ROADS 

PROPER WIDTH OF HIGHWAYS 



ROAD BUILDING LARGE TASK 

President of National Highways Asso- 
ciation Telia Hew a Great Sys- 
tem Can Be Built 



% 



Splendid Dairy Type. 

ids of whole milk to a Jersey calf 
first two days ; six to eight pounds 
no third to twenty-eighth day ; 
three to four pounds of both skim 
milk and whole milk from twenty- 
eighth to thirty-fifth day; eight to ten 
pounds skim milk from thirty-fifth to 
fifty-sixth day, and ten to twelve 
pounds from fifty-sixth to ninety-first 
day. A holstein calf Is given some- 
what more milk at a younger age, 
though rarely does the total fed go 
above 12 pounds. 





Proper growth of calves 

tPutzliny Question to Gray Heads in 

Calf Business— Much Depends 

on Ration Furnished. 

- How -fast -should my calves grow? 
la a puzzling question even tp gray 
beads In the calf -raising business. This 
will depend to a large extent on the 
kind of ration fed, but in order for any 
ration to be considered a definite suc- 
cess the calves should show a gain of 
at least a pound a day each day for 
{the first six months. Many ordinary 
jdnirymen are getting a pound and c 
jhalf gain daily. 

In Jtieight these rjsame calves should 
hftrease from one and one-half to two 
baches per month for the first half year. 
The height and weight have a definite 
relation for average sized calves dur- 
ing this first period. After six months 
this relation gradually changes and the 
weight outstrips the height. At one 
month of age a normal calf of any 
breed weighs, approximately three 
pounds for each inch In height, but at 
the end of the six months' period the 

eight has Increased to six and one- 
[kalf pounds for each inch in height. 
[From that time on there is a continued 
(widening in the relation of weight to 
eight until maturity. 



IBUTTER MAKER SHOULD KNOW 

Muct Handle Cream and Churn In 
8uch Manner That He Will Make 
" Best Quality of Butter. 

The farm butter maker should 
know how to handle his cream and 
churn In socage manner that be will 
bake the best quality of butter from 
It. The cream nxist be ripened even- 
ly and then churned at the proper 
temperature. If too warm. the butter 
jrill come quickly, but will not be 
{firm and granular. If too cold It 
prill take longer to churn. Generally 
Churning will require from 80 to 35 
intimites when cream Is at the proper 
(temperature. 

Ittftft&L CHURN IS EXCELLENT 



{faarmlta Concussion of -Cream Against 
Side* Separating Fat Globules- 
It It Beat Way. / 

haj bean found that tpf typo of 

WtHOM^MtM vt th« 
JfEOM Cliurti 
WW » l» 

'iny-aaay-br 
PJjMpssV asaaspla aa sMs t y p** 



Where Trouble Results From Improp- 
er Milking Ointment 1 Made, of 

Zinc and Vaaellne. J 

When cows ha v# -lore teats caused 
by Improper milking, applying an oint- 
ment maue fro^ 1 dram of oxide of 
zinc and u wftnee of vaseline applied 
when th* s orenooD in fi r st appa re n t' ' 
will probably be sufficient If the teats 
^tyio&lclSut in pimples which form scabs 
it is In all probability a case of cow 
pox, in which case the affected cows 
should be Isolated from the remainder 
of the herd and due precaution taken 
to prevent the spread of the disease, 
which is very contagious and can be 
carried to other cows In the herd on 
the hands or clothes of the milker. 
Treatment consists in applying, three 
times a day, an ointment made by mix- 
ing together 4 drams of boradc arid, 
20 drops of carbolic acid. 



Thanks to the pushful, pervasive 
metor car, American road building has 
"got a move on" at hist. There is ev- 
erywhere the cry for roads. The draw- 
back has been that, as yet, there has 
been no co-ordination of these multi- 
tudinous enterprises. The president 
of the National Highways association. 
Charles Henry Davis, in a recent paper 
stated that we spent last year $249,- 
955,967, or more than two-thirds the 
total of money expended so far on the 
construction of the Panama canal — 
for road improvements throughout the 
country. Mr. Davis' contention is that 
good roads, roads that run for thou- 
sands of miles through state after 
state, are, properly, not the responsi- 
bility of the state, but of the nation. 
He would have the federal government 
build a system of national roads join- 
ing the West with the Bast, the North 
and the South, connecting every part 
of the country, as is the case with t he 
national highways of Europe, and K as 
history shows, such as was the essen- 
tial equipment of every first-class 
power of the past, according to the 
Boston Evening Transcript. 

How.MWiI.1 aucB^Mi enormous 'con- 
struction be paid for uhd fedpt up? 

"Suppose," asks this eminent engi- 
neer, "the government built 100,000 
miles of properly planned roads, and 
at the same time purchased, say, 300 



Writer Advocates Narrower Roads and 

Restoring Acres of Valuable 

Land to Farming. 

Just at this time many are inter- 
ested in the question, how wide should 
our public roads be? A number of 
things should be considered in an- 
swering this question, says a writer 
in Utah Farmer. The kind of mate- 
rial to be used in making tlfe road. 
The topographical conditions through 
which the road will puss, the proper 
drainnge of the road. The special use 
to which the road may be put, if any. 

For years very little attention has 
been given to the wastefof land in our 
road building. Land has been cheap 
and plentiful and years ago we did not 



Dibowski's Cafe 




THAT- 



8 
I 



Neat Little Place 

For Farmer, Workman, Merchant, Clerk ' 

and Professional Man- 
Commercial Luncheon from 11 a m. to 1:30 p. 



m. 



Supper 5 to 7 p. m. 

No. 6 Piko Streat, - • Covlngton,Kantuo ky. 




;better sight 

Makes the world brighter. Many peo- 
ple go through life with poor vision, 
with only a few dollars would make 
them see perfectly. Don't do it — it 
pays to take care of your eyes. 
Phone South 1746 

t\t\ «t T7I T^T^TkTTkT WITH MOTCH, Jmnw 

UK. JM. r . irHjJN JN,6i3 Madison Ave. - Covington, Ky 




WORD FOR BROWN SWISS COW 



Animals Are Remarkably Strong, 

Healthy and Larger, and Coarser 

Than Other Dairy Breads. 

Brown Swiss cattle, as the name in- 
dicates, originated in Switzerland. 
They are remarkably strong, healthy 
animals, larger and coarser than any 
other dairy breed. While many Indi- 
viduals have made excellent dairy and 





Good Road Needed. 

feet of land on either side? This land 
would so continually increase iu value 
and in demand for leasing on long 
rental, that the cost of the road and 
the land purchase would soon be paid. 
A rentalrate of $6.66 per acre would 
} pay 'the interest on the cost of con- 
struction. But such would rent at vast- 
ly higher rates in cities and towns, 
high enough to give the nation an in- 
come equal to Its total annual expend!-, 
tures, from these national highways 
alone 1" 



G^oj Road in West 



uive the attention to proper road 
building as we do now. _ 

Public roads have been of a uniform 
width of 66 feet and the by-roads about 
40 feet. They have been too wide ff 
we were to Judge by the condition In 
which we find many of them. Wasted 
land on either side Is used only to 
grow weeds. 

Why not make them the width that 
is used nud p l uut t i' eeB Oh either 'slde 
as we have advocated in these col- 
umns before? Then the thousands of 
acres of land that are now practically 
wasted could be put to some good 
use. 

Some of the Eastern railroads are 
teaching us, a lesson In this regard 
for they are farming their right-of- 
way. On a recent trip East I saw 
great long stretches of land on either 
side of the railroad track planted to 
alfalfa. Acres were planted to truck 
gardening. I understand similar con- 
ditions are to be found In some parts 
of California. 

For the sake of economy In building 
and upkeep let's build our roads more 
narrow. Restore the acres of valuable 
land to farming. Build scientifically 
constructed roads the proper width 
and plant trees on both sides. 



KEEPING UP COUNTRY ROADS 



— - - .,-. . — ^— — — 


* j 


C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Maimer and Funeral Director 




WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 
Consolidated Phone 35. Farmers Phono. 



PHILIP TALIAFERRO 



Undertaker & Embalmer 



Magnificent Horae Drawn 

or 

Automobile Equipment 

Calls Answered Promptly in Auto at all Hours. 



Luxurant Ambulance 

at 

Your Command 



Phojnks 



DAY- EIU.ANGKR 87 

62 



Inight- 
ERLANGER, 



KY, 



Champion Brown Swiss Cow. 

milk records, the total number of the 
breed in this country is small and it 
has not, therefore, been as Important 
a factor in the dairy industries here 
as it has been In Switzerland. The 
number of animals Is rapidly Increas- 
ing, and the breed is receiving more 
attention from dairymen. 



CREAM THIEVES ARE FOUND 



Minnesota Official Finds That 44 

Farmers In Nine Associations Have 

Defective Machines. 

"Have you a cream thief on your 
farm?" is a pertinent question at the 
head of a circular being sent out by 
W. A. Mc^errow of the agricultural 
extension division of the University 
of Minnesota. 

In answer to the question, Mr. Me- 
Kerrow says that 44 farmers hi 9 
cow-testing associations In Minnesrfa' 
did h a v e- c r ea m thiev es , o r separate « 
that waste butterfat. Out of 170 s/p- 
arators tested it was found that /one 
In five was stealing from its owner. 

To prove up on your separata), It Is 
suggested that yon take a sample at 
your skim milk from the spo.tt and 
have it tested at your creamery or 
at the college of agriculture. There 
Is no possible eicnse^.^^. y sep- 
arator losses. ,>" aM?r llK ! x 



SAVE I 1 * "' Ml *- B »*» Kiddelfc 

»• about >inrlinsj ton arl^ 

ix-Hitineing tnl. 



about>" , urlinjfton a 
. ,1 of cartbeo'i'-touneing tl 
« ,V V of Chrls/<<« ")i«haceo » 
Jys ^ver/x"^ 




GOOD HIGHWAYS IN ONTARIO 



Approximately 55,000 Miles of Road 

In Province— 43,000 Miles in 

Fairly Good Condition. 

The province of Ontario has ap- 
proximately 55,000 mil os of road. 
More than \ 43,000 miles have been 
treated anbj are in fairly good condi- 
tion. About 20,000 miles are well- 
graded earth roads; about 3,000 miles 
are surfaced with broken stone and 
about 10,000 are surfaced with gravel. 
In the city of Toronto there is one 
motorcar to every twenty-five Inhab- 
itants. 



INCREASED VALUE OF FARMS 



Influence of Road Improvement on Ru- 
ral Property Is Described by Bal- 
j tlmore Financier. 

The Influence of road Improvements 
on .the value of rural property was de- 
scribed In a letter recently sent to the 
Manufacturers' Record by the president 
of the Baltimore Commercial bank, 
who wrote : "Around my home town iu 
Virginia property could be bought 
three years ago for $00 to $80 an acre. 
We pnt a fine road several miles 
through that county, and today you 
cannot buy anything for less than $100, 
and some la held at 1150 per acre." 



tug tro« 
la Quanta 

ttttt ts 



riici 

of uxemttiing 

th«* floor 
Iimh had 
tiarket, bttl > 
« .•ItNiring now HijutUtf 
union Improved 



jtt 



Nat-Work of Good Roads. 
Thla whole country will Home of 
these days be a net-work of good 
roads, which wilt have a place on the 
maps along with the railroads. The 
Lincoln highway linking tin* Bast and 
the Wast, the Jefferson highwuy, link- 
tig the lakes and the gulf, and the 
lHxIs Overland highway, are a begin- 



flsnsna^lsallsi A««^ ^*.»^* 

^rwWP»^pWTwi ^piF^Pw fWilP* 1 

'lUtwasn the years 1800 and 11114. 
eta sttrfarvd tUMH utiles of state 



Whether or Not Farmer Lives on Pub- 
lic Highway He Should Take In- 
terest in Nearest One. 

Every farmer should feel -hfcr de- 
pendence upon good roads. Whether 
or not one lives on a public highway 
he should take an interest in the near- 
est one to his farm or the road he 
must use to market his farm, orchard 
and garden products. 

There are many times when a day's 
work can be spared for the road. Aft- 
er heavy rains the road may need cer- 
tain repairs or improvements when the 
overseer Is not ready to call out the 
hands. Why not lwHvidual farmers 
donate a day's work on the road at 
such time? 

By keeping a road drag and drag- 
ging the road along one's land after 
heavy rains the road may be greatly 
Improved. It is an easy matter to have 
an agreement so each farmer will drag 
the road In front of his farm. This 
would maintain the road till the regu- 
lar hands could be called out at stated 
intervals or till the commissioner could 
make tho repairs. 

The time has come when we must 
consider the roads an asset, indis- 
pensable to the well-being of the farm- 
er and his family. This being true, Is 
it not every man's duty to do all he 
can to keep the roads in good condi- 
tion? 



THE TROTTING STALLION 

ST. ALPHONSUS 2:24; 

By CHARLEY HERR, the iron horse 
of the grand circuit 

Will make a season at Er- 
langer Fatr^Grounds in 1918. 
$20.00 to insure a living foal. 
Get your mares booked early. 
M. ROGERS, Owner. J. F. RAFFERTY, Agent. 




*1 



GOOD ROADS IN CONNECTICUT 



Concrete Highways Being Built In 
Twenty-Two Cities and Towns- 
Cost $15,000 a Mile. 



The construction of concrete high- 
ways Is going on In 22 cities and towns 
in Connecticut, and when these con^ 
tracts have been completed there will 
be about 70 miles of concrete-surfaced 
pavement In that state. The highways 
are 18 feet wide and cost $15,000 a 
mile. The longest single street of con- 
crete road In Connecticut Is two miles 
In Cheshire, on the main highway 
from Plalnvllle to New Haven. 



Good Roads. 
Any neighborhood that does not 
have enough enterprise to keep two 
or three log road drags going for a 
couple of weeks during the lute fall, Is 
sadly behind tho times. Farmers who 
are too lir/y to do (Ids ought to be 
compelled to drug thuur weary lcga 
through i iif mini to town uext spring 
- im they surely will. 



■tat Results for Dragging. 
The beat results from drngjtnc are 
•bullied only ky repeated applica- 
tion 



J. t. HAMILTON 

UNDERTAKER 

Verona. - - Kentucky. 

All of the Up-to-Dato methods and 
rcesonable charges. Fine line 
of Monument Work. 
Telephone— Calls answered prompt- 
ly* day or night. 



Phone South 871. 

J. W. RUSSELL BRADFORD 
• Attorn ey-aT-Law, 
502-501 Coppin Bldg. Covington, Ky". 
Will practice in all the courts. 

With O. M. Rogers 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

^SDBNTIST«&# 

Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



NOTjCEOFiDISSgLyTION 

Notico is hereby given thaV'tho 
Big Jlono Springs Hotel and Wa- 
ter Company, Incorporated, is clos- 
ing its business and winding up its 
affairs. 

C. L..BONIFIEIjD, President. 

T. A. Noi*an, Secretary. 



I Can Sell The Earth. 

List your farm with me. Give me 
a trial— just write description and 
number of acres and mail it to 

Wm, E. BAIRD, Erlanger, Kv. 
Erlanger Deposit Bank Bldg. sl8 

DR. W. E. FISTER, 

Veterinarian, 

WALTON, KY. 

Calls by telephone answered. night 
onlay. Thou© j|9, 



4 ■ **!**•<»« . 
Another thing to remember Is that 
a 25-cent package of tobacco will not 
last a soldier any longer than It will 
a civilian suiokor. 



Throe-cettt pgltflfs seems e»»»y, • 
l>«r»Hl to the Hire* or four hundred i>ir 
rent Increase In the rwet of tome oth- 
er necessities. 



Tak 



COAL 

The Famous 
Raymond City Coal 

Once Tried Alwas Used, 
Is Kept on hand constan- . 

Prices the Lowest 

Give Us Your Coal Order. 

Ox Brand Fertilizer, made 
by Tennessee Chemical Co. 
We handle all grades. 

Petersburg Coal Co 

Petersburg, Ky. 



f . W. Wan & Sod, 

(RiNITB 1 MARBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large Stock on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipment 

118 Main Street, 

AUROBA, IND. 

Executor's Notice. 

All persons indebted to tho ontato 
of E. T. KrutJS, dei-naned. iiuiHt come 
Forward and nettle wuiie, thoso hav- 
Ing cialuiH HKiihiHt Httld «>Hlnte must 
pi(*K( nt them to the undersigned 
proven according to law. 

Mth. C. K. KHI'TK, Kxeeutrlx. 
KIU\v A HI ley. Attys. 



Boone Co. farms Wanted. 



I 



tint < 



■ 



ur farms largv 
wlthMtu*. and | 

J. W. TAI.IKKRRD, 
Erlanger, 



tall 



bHHHBBhHHbBH&^HBH 



- 



Ll 






- m 



BOONE Cv.aNTY RECORDER 




.*» 



AMERICAN SUGAR 
SENT' TD_FRAB@CE 

American Price Rigidly Regulated 

by United States Food 

Administration. 



CONSUMERS" HERE PAY 9c. 



Sugar Cost 35 Cente a Pound During 

Civil War—Refiners' ProfiU 

Now Curtailed. 




Sugar Is selling today throughout 
America at from 8V4 to 9 cents a 
pound to the consumer, even though 
there Is a world shortage which 1ms 
reduced this nation's sugar allotment 
to 70 per cent, of normal. 

Through the efforts of the—United 
States food administration the sugar 
market has been regulated as far as 
the- prod uce r y refiner an d- wholesa ler 
Is concerned. The food administration 
ho* no power to regulate retail prices 
except by public opinion. Even though 
more than 85,000 tons of sugar have 
been shipped to Prance in the last 
four months the retail grocer's sugar 
price ts around 8 to 8V4 cents. He 
should* sell this sugar at 8% to 9 
gd administration believes, 
American housewife to 
•ian this amount 
jshen the food admin- 
istration was organized the price of 
sugar rose suddenly to 11 cents a 
pound. During the Civil War sugar 
cost the consumer 35 cents a found. 
By regulation of the sugar market and 
redwing the price to Bhi and 9 cents 
and keeping it from advancing to 20 
cents the food administration has sav- 
ed the American public at least $180,- 
000,000 in four mouths, according to 
a statement made by Ilerbcrt Hoover 
the other day. 

"It is our s tern duty to feed the al- 
TTeST to maintain their lieu tin and 
strength at any cost to ourselves," 
Mr. Hoover declared. "There has not 
been," nor will be us we see it, enough 
sugar for even their present meagre 
and depressing ration unless they seud 
ships to remote markets for it. If wo 
in our greed afid gluttony force them 
either to further reduce, their ration 
or to send these ships we will havo 
done damage to our abilities to win 
thi» war. 

"If we send the ships to Java 
for 250,000 tons of sugar next year 
we will have necessitated the em- 
ployment of eleven extra ships for 
one year. These ships — if used In 
transporting troops— would take 
150,000 to 200,000 men to France." 

Reason for World Shortage. 

As Mr. Hoover pointed out, the 
United States, Canada and England 
were sugar importing countries before 
the war, while France and Italy were 
very nearly self supporting. The main 
sources of the world's sugar supply 
was Germany and neighboring powers, 
the West Indies and the East Indies. 

German sugar Is no longer available, 
as ft la used entirely In Germany, 
which also absorbs sugar of surround- 
ing countries. 



England can no longer buy 1,400.000 
long tons of sugar each year from 
Germany. The French sugar produc- 
tion has dropped from 750,000 to 210,- 

000 tons. The Italian production has 
fallen from 210,000 tons to 75,000 tons. 
Thus three countries were thrown 
upon East and West Indian sources 
for 1,925,000 tons annually to maintain 
their normal consumption. 

Because of the world's shipping 
shortage the allied nations started 
drawing on the West Indies for sugar ; 
East Indian sugar took three times 
the number of ships, since the dis- 
tance was three times as great. Sud- 
denly the west was called on to fur- 
nish and did furnish l,420,0ft0 tons of 
sugar to Europe when 300,000 tons a 
year was the pre-war demand. The 
allies had drawn from Java 400,000 
tons before the shipping situation be- 
came acute. 

"In spite of these shipments," Mr. 
Hoover stated the other day, "the 
English government In August reduced 
; the household sugar ration to a basis 
of 24 pounds per annum per capita. 
And in September the French govern- 
ment reduced their household ration 
to 13 2-10 pounds a year, or a bit over 

1 pound of sugar a month. Even this 
meagre ration could not be filled by 
the French government It was found 
early iu the fnll. America was then 
asked for 100,000 tons of sugar and 
succeeded in sending 85,000 tons by 
December 1. The French request was 
granted because the American house- 
hold consumption was then at least 55 
pounds per person, and It was consid- 
ered the ' duty of maintaining the 
French morale made our course clear." 

Today the sugar situation may 
be summarized by stating that If 
America will reduce its sugar con- 
sumption 10 to 15 per cent, thlo 
nation will be abta to send 200,000 
more soldiers to France. 
Sugar today sella at seaboard re- 
fineries at $7.25 u hundred pounds. 
The wholesale jrocer has agreed' to 
limit bis profit to 25 cents a hundred 
plus freight, and the rotull grocer la 
supposed to take no tuoro than 50 rents 
a hundred pounds profit. This regu- 
lation was mude by the food admiula 
trutlun, which uuw uaka the boutwwlfe 
to reduce sugar consumption Bi much 
tm possible, using other ie 
and also reminds bar that *i I 

pay no mora than cents a pound, tor 
sugar, 
Centre! at Cana fulmars' Fronts. 
-Immediately upon thsx establish 
steal of the too4 adsalaUMrf lioo, ' Mr, 



Hoover said, "an examination was 
made of the costs and profits of refin- 
ing and It was finally determined that 
the spread between the cost of raw 
and tbo sale of refined cane sugar 
should be limited to $1.30 per hundred 
pounds. The pre-war differential bad 
averaged about 85 cents and Increased 
costs were found to have been impos- 
ed by the war in increased cost of re- 
fining, losses, cost of bags, labor, Insur- 
ance, interest and other things, rather 
more than cover the difference. After 
prolonged negotiations the refiners 
were placed under agreement estab- 
lishing these limits on October 1, and 
anything over this amount to be agreed 
extortionate under the law. 

"In the course of these Investiga- 
tions it was found by canvass of the 
Cuban producers that their sugar had, 
during the first nine months of the 
past year, sold for an average of about 
$4.24 per hundred f. o. b. Cuba, to v 
which duty and freight added to the 
refiners' cost amount to about $5.66 
.per hundred. The average sale price 
of granulated by various refineries, ac- 
cording to our Investigation, was about 
$7.50 per hundred, or a differential of 
$1.84. 



"In reducing the differential tofl.JW) 
there was a savlnc to the public of 54 



"cents per hundred. Had such a dlf- 
ferentlal been In use from the 1st of 
January, 1917, the public .would have 
saved in the first nine months of the 
year about $24,800.'000." 
Next Year. 
With a view to more efficient organ- 
ization of the trade in imported sugars 
next year two committees have t been 
formed by the food administration : 

1. A committee comprising repre- 
sentatives of all of the elements of 
American cane refining groups. The 
principal duty of this committee is to 
divide the sugar imports pro rata to 
their various capacities and see that 
absolute Justice is done to every re- 
finer. 

2. A committee comprising three rep- 
resentatives of the English, French 
and Italian governments ; two repre- 
sentatives of the American refiners, 
with a member of the food administra- 
tion. Only two of the committee have 
arrived from Europe, but they reprc- 
sTrrnrrmra uicd gove r nments. m e du- 
ties of this committe e are to determine 
the most economical sources from a 
transport point of view of all the al- 
lies to arrange transport at uniform 
rates, to distribute the foreign sugar 
between the United States and allies, 
subject to the approval of the Ameri- 
can, English, French and Italian gov- 
ernments. 

Uhls committee, while holding strong 
views as to the price to bo paid for 
Cuban sugar, has not had the final 
voice. This voice has rested in the 
governments concern «d, together with 
the Cuban government, and I wish to 
stato emphatically that all of the gen- 
tlemen concerned as good commercial 
men have endeavored with the utmost 
patience and skill to secure a lower 
price, and their persistence has re- 
duced Cuban demands by 15 cents per 
hundred. The price agreed upon is 
about $4.60 per hundred pounds, f. o. b. 
Cuba, or equal to about $6 duty paid 
New York. 

"This price should eventuate," 
Mr. Hoover said, "to about $7.30 
per hundred for refined sugar from 
the refiners at seaboard points or 
should place sugar in the hands of 
the consumer at from Sy 2 to 9 
eenta per pound, depending upon — 



thav sad 
itstiflleo 

Ji 



locality and conditions of trade, or 
at from 1 to 2 cents belgw the 
prices of August last and from one- 
half to a cent per pound cheaper 
than today. 

"There is now an elimination of 
speculation, extortionate profits, and 
ic the refining alone the American, 
people will save over $25,000,000 of 
the refining charges last year. A part 
of these savings goes to the Cuban, 
Hawaiian, Porto Rican and Lousianian 
producer and part to the consumer. 

"Appeals to prejudice against the 
food administration have been made 
because the Cuban price is 84 cents 
above that of 1917. It Is said in effect 
that the Cubans are at our mercy ; 
that we could get sugar a cent lower. 
We made exhaustive study of the cost 
of producing sugar in Cuba last year 
through our own agents in Cuba, and 
we find it averages $3.39, while many 
producers are at a higher level. We 
found that an average profit of at 
least a cent per pound was necessary 
in order to maintain and stimulate 
production or that a minimum price of 
$4.37 was necessary, and even this 
would stifle some producers. 

"Tbo price ultimately agreed was 2." 
cents above these figures, or about one- 
fifth of a cent per pound to the Ameri- 
can consumer, and more than this 
amount has been saved by our reduc- 
tion in refiners' profits. If we wish to 
stifle production in Cuba wo could 
take that course Just at the time of all 
times in our history when wo want 
production for ourselves aud the al- 
lies. Further than that, the state de- 
partment, will assure you that such a 
course would produce disturbances In 
Cuba and destroy even our present 
supplies, but beyond all these material 
reasons ts one of human justice. This 
great country has no right by the 
might of Us position to strangle Cuba. 

"Therefore there is no Imposition 
upon the American public. Charges 
have been made bofore this commit- 
tee that Mr. Itolph endeavored to boo* 
i lit tbo Cnllfornlu refinery of which he 
was manager by this 'M cent Increase 
in I'ulmtj price. Mr. Itolph did not Hi 
tin- price. It does ruisu the price to 
tlin Hawaiian farmer about that 
amount It does not raise the protlt of 
California reOaery, i that* 

charge for rnttntng la, like all olhwr re 
liners, limited tO H R PO* hundred 

pounds, piun the frtlgni differential on 

I lie rstuhlUlied eunioiii of the trade. 

"Mr. Uolpb baa not ona penny of tit 
tereet la thai rounsry , " 




SVG 



i-wheat 

use more com 

2-meat - 

use mote ft sh <£, beans 

3-fats 

use Just enough - 



4-$u£a 



use syrups 

and serve 
the cause of freedom 

U.S. FOOD ADMINISTRATION 



WHEATLESS BISCUITS. 



Parched cornmeal Is the feature of 
these excellent wheatless biscuits. 
First, the cornmeal — one-half a cap — 
is put in a shallow pan placed in the 
oven and stirred frequently until it 
is a delicate brown. The other ingre- 
dients are a teaspoon of salt, a cup 
of peanut butter and one and a half 
cups of water. Mix the peanut but- 
ter, water and salt and heat. While 
this mixture is hot stir in the meal 
which should also be hot Beat thor- 
oughly. The dough should be of such 
consistency that It can be dropped 
from a spoon. Bake In small cakes 
In an ungreased pun. This makes 16 
.biscuits, each of which contains one- 
sixth of an ounce of protein. 



DELICIOUS CORN MUFFINS. 




This Is Our Winter 
of Test 



SERVING food Is a lo- 
cal probis u for each 
| community. Prices 
and definite rules for 
every one cannot be 
formulated. It 
is a duty for 
each one to 
eat only so 
much as is 
necessary to 
maintain the 
human body 
nealthy and strong. This winter 
of 1918 is the period when Is to 
be tested here in America wheth- 
er our people are capable of vol- 
untary individual sacrifice to 
save the world. That is the pur- 
pose of the organization of the 
United States Food Administra- 
tion — by voluntary effort to pro- 
vide the food that the world 
needs. 



THURSDAY JANUARY 17th, 1»1T. 

CORN WILL WIN 
DEMOGRAGTSWAR 




C S. FOOD ADMINISTRATION 



NEED BIG HERDS 

Europe's Meat Supply Must Come 
From America. 



Warring Nations Have Depleted Live 

Stock at Enormous Rate, Eve.i 

Killing Dairy Cattle For Food. 



Here's an old fashioned recipe for 
corn mufllns that has recently been 
revived and used with unusual success 
In several of the larger New York ho- 
tels: To make three and a half doaen 
muffins take one quart milk, six ounces 
butter substitute, twelve ounces of 
light syrup or honey, four eggs, pinch 
of salt, two ounces baking powder, 
one and a half pounds cornmeal and 
one and a half pounds rye flour. The 
butter and syrup should be thoroughly 
mixed; then add the eggs gradually. 
Pour In the milk and add the rye flour 
mixed with cornmeal and baking pow- 
der. 



# ^#> # e ^^ e T ^# ee *#e i e> #e>e>eie>ee >e ee#e>e>eee>e#^ee#0'e >#p aie > i 



n s x#> s >> < N >s »#» »enw i 



FACE the FACTS 



LET us face the facts. The war situation is critical. 
Unless the Allies fight as they never yet hav& 
fought, defeat thr ea tens. H ungry men ca nnot fight 
at their best ; nor hungry nations. France, England, 
and Italy are going hungry unless we feed them. 

Wheat Savings — They must have wheat. It is the 
best food to fight on. It is the easiest to ship. We 
alone can spare it to them. By saving just a little — 
less than a quarter of what we ate last year — we can 
support those who are fighting our battles. And we 
can do it without stinting ourselves. We have only 
to substitute another food just as good. 

The Corn of Plenty — Corn is that food. There's a 
surplus of it. Providence has been generous in the 
hour of our need. It has given us corn in such bounty 
as was never known before. Tons of corn. Train- 
loads of corn. Five hundred million bushels over and 
above our regular needs. All we have to do is to 
learn to appreciate it. Was ever patriotic duty made 
so easy? And so clear? 

America's Own Food — Corn! It is the true American 
food. The Indians, hardiest of races, lived on it. 
Our forefathers adopted the diet and conquered a 
continent. For a great section of our country it 
has blong een the staff of life. How well the South 
fought on it, history tells. Now it can help America 
win a world war. 



Learn Something — Corn! It isn't one food. It's a 
dozen. It's a cereal. It's a vegetable. It's a bread. 
It's a dessert. It's nutritious; more food value in it, 
dollar for dollar, than meat or eggs or most other 
vegetables. It's good to eat; how good you don't 
know until you've had corn-bread properly cooked. 
Best of all, it's plentiful and it's patriotic. 

Corn's Infinite Variety — How much do you know about 
corn? About how good it is? About the many 
delicious ways of cooking it? And what you miss 
by not knowing more about it? Here are a few 
of its uses: 

There are at least fifty ways to use corn meal to 
make good dishes for dinner, supper, lunch or break- 
fast. Here are some suggestions: 



DESSERTS 

Corn-meal molasses cake. 
Apple corn bread. 
Dumplings. 
Gingerbread. 
Fruit gems. 



HOT BREADS 

Boston brown bread. 

Hoecake. 

Muffins. 

Biscuits. 

Griddle cakes. 

Waffles. 

HEARTY DISHES 

Corn-meal croquottos. 

Meat aud corn-meal dumplings*. 

Italian i»ol»uita. Tamalee. 

The recipes are in Farmers' Bulletin 565, "Corn 
Meal as ft Food and Way* of Using It," free from the 
Department of Agriculture 



American stock breeders are being 
asked to conserve their flocks and 
herds in order to meet Europe's tre- 
mendous demands for meats during 
the war And probably lot many years 
afterward. 

The United States food adminis- 
tration reports that American stock 
raiseiw' have shown a disposition to 
co-operate with the government in in- 
creasing the nation's supply of live 
stock. 

Germany today Is probably better 
supplied with live stock than any oth- 
er European nation. When the Ger- 
man armies made their big advance 
into France and then retreated vir- 
tually all the cattle In the invaded 
territory — approximately 1,800,000 
head — were driven behind the German 
lines. 

But In England— where 2,400,000 
acres of pasture lands have been turn- 
ed into grain fields — the cattle herds 
are decreasing rapidly. One of the 
reasons apparently is the declining 
maximum price scale adopted by the 
English as follows: For September, 
$17.76 per 100 pounds ; October, $17.28 ; 
November and December, $16.08; Jan- 
lary, $14.40. The effect of these prices 
was to drive beef animals on the mar- 
ket as soon as possible. 

In Franc , the number of cattle as 
well as tue quality have shown an 
enormous decline during the war. 
Where France had 14,807,000 head of 
cattle in 1013, she now has only 12,- 
841,000, a decrease of 16.6 per cent 
And France is today .producing only 
one gallon of milk compared to two 
and one-half gallons before the war. 

Denmark and Holland have been 
forced to sacrifice dairy herds for beef 
because of the lack of necessary feed. 

Close study of the European meat 
situation has convinced the Food Ad- 
ministration that the future problem 
of America lies largely in the produc- 
tion of meat producing animals and 
dairy products rather than In the pro- 
duction of cereals for export wheu 
the war will have ceased. 



BRITISH GOVERNMENT 
BEEPS PAY FOR BREAD 



America's Greatest Cereal Crop 

Is Now Moving to 

Market. 



MAINSTAY IN NATION'S CRISIS. 



Surplus Wheat of the United States 

Has Been Sent to Famine Threat 

encd Europe. 



America's great corn crop, exceed- 
ing 3,000,000,000 bushels, will save the 
world's food situation, officials of the 
United States food administration be- 
lieve. 

Corn Is the nation's best food cereal, 
housewives are beginning to realize. 
It contains all the elements needed to 
keep the body ha a state of health and 
when used according to the scores of 
tried recipes, especially when com- 
bined with an added portion of oil or 
fat, will sustain life indefinitely. In- 
dian warriors In colonial days lived on 
parched corn alone for many days at a 
time, and at Valley Forge parched 
corn was at tunes the sole ration of, 
the Continental soldiers. 

Owing to transportation difficulties 
caused by the war the corn crop moved 
more slowly to market this year than 
ever before Now, however, the cereal 
is reaching the millers and consumers. 
In the meantime the nation's surplus 
wheat has been sent to Europe. 

Today there are approximately 80 
bushels of corn for every American. 
This quantity is greater by five bush- 
els than in former years. 

Corn lias become the nation's main* 
stay In the crisis of war. 

Just as this cereal saved the first 
American colonists from famine on 
jriHt tig It gpreorl «a a 



There has been much misunder- 
standing about the bread program in 
England. It Is true that the English- 
man buys a loaf of bread for less than 
'an American can, but it Is poorer 
bread, and the British government is 
paying $200,000,000 a year toward the 
.cost of it 

All the grain grown in Great Brit- 

l ain is taken over by the government 

at an arbitrary price and the imported 

! wheat purchased on the markets at 

I the prevailing market price. This is 

I turned over to the mills by the govern- 

■ment at a price that allows the adul- 

' terated war bread loaf of four pounds 

j to sell nt 18 cents, the two pound loaf 

at 9 cents and the one pound loaf at 5 

cents. 

, In France, under conditions some- 
what similar, but with a larger ex- 
traction, the four pound loaf sells for 
, 16 cents. 

MAKING MEATLESS 
I DAYS PERMANENT. 



Corn-moal fish balls. 



l>+++4 + 0++ —++ — » 0*0 *»»—+*0 * **** » *+» * + — *» + + * * 44 4 4l4**+*****—»* * 



In the meatless menu there is a fer- 
tile Held for developing new and nour- 
ishing dishes, according to E. II. Nile*, 
writing In the ilotel Gazette, who be- 
lieves that jtho present shortago of 
meat nnd fats will not end wlih tin- 
coming of peace, but may grow our*) 
•cute uud continue for five or sli 
years, thus limiting It worth while to 
develop menu* of |Nkln, v»'k« tables 
and flab 00 u utoru or |«M p«-niiiiiiciit 
basis Meal 
and other, i 

served Iu very mall portloM aa u (la 
voi-tug f' r,l " <1 ln uiastng up 

meatless uhmiu. ibis author finds SOI 
American Oreoii re cuisine 

• tread fteM Ivf iatssilaat.ua. 



staple food during the War of the Rev- 
olution and during the Civil War; King 
Corn has again come to the front In 
the nation's battle with autocmcy. 

Corn raenl is finding greatly increas- 
ed use in the making of ordinary white 
bread. Hundreds of housewives and 
many of the larger bakers are mixing 
20 per cent, corn meal with wheat 
flour to make leavened bread. This 
kind of a mixture is worked and baked 
in the same recipes and with the same 
methods that apply to straight wheat 
bread. 

Corn bread — using corn meal entire- 
ly — Is gaining a greater popularity 
than ever before Housewives are 
coming to realize that every pound of 
wheat saved ie America means a pound 
of wheat released for shipment to the 
nations with which America Is associ- 
ated ln the war. 

There are a score of corn products 
that today possess unusual Importance 
for Americans. Corn syrup for sweet- 
ening corn cakes and buckwheat cakes 
and for use in the kitchen instead ot 
granulated sugar Is one of the leading 
products made from corn. 

Corn oil, excellent for frying and foe 
every" other purpose filled by salad oils, 
is appearing on the market ln large 
quantities. It comes from the germ of 
the corn. 



MAOE-IN-GERMANY LIES 
CIRCULATED IN CANADA 



Canada is also having trouble with 
Made-in-Germany lies calculated to 
hinder Canadian food conservation ae» 
carding to an official statement re- 
ceived from the Canadian food con- 
troller by the United States food ad- 
ministration. 

The stories bothering Canada are 
of the same general character as those 
the United States food administra- 
tor recently denounced ln this coun- 
try, such as the ridiculous salt and 
blueing famine fakes and the report 
that the government would setzo 
housewives' stocks of home canned 
goods. 

The Canadian food controller esti- 
mates that when the people listen to 
and pass on such stories, each one 
has the power of destruction that lies 
ln a battalion of soldiers. 

"Stories without even a vestige of 
foundation have been scattered broad- 
cast," said the Canadian statement 
"Nor have they come to life casually. 
They have started simultaneously in 
different parts of the country and ln 
each instance have been calculated to 
arouse public Indignation. 

"They are insidious, subtle, persist- 
ent Bit by bit they dissipate public 
trust, the great essential ln the work 
of food control. 

"It lies with every Individual to for- 
bear from criticism; to refrain from 
passing on the vagrant and harmful 
story, and thus the more effectively 
to co -opcrato in work which is going 
to mean more than the majority of 
people yet realize." 



■ssiesei 



THE UNITED STATES FOOD 

ADMINISTRATION SAYS: 

There la no royal road to food 
conservation. VVe can only ao> 
complish this by the voluntary 
action of our whole people, each 
element in proportion to Us means. 
It la a matter of equality of bur- 
den; a matter of minute saving 
and auiiatitutton at every point In 
the 20 000.000 Mtohena. on the M* 
000,000 dinner tables, and In that 
1.000,000 manufeetMrino, wrhete- 
•ale ens' retail sstehWehssee e i «♦ 
the country, t 



i >5* ;.£i. ■; ^-ssf ■ J;4.~i; -;*- ± 



■ 






THURSDAY JANUARY '21th, lilS. 

*^— — — — ■ ■ . i - _ , , , 



BOONE CO. RECORDER, 

W. L. RIDD1LL. Publisher. 




\ 



MONEY AND HEROISM |KK2KJK:K3K^S3fKXSK3K2CSK3K 





Will Not Win the War-The Al- 

lies and Their Soldiers Must 

Have Food. 

At the request of the Food Admin- 
istration of Kentucky, r attended 

the War Conference at Louisville 
January 15th and 16th. Almost every 
county of our State was represented 
by their respective chairmen. 

Practically every speech made em- 
phasized the food situation as the 
most important problem just at this 
particular time. Our meu are not 
ready to go to France, and our allies 
and their families must be fed by us 
with the food we have now on hand, 
. „.. 't means that we semi food now or 

Herman Wingate, who had meas vastly more blood later on. 
les at Camp Taylor, wfll be sent N„ matter the aire or s<\ we can 
home to recuperate. There is eometall enlist in BendiuR wheat mea 
question as to him being able toaugar and fats by using tbe'substi- 
return to the service for Bometttites our government advises. 
lim '"- ,' Lei US systematically observe our 

""■— • meat less and wheatless davs ; let us 

W. P Cropper, Boone's Repre- Uoilow-tha 'directions that shall be 
■entative in the Legislature ha*l-S JV?a ° 8 f ro »n time to time by those 

^hp are studying this great factor in 

t has 
..omen 
ot America so greatly assist as bv 
e nli s ting in the Food Administra- 
tion and cheerfully accepting its di- 
rection and advice."' 

All the blood, all the heroism, all 
the money and munitions in the 
world will not win this war unless 
our allies and the armies behind 
thein are fed. 

EUNIE B. WILIJS. 



1xh.ii placed on the- foilowin* com , ° are Htu «y»ng this great fact 
mittovs: Fire and Insurance; Pub ■ wm »ing the war. QnrPresiden 
Warehouses and Granaries; ^*7,' ' * a hodIK£4Jooeaa thewc 



nevenue and Taxation; Redistiict 
mg Judicial — Chairman State 
Fair; Sinking Fund. 



Dr. Yelton\s sleigh struck a 
snow drift out on the Belleview 
pike last Monday night and turn- 
ed over, throwing the doctor over 
against a wire fence and landing 
on top of him, and it was some 
time before he succeeded in extri 
eating himself. At one time he 
thought ho would have to remain 
under the sleigh until someone 
chanced to come along and res-1 
cue him, hut he persevered in his 
efforts until success came. The 
sleigh was badly disabled. Fort- 
unately the horse stood while the 
doctor was working to free him- 



self. 



The work of collecting timber 
for the construction of a tempo- 
rary bridge accosa Gunpowder 
creek at Lima burg, on the Burling 
ton and Florence pike was begun 
last Friday and several very fine 
timbers for the purjwse was put 
where they -will l>e convenient 
when the work is be^un, which 
will not be until the present ^rop 
of ice and snow is gone: the pro b- 

will bo at flood tide when the M°*° rf . drBB ^pTs, 3 swear> 
runout is in progress and would 
destroy the bridge. John Conrad, 
who has the contract for carry- 
ing the mail is the prime mover 
in the work which is developing 

[■« community spirit that is truly 

^commendable. 



Mayor McCullough. of Lawrence 
'burg, Indiana, ordered 700 men to 
equip themselves with axes last 
Monday morning and hie them- 
selves to the tall and uncut in 
the vicinity of that city to pre- 
pare fuel to tide the people over 
the fuel famine that was at hand. 
Aurora also sent a strong force 
to the nearby forests to prepare 
fuel for distribution among her cil 
izens, while the citizens of Pet- 
ersburg were clearing snow from 
convenient drift piles in the neigh 
borhood. The fuel problem in 
these three small towns, as well 
as in many others along the riv- 
er, has been in a manner distress 
"•ng with no prospect of conditions 
oncoming better for some time. * 



Red Gposs Notes. 

The American Red Cross lias or- 
ganized at National Headquarters a 
Bureau of Communication to give to 
re atives of American soldiers de- 
tails of casualties at the front. Any 
information of interest or consola'- 
tiou to relatives thus obtained will 
be transmitted to them through per- 
sonal letters. 

F i ni shed work turned in last week : 
Union— 214 4-ineh compresses, [Hi 9- 
inch compresses. 160 special dress- 
ings 8x4. To sponges. 
Florenee-2 pairs wristlets. IS pairs 
socks, :< hospital shirts, 77 9-inch 
compresses, 249 4-i«eh compresses. 
Walton— 75 special dressings 8x4. 
B. H. S.— 74 4 inch compresses, 28 

sponges. 
Burlington— 259 4-inch composes. 
BOfhrrfod dressings, 3 -swearer 
helmet, S scarfs, 1 pair socks. 
The call for 300 special dressings 
8 inches by 4 inches, was filled bv 
Petersburg 225, Union 150, Walton 
100 Burlington 125. The simplicity 
of the dressing enabled the workers 
to turn out a number in a very short 
time. 

A large box has been readv for 
some time, but the condition of the 
roads has delayed its going. No 
gauze is in this shipment as a sepa- 
rate consignment of dressings is now 
being made ready. Over 1300 pieces 
were wrapped Saturday afternoon. 
This box contains 53 sweaters, 4 hel- 
mets, 4 scarfs, 186 pairs socks, 4 pairs 
wristlets, 200 hospital shirts, 20 hot 
water bottle covers, 20 wash clothes. 
3 pairs bed socks. 45 triangular band- 
ages, 25 many-tailed bandages, 15 
four-tailed bandages, 5 T bandages. 

Four schools in the countv have 
started the knitted squares for an 
afghan: Union. Hebron, Petersburg 
and Burlington. 



STEPHENSON BROTHERS 

HEBRON, KY. 

Owing- to the high cost of everything- we are go- 
ing to sell for cash. It is easier to pay $5 than $25. 
SPECIAL ON GROCERIES: 

2 cans Corn 28c 

2 cans Pork and Beans 28c 

2 cans Peas 28c 

2 cans Saimon 35 c 

2 large cana Peaches 35 c 

1 can Old Ky. Baking Powder 10c 

2 boxes Puffed Wheat . . 28c 

2 boxes Puffed Rice 28c 

Telephone Flour, per barrel $ 1 2.00 

FEED QF ALL KINDS. 
Wc run our truck to the city every day with coun- 
try produce. Give us a call. 

Stephenson Bros, - Hebron Ky. 



ggKgSSSgXa^tCgXgKgXgXSgg 




Be Wise 

If you need Clothing now is the time to buy. 
You read from day to day how everything is ad- 
advancing, and there seems to be no stop to it. 
Ro if you need anything in a 

Man's, tag lien's or Bogs' 

SUIT or OVERCOAT 

Buy now. I have a complete line at prices that 
will satisfy you. 

— A large assortment of Sweater Ccats, Corduroy 

and Duck Coats, and Corduroy pants await your 
inspection. 

SelmarWachs, 

605 Madison Ave., - Covington, Ky. 

One-Half Square North of Old Location. 

Ill 



HILL'S 

SEEDS 

/ 

t 

Meet all Requirements from 

PURITY 

to 

-PRODUCTIVENESS 



Our seeds are the result of years of careful breeding 
! and testing and of knowing where and when to buy. 

The Hill Standard in Seeds is the highest it is possi- 
ble to attain, yet we strive for improvement. 

Confidence in the house of HIUL continues to grow 
just as surely as HILL'S SEEDS GROW. 

We will be pleased to send Samples and Quote 
I Prices. Let us hear from you. We'll Save Yeu Money 



tion to make it universal Nine-* 
tenths -of the womee do not want 
it, and will not exercise the right 
without being urged to do so 



A few States in the Union <have 

^SeaS&co^S.™^ T Sl ,e,0,, ° " '"Ma.es o. "Boone county 
5Sn ^ S Vun^erLf h Nia£rt2MJE t S5*& ¥* during the 



Boone County Farm Sales. 

A. E. Foster & Son, Real Estate 

Agents, with offices at 823 Madison 

Ave., Covington, gy. report to us 

Cfie following ^ales of Boone county 



For Sale. 



United States Food Administration License Number G-01206. 




Phone Order Dept. S. 1855 or 1856. 




OUR BUSINESS' IS BANKING 



-n »w"w»- ",t .1 « v .1 1 UU11IIU III! 

last half of December and the first 
half of January: The Elsie Purcell 
farm of 20 acres near Florence; the 
«. J. Maybery farm on Dixie High 



This was proven ft the race for ™ «Wg^a2^3u*2g.: 
tShft gchr*>l Superintendent in JBMS SSSSSSS^SSl %& 

j£ l ?vL*°lV nh * r * kctlon There way south of Florence of 20 acres- 
are three (thousand woman vot-.; the Mel vin Jones farm „n M f Vw 
ers in Pendleton county, and out ! roa «i I ol ! M aSS t £ Hi" 
of that large number only 200 | farm near Erlanger ti7 acres Toil 

£«. i,«?i * I ' .1 r. the rac ° i or an average of $IOfS per ace. Wii v 
Tr« w i y £ ontested : Congressman not listyou?farn> with thein for sale! 
Arthur B Rouse voted against the What they have dime for others theV 
amendment in Congress last week, : can do for von. F or ref erence you 
and wo think he was about right are asked b.'coinma JeSe with S 
Nevertheless, woman suffrage is of the above sellers r anv bank u 



coming, so get ready for it 

The total population of all the 
nations involved in thf war, ex- 
cepting the United States, is ap 
proximately 1,500,000.000 souls. Or 
man has died for every 230 li\ 
ing men, women and children in 
these warring nations. The dead 
in the world war are about equiv 
ale-nt to the entire population of 
the State of Ohio 



Kenton or Boone counties. 



Little Robert Elmer Horton. 

proximately l,5d6,OOO.OOo"souls" One | *1 te ' a J?J ie J ^"g Robert El- 
man has died for everv 230 liv- *"??' ®° n °, f Ernest Horton ana 



>rm ■•' In the firhtin >■ mor Mlli Dt ' sadly missed notpnlv 

b in four daysthV Ger , >v h , is l )aronts ™* relatives but 

ties alone totaled 1. r ,D- >v hlH lio . a " h , ttlc sister, who is 

' now so grieved over her little 



wife, passed to his reward Janu- 
ary 15th, 1918, a.<jied 2 years, f«ur 
months and 16 days. Little Eimer 
was a bright and cheerful child 
and wo are left to wonder why 

In the battle of' Gettsbura hUrhl ho . Ws ? ^, aken ?*"ay" while so young 
water mark of the Civil War th- a™ tender. It is so hardtogive 
total losses in kilJod, wounded k UI * + °ti- ?? e , UI> ' *? ut God knows 
and missing were 23,000. As manv < ' Hl8 , lutle v 'o»ce and foot 
men fell in one charse before Ver st, * pB w , e ^ ear S° mom Little Ef- 
•dun this sprint In th.e rhtin r fJ * 1 ". wH b( ' sadly missed not only 

near Rheims 
man casualt 
000. 

All tho Uves lost in the ^meri- « Jw ' ut W ' P knmv he i8 safo 
can wars ar> little moiv than Ln ,. ,. ; "' mi * , of , , Jo3US > forhet said 
12 per cent of the number who su1f( ' r btile children to come unto 
have answered "taps" for the - n£V Jt r, \r f . irb, [ J thcm n °t ter such 
last time in the thre> vemrn of £ tho Kingdom of Heaven. At 
this world war. * \ tur l^ we huVD al! f(>lt thatwehave 

^ i nothing to live for but his sor- 

„ . . T ! row n « is brought us nearer to God 

I'rankfort, Jan. 14. — Kentucky and we hope to meet our sweet 
has ratified nation-wide prohi little son and brother in the 
bition. By an overwhelming major home of Glory, 
ity in the House, and without al The funeral service was conduct 
dissenting vote in the Senate, the <•<' by Hro. Rover on the 17th it 
national dry amendment was put iHopeful church, after which the 
over late yesterday afternoon. The Uttle body was laid to r.st in 
vote in the House was (i6 to 10. Hopeful cemetery. 

Kentucky is the first "wet" state — - 

to ratify the national amendment. Card of Thanhs.— We desire to' 
It is the third state tovoUyuj, express our sincere thanks to our 
on it, and the third to ratifj c, relatives, friends and neighbor* 
Mississippi and Virginia air. am for their many acts of kindnesa 
having taken Bimilar i< iion in ; «'»d sympathy extended toward 
the matter. Legislatures nl eight' n« in. out' bencavetnoiit in Chelosa 
OUar States are to meet this of our dear little son a%)l brother, 
year to consider tin- amendment.. Robort Blmer Hot ion, and wb 
Dry leaders do nor believe thai "dre to thank Bro Royor sn 1 
the amendment csn »>;>■ .idopten Mr. Smith, 1 In- undertaker, ind 
under the moat favorable eireum- >ls.. Dr. Benour for their klndnt-u 



Cne acre land with frame house 
and two outbuildings, f miles from 
pi lie ; the property known as the Ca- 
son BChoolhouse situated on the pub- 
lic road leading from the Burlington 
& Belleview pike beginning near 
Mrs. Eliza Walton's to East Bend 
road. House cost $450 when material 
and labor were about half cost of 
present time. • All bids must be sent 
uuder seal to J. C, Gordon, Superin- 
tendent Schools. Right to reject 
any and -aH bids reserved. This 
property is suitable for home for 
small family or tenant house. 

Terms- 1-3 cash, 1-3 six months, 
1-8 in twelve months, deferred pay- 
ments to bear legal rate of interest 
with lein retained to secure deferred 
paymonts. 

Done by order Board of Education 
Boone Co., Jan. 8th. 191S. 

J. C. GORDON. Chairman. 
CHAS. KELLY, Secretary. 



ANNUAL STATEMENT 
Of the Mutual Fire Insurance Co., 
of Boone County: 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1917. . . S 118.20 
Policy fees received in 1917. 88ti.40 
Assessments received 1916 . 2,404.93 



Total receipts $3,404.53 

Expenditures for 1917: 

Losses paid *2,2I3.74 

Paid to officers, 4c 484.50 

Paid for rebates. 50. 1H 

Paid for taxes. . 19.30 

Paid miscellaneous 17S.20 



Total expenditures 
Bal. on hand Jan. 1, T 



12,961.99 

452.01 



$3,404.5:1 
M.U: TANNER, Pres. 
R. B. HUEV, Sectv. 



AdministraFor's Notice. 
All persons indebted to the estate 
of Charles E. Clore. deceased, must 
come forward and settle said indebt- 
edness, and those having claims 
against said estate must, present 
thein to the undersigned proven as 
by law required in such cases. 

JOHN W. CLORE, Admr. 
of the estate of Charles E<. Clore. 



*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 



WANTED FARM HAND 

Married man to worfx by 
tho month. Steady wor}L and 
good wages. Inquire at Par- 
lor Grove Farm. ' 
C. LINTON HEMPFKINO. 
Taylorsporit, Ky. 



To those who Have Sold To- 
bacco to Thompson & 

Wingate. 

We will not receive any of our 
purchase of tobacco at Pet- 
ersburg. Your contracts call 
for -delivery at Aurora and 
the unusual price was paid 
to insure its being brought 
to the Aurora Loose Leaf 
Market the best in the coun- 
try. 

All tobacco must be in 
good, winter order. No wet 
or fat-stemmed >jill be ac- 
cepted. Dealers make a dif- 
ference of 10 to IS cents in 
price where it is found in 
this condition. All tobacco 
now stripped mast be hung 
beforfc dlivered. 

a 

We are sorry river con- 
ditions have delayed delive- 
ry, but must ask our friends 
to be patient. We are ready 
to receive and pay for all to- 
bacco contracted for as soon 
as ferrying i$ resumed at 
Aurora. 

THOMPSON & 
WINGATE. 



We devote all our time, attention and energy to 
it. Very naturally, we want your patronage. 
What we have to entitle us to your business 
is whole hearted attention to your needs; court- 



eous and prompt attention to you ; thirty years 
experience and more than $300,000 assets as se- 
curity for your business. If there is any thing 
lacking we do not appear to have .discovered it. 
We appreciat e perti nent suggestions for our im- 
provement, if you find it necessary. 

Call and see us if you want to borrow, de- 
posit or loan money. 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 
We will serve you in making your purchase of 
War Saving Stamps and Certificates, without 
charge. No tax on your deposits with us. 

3 Per Cent on Time Deposits. 





standi*, from th» ir jiolnt of m,uv 
in leu* than three years, ual 
1st elapse after Us 
th>* thirty-sixth a'.ut 
IpAtm thi nation foes dry. 



in 



Th- li.'i r n i-l Finuls 

a party wh< » n\ 1 « Inter 

lai» m t/\ Identl) the .otdeal 

••■Hon livmg. 



For several days It/ has not 
been tmeotnmon to seWshovels at 
i.olud to tho saddle* of those 
riding on horseback, i»» the-v diu 
not know vvlu-n theyf would en- 
counter a snow drlftf they would 
\ui\f to dig throughl There are 
Opt* living in MmluiK'tdu 
ii*niK r them who h;{\ t out u-htI 
oi»' m thirty years 



Tsse the RHCORDHH. 



I 



For Sale— Good Farm. 

Worth the money, 150 acres In 
Bdoqe county, easy days drive of 
Cincinnati's markets. Good dwell- 
ing, 8 barns, level to rolliriK land- 
most, all in grasB; plenty of good to- 
bacco hind. Is on pike, well watered 
and fenced; splendid nolKhborhond • 
on It. K. I), and telephone liii.s'. 
Price $70.00 per acre on very easy 
I "i iiih; also a garden farm of40acres 
near It. K. Station in K.nloii eeunty 
•2 houses, one 4-ri>onis and other h-' 
rooms; large barn with new r«.<.f- a 
productive farm for t^QOO.OO. Many 
other faruiH in Hooim and Kenton 

OOUntles. Money to lend on farm 

property, a number of d.niiabi<- 

city properties to trad* for farms, 
l,.t us s».ll >.. 111 farm Tornado and 
Wind Htorm Insurance »t h»wcnt 

v ' mi, HaaWaJi 

Uovlngl 
i»" »»-»» Pbona 8. 1'iQO 



II will have two carloads of DAYBREAK FER- 
TILIZER, pure animal matter fertilizer, in Erlan- 
ger, the last of January or the first of February: 
I will sell at the car or deliver it to your place. 

G. H. Y0UELL, . Limaburg, Ky. 



T*. 




(Not Incorporated) 

FORD SALES AND SERVICE, 
TIRES, TUBES AND ACCESSORIES. 

We are uow prepared to deliver your car immediate! 

Give us your Order before the Price go up. 

Touring Cara, $36000. Runabouts, $345.00. 
P. 0. U. Detroit. 

SENOUR 8c HICKS, 

UNION, KENTUCKY. 




V 



f/l^i? 



^L 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



I 



Public Sale! 

On account of having sold my farm on the East Bend road, 
4 miles south of Burlington, Ky., I will offer at public auction, 
without reserve, on 

Thursday, Feb. 7, 1918 

The Following Property. 
9 milch cows, two registered, 2 fresh, 4 due to be fresh in 40 
days; 2 two-yr. old heifers, 2 one-yr. old heifers, 1 eligible 
to register; 3 Duroc sows will farrow in March, Duroc Boar 
3-yrs. old eligible to register; 2 1-2 H. P. Fairbanks & Morse 
gas engine and cutting box; road wagon, 2-h. sled, 2 Dixie 
Cultivators, jumping shovel plow, corn-drill, two section 60- 
tooth Columbian harrow, 1-h. wheat drill, Sharpies Cream 
Separator in first-class condition, 15-gal. bbl. churn good as 
new, stack No. 1 timothy hay, 4 8-gal. cream cans, good 
buggy, 700 tobacco sticks, X-Ray 150 egg incubator, 500 
little chick brooder, lot Red River Early Ohio seed potatoes 
4 doz. chickens, 18 cow chains, forks, shovels, hoes, etc, some 
Household and Kitchen Furniture. 




THURSDAY JANUARY 24th, 191S. 



County News Items 



Interesting .facts Gathered During the Week by Our 
Regular Correspondents. 



FLICKERTOWN. 



♦ 
♦ 



Master Carl Snyder has measles. 

Herman Rucie is able to be out 
again. 

Mrs, Sarah White, who was sick 
last week is better. 

Four inches more of snow fell 
here Monday night. 

James W. White was sick sev- 
eral days last week. 

Farmers are hauling feed from 
Aurora— crossing the river on the 
ice. 

Ralph White was the guest of 
his parents last Saturday and Sun- 
day. 

Pearl Brady is home from Law- 
renceburg, where she was work- 
ing 



PT. PLEASANT. 



Val Dolwiek is out after a light 
attack of pneumonia. 

Grandma Laile, mother of Allie 
Laile, has a bad case of gagrippe. 

Great flocks of crows are raid- 
ing the corn fields in search of 
food. 

The Recorder is a welcome guest 
to our firesides these long winter 
evenings. 

Miss Mabel Morris is at home 
after a stay of several day swith 
friends in the city. 

Uncle Henry Horton, who has 
teen living at H. V Tanner's sev- 
eral years, is very ill of grippe. 

The extreme cold weather was 



Henry and Willis Smith and fam .^, 

VVill-i ery P ard on livestock of all kinds, 



ilies were guests at Grant 
iamson's Sunday. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ FLORENCE. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



I especially young pigs, of which C. 
E. Tanner lost several 
B. H. Tanner had the misfortune 



The 

Advertisements 

in This Paper 

Cover 

the Community 



1 
l 



The opposition to President Wil 
son's management of the war has 
become very outspoken and -is 
decidedly pleasing to the Kaiser 
and his gang, no doubt. It is very 
easy to criticise and say how 
things should be done, but words 
and performance are different 
things. There is no question but 
there are many inefficient, officers 
both civil and military, but be- 
cause of that fact the en'.;. 
fabrics should not [y> denounced 
as inefficient. This country m 
unpre p a re d for war — -eith+r — at- 



home or abroad at the beginning 
of President Wilson's administra- 
tion, and who were responsible for 
that condition? Largely those who 
are going about the country crit- 



Terms — Sums of $5 and under, cash; over $5 a credit of six months will 
be given purchaser to give note with approved security payable at Citizens 
Deposit Bank, Grant, Ky. Sale to begin at 12 o'clock sharp. 

Mrs. Addie 



A. D. WILLIAMSON, Auctioneer. 



Pope, 




When Business Needs You Most, 
— Conserve Your Energy 

When success means straining nerve 
force to the utmost 

—-•when minutes given to your affairs are 
precious 

— —when your strength is the driving force 
of your store or factory or farm 

— then you must have a motor car. 

* * * * 

A motor car saves valuable time — saves 
your vitality — during business hours. 

And — after business hours — provides 
recreation and vigor — giving outdoor en- 
joyment that helps you in the daily battle. 

* * * « 

The economy, durability, and mechanical 
perfection of the standardized Maxwell car 
have been proved so conclusively they are 
now accepted facts/ 

The Maxwell is the car without a peer for 
the man who is working under full steam. 



HEBRON. 



e 
•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Preaching next Sunday at 2:30 
p. m 

Quite a number of our people 
went to Anderson's Ferry, Sunday, 
afternoon and walked across the 
river. 

Henry McGlasson and Miran Gai 
nett tookSthe High School pupils, 
and teacher, Miss Rogers, a slea 
ride last Thursday night. 

Our mail carrier, Elijjah Steph- 
ens, could not get over part oi 
his route last week, the roads be- 
ing bloc ked so badl y with snow. 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

'♦ RABBIT HASH. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



Miss Nannie Corbin is alck. 

Ed. Clutterbuck is very ill 

Cliff Norman is sick at his home 
on the Union pike. 

Charles Oclsner was the guest 
of his father last Saturday and 
Sunday. 

Miss Alma Blankenbeker was 
theguest of Miss Lena Tanner last 
Monday. 

Leslie Carpenter, who masheu 
his foot badly one day last 
week is able to be out again. 

Rev. Elmer Lucas and familv 
will move t:> Dayton, Ky., where 
they will make their future home. 
' Stanley Lucas, who is in camp 
in Geo-~ : - ..rites that he is well, 
and that the nights down there 
are cool. 

Dr. J. H Grant has been com- 
missioned Captain in the Medical 
section, Officers' Reserve Corps, 
and is awaiting orders. 

Milton Carpenter, who is at 
Camp Shelby, writes he is not 
homesick, but that he would like 
to see his Kentucky friends. 

Mrs. Mamie Baxter returned 
from Reading, Ohip, after a week's 
stay with her sister, Mrs. Trvling, 
who is ill with grippe and * ton- 
sihtis. 

L. E Tanner and Ezra Carpen- 
ter are engaged in a new indus- 
try, packing snow. If you neea 
any of that material next summer, 
give them a call. 



to lose his valuable mule, Bob lici8in S «*e administration for not 
Glass, a few days ago, after aii! 00 " 1 ^ at tne front in Francewith 
illness of about a we^k j an immense army. These blather- 

The coldest place in this neigh- ! ^ ites ' * cco t \ d ™g *> «»£ ^ Pcla "~ 
borhood during the blizzard last i V " 8 '- *'°uJd have rushed the 
Saturday week was at Mrs. Aman- ' Amencan sotdie » tl> 



da Tanner's, '22 degrees below 0. 
The strange* light which B. T 
Kelly mentioned week before last 
was witnessed also by some ot 
the citizens in this neigh- 
hood. 



i American soiaiers to the front 
wholly unskilled in any kind of 
warfare, where they would, ere 
now, have been slaughtered by 
the thousands. Mr Wilson, realiz- 
ing this responsibility for the 
welfare of the American soldier 
abroad, has seen fit to give him 



0u J* public road is completely time in which to prepare for hi* 
blocked by snow, the only way of duties that he may at least have 
getting to Florence is around thru some chance when at the front, 
fields. A bunch of men with shov The delav is justified, 
els, and J. A Tanner and son, 
Kenneth, with their home made 
snow plow opened the road to 
the river. 



On account of the deep snow our 
mail man, L. L Childress i» un- 
able to distribute the mail over 
his entire route. He brings it to 
Florence, wherf John Fisher, col- 
ored, gets it, and brings it to 
his home and from there the neigh 
borhood got* mai] _ 



UNION. 







ftvrmi Car $745 1 RudsUr $745; Ctup* $1095 

r/Rmt $1095, Sedan with If in If'Juiis $1195 

F. O. B. Dttnit 



W. L. Kirkpatrick, Agt. 

BURLINGTON, KY. 

Phones- Farmers and Consolidated. 



Mrs. W. E- Kirtley is very sick 
and expected to live only a short 
time. 

— D. R. Orcen,— oT" Norwoodr Ohio, 
was calling on C. G, Riddell, Sat- 
urday. 

Morris Rice, of Landing, was 
here Saturday shaking hands with 
old friends. 

Mercury 22 below zero here Sun- 
day morning, 1 and 24 below Mon- 
day morning. 

Will Craig and family, of Rising 
Sun, wiere guests at R. M. Wil- 
son's, Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs Telfor McCoskey, 
of Scott county, Ind., are visiting 
at Dr. Carlyle's 

David Ryle and wife, of Cov- 
ington, are visiting his brother, 
Solon, and other relatives here. 

About 200 Rising Stunners came 
over to Rabbit Hash, last Sunday, 
walking across the river on the 
ice. 

Hugh Ryle had one of his fingers 
broken, getting it caught in he 
cogs of im engine while pumping 
water, last Wednesday. 

Lee Stephens is home from Cin- 
cinnati for a few days on account 
of the shop where ho works be- 
ing closed by order of the fuel 
director. 




GUNPOWDER. 



It Pays to Advertise. 



Bert Clore had the misfortune to 
lose a valuable calf by death a 
few days ago. 

Lewis Clegg and wife, of Long 
Branch, were shopping In Flor- 
ence, last Friday. 

W. H Smith and wife broke 
bread with Mr. and Mrs R E 
Tanner, List Monday. 

Water is scarce with some on 
our ridge, and' they are melting 
snow for domestic use. 

Miss Purcell left last week for 

Lewis county, where she will 
make her future home. 

Spencer Rouse, who in laid up 
for repairs, stepped on a nail 
a few days since, and it penetrat 



♦ 

►♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a* 

Mrs. Sam Hicks is improving 

Mrs. Susan Utz has been sick 
the past week. 

P. A Weaver is not so well, as 
he was a few days 6ince. 

E. A Blankenbeker has recover 
ed from an attack of grippe. 

For Sale—Lo t Timothy and_jClov 
or hay. J. C and C* H,»JBristow 4 

The roads Being blocked by the 
snow the trustees have had the 
school closed for the present. 

Miss Nannie D. Bristow spent 
last Saturday night with Mi 
^Marietta Love. 

Union Junior Red Cross is mak- 
ing a drive for itself and the 
largest chapter. 

Following is the Honor Roll for 
November and December: 
High School.— 

Nannie Bristow. 

Elizabeth Freedman, 

Nance Senour, 

Nannie Bristow, 

Anna Huey, . 

J. D. Moore. 
In termediate.— 

Shelly Senour, 

Anna Mae Bristow, 

Marguerite Heeney, 

John Rachel, 

Lloyd Weaver. 
Primary.— 

James Freedman, 

Ralph Barlow, 

Carl Connelly, 

Harold Weaver, 

Dorotha Barlow, 

Arthur Connelly, 

Walter Marsh.. 

Mildred Keeney, 



♦ ♦ 

♦ BUCKEYE CORNER. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Jasper Black is very sick. 

Miss Lucille Sutton, of Coving- 
ton, is here visiting her friends 
and relatives. 

Cleve Rider and wife visited, 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs William 
Sisson, of Paint Lick, Sunday. 

Mrs. Leslie McRander, who has 
been suffering from blood poison 
for about three months, is im- 
proving very slowly. 

Thos. Dailey and wife, who have 
been living on J. W. Ewbank's 
place, have moved back to their 
old home near Lancaster. 

Roy Stewart, one of the selec- 
tives from Camp Taylor, spent 
last Sunday and Mondav with his 
home folks. He expects to besent 
away at any time now. 

Add and Albert Howard," of 
Hume, HL, spent a couple of 
weeks visiting friends and rela- 
tives at this place and Beaver. 

Ten years ago they, moved from 

here to Illinois. 

Ryle Ewbank and Bryan Allphln, 
who are students at Patriot High 
School, are at home now. Their 
school closed on' account of short- 
of fuel and will remain elos- 
until after zero weather. 

Wm. Brown, 85, an old resident 
of this community, died at his old 
home Wednesday the 16th. He was 
interred in the cemetery at South 
Fork. He leaves several children, 
grandchildren and a large num- 
ber of friends to mourn his death. 
C. Scott Chambers, of Walton, 
had charge of the funeral. 






BELLBVIBW. 



Omer Shinkle is assisting Chas. 



Busy as Bass. 

There appears to be more ac- ' ed hie foot. 
Bert Rouse says that since the tivity displayed at Red Cross Fritz Tanner, of Point Pleasant 
Recorder gave publicity to the headquarters up at the court neighborhood, eame over last S*i 



i-,n+ 'Hint lm win inofli ,»„ i noui *> tn an at any other depart- urday 

fact that ho win install a silo, mcnt ^ the tom ^ or , UBtlcc# Lu ^ 

he has been unable to do anything Thn women are in charge there; Shelby Avlor," our locu 

furnishing him with the structure. 1 . B i- i~i. as. j 

Ho says further he had no idea j A H 'U «JOD Ahead. 

there were ho many different 



and bought a cow from 
Justice. Lute Bradford at a long price 



hie accommodating hifl patrons 
(lie past w«y>k on account of the 
jrvat volume of snow 



/-\i i a i l h""*- '""'»» "• "Mow. 

. OKI Sol has a pretty consider- jn« p Tann*»r our mr >1 t» ,ii 

kndB i.i a K , , |l "ilr n ^f #?• •»» h, f bte > ob » h « d of Him in di^poK- rarr ter, h* TosSs aVertog u • 

of which Is tbs bsst that rut, be i*>g of the stww that eorsra lb* mail r^ularty to .-.!! who it was 

tud ..ml la juat l„ h» Sftrth in this part of th* country, possible for him t" resch H«Tli.i 

IS. is declare. th» pries W«l and ll doss not rail a ruin to hl« ',„,, ,4 ,, ' ' ,_ 

not to in th. w*y whrah* Urn* aaaiatanee he will be on the J ,u ,s m , , 
Ust ftllo that exactly suits him. Iseverul daya. 



♦ ♦ 

♦ HUME. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Ray Sparks is impro\ing from an 
attack of pneumonia. 

Miss Ruth Roberts is the guest 
of her sister near Ryle. 

Wm. Sparks, of Verona, visited 
at Russell Sparks\ last Friday. 

H. F, Wood and wife, of Napo- 
lean, are guests at Neal Wood's. 

Charles Robinson visited bin 
mother near South Fork, l«9t Sun 
day. 

Lute AIhIoii and Fred Relmer 
made a business trip to Beaver 
last Saturday. 

The deep snow und u lack of 
fuel has caused Miss Naoma Walk- 
er to close hi*r school in district 
No. 26 

Mrs. Geo Moon-, Mr. aud Mrs. 
Lester Moore and Mrs. (J W* 

Baker, of Uig Bone, were guest h 
at J. (1 Flunell's Sunday 

Mrs. J u, r'iniM'll Is m receipt 
of a card from Was'iin-tun, |> ( 

A»t*-M M , 



Elbert Clore and mother convey 
ed to Charles E. White, Tuesday, 
50 acres of land owned by Chas. 
C. Clore at the time of bis death,; 
The land is part of the late Noah 
Utz farm and lies across the, 
road in front of the residence pf 
Abe Zellers, colored. Consideration 
not stated in the deed. 

substitute for the Burlington 
rural mail carriers and Vernon 
Pope has been appointed in his 
stead. Elijah Stephens took him 
over his route, No. 2, Tuesday, ana 
he saw some country and a few 
people he did not know were im 
existence. 

Local Fuel Administrator, Dr. E. 
W. Duncan, has ordered a car 
load of coal for Burlington, where 
the fuel question threatens to 
become acute in a few days if 
relief is not forthcoming. 

B. C Gaines made several trips 
to Burlington last week driving a 
four horse team attached to a 
large snow plow. Be was doing 
his bit towards keeping that road 
in traveling condition. 



Many thanks to Harmon Jones, 
who so kindly scraped the roads 
and roads to neighbors' houses and 
barns. Mr. Jones is a neighbor who 
is always ready to herp on all oc- 
casions. L H BUSBY. 



~ It began thawing some wbera/ 
Wednesday's sun got a fair shot 
at the snow, but at the ratefof 
that day's thaw it will take two 
years to melt the present crop of 
sr.ow. 

The mercury 'has been at or be- 
low zero more than half the morn 
ings so far this month, an un- 
heard of weather record in this 
part of the country. 



Mr. and Mrs. Jaa. T. Gaines and 
Miss Mattie Kreylioh. of Id&ewild , 
neighborhood, are visiting friends 
and relatives at Brian ger. 

Miss Graham Roberts, of Wal- 
ton, was the guest of Miasea^SaL- 
lie and Lizzie Rogers, several days 
the past week. 



The local trucks made a trip 
to the city Tuesday, being the 
first they had made in several 
days. 



titntitiK thai Ihm- son, 
of th<» 9bth <<»nip.tn' 
Rsglment M.rlii 

rivsd safe* in Pi in o 

u it 



I HlKth 
ip», ar- 

ihf 4th 



K 



Dolph In the blacksmith shop. 

Mrs. R W; Rice, Elmer, Neva 
and Perlie are recovering from 

DftftAsufill 

The Belljaview High School is 
closed for an indefinite period on 
account of measles. 

Mr. and Mrs Maddox, ofClary- 
ville, Ky., visited their daughter, 
Mrs. C, E v Baker, recently. 

Mrs. Wilbur Conner and three 
sons, Clayton Brown, Jno. Presser k 
Julius Smith, William Snelling, Jr., 
and Garnett Dolph have measles. 

Mrs. Chas Dolph, Mrs.' Spinney 
Smith, Mrs. Wm Rogers, son and 
daughter, and little Thelma Grace 
Baker have been sick the past 
week. 

The severe cold weather reach- 
ed quite a number of cellars hertf 
and the result is quite a lot of 
frozen potatoes and other 
stuff. 

Geo. Buchner, Jr, one of the 
selects from Newport aiid well 
known here, has been promoted 
to the Aviation corps, and isivovv 
located at Virginia. 

The many friends of Orville Rice 
are glad to know he is Improv- 
ing and wish him a sj>f-edv neeev 
ery, and that he mav soon be 
able to visit B e He t v te sw . 

Jo© Brady writes that lie lUtea I PETTING nils SHKHIFh 
Navy life fine and is getting ah.iirf OPT OF THOI liLK. 

ail o. k. He sent Homo (pictures 

home taken in Ins nailor cdSJtome, IKnotugh « liniilaritv of oaasas 

smle that "won't mm ott. ; ,„ tho iMuilij . o{ „ \ x „£»" 

Mis. (rertrii'le VN Uton iml Kau(- which cauafii Busie N. Vd.imi t'i 

I>h.i Roasts ipwnl ibe Chritttmus I bo advertised as deliiKiuenl when 

ui St;ini n v, Mo., with in (act, she jkii'I ln'r 
Mia. Gerti ml." . 
or, Frank, i 

to k«>nlU(k\ .ui.l iftoi i slnu-1, 
v iml ,-h ho 



Mr. and Mrs Newton Sullivan^ 
Jr., entertained several of the 
young people last Tuesday night. 

Five dollars a cord for woo din 
the tree is the price fixed by 
some of those who own timber. 

W. A Gaines crossed the river 
on the ice at Aurora last Mondav 
and went straight to Florida. 

Leonard Kite, of Waterloo, was 
transacting business In Burlington, 
Tuesday. 

Miss Pinkw> Cow en was quite ill 
food several days List weak with a se- 
vere cold. 

Stanley Stephens, w ho resides 
down ou Middle creek, has meas- 
les. 



Miie* Mary Thompson, has 

quite sick for several days. 

Hubert White has measles 






m fsct, she i>atd hi»r t:i 
l«. 1917. Sheriff 
asks the Recorder t<» make 'thin 
Statement for lam sod <My Huale 












■■■■-■ 



J J l " |,,M ^ " 



■» 



mmmmmmmmmmm^^m 



■P* 



mmmmmmmm 



"TV" 



THURSDAY JANUARY 24th, 19U. 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



Val. 



PROFIT IN WOODLOTS; HARD PROBLEMS FOR FARMER 



Saving of Time and Labor Is One of 

Big Increase in Income Can Be I Most important— Location of 
Made With Good Handling. Bui.d.n^Heips. 

Farm mannjremeat problems are 

„, _, _,.. .... among the most difficult which the 

War Conditions Make It Important j farmpr Ras t0 solvp Each crop grown 

That Every Cord of Wood Be Util- i, s a business by itself, and each class 

ired — Coal Is Scarce and ; of live stock Involves its own peculiar 

Prices Are High. difficulties. It is the task of the farm- 

I er to select and fit these business prob- 

(By T. Q. MII>LER, Dean, Uaho School ! lems together so that they will work 
of forestry.) | out wlrnout f r i r tion and with profit to 

The United States beams schedules j the fariner Logically the farmer Is fast 
of 1910 called for the value in de- i P0 mlnjr to be classed among the great 
tail of woodlot products sold from or i business men of our country, 
used on farms in 1909. This ached- 1 Cnp of tnp mf)Rr importnnt thlugs 




HAULING CROPS TO MARKET 



ule included firewood, fencing mate- 
rials, logs, railroad ties, telegraph and 
telephone poles, materials, for barrels, 
bark, stove wood, or other forest prod- 
ucts. 

With proper handling the income 
'from the farm woodlots can be tre- 
mendously increased, and no other 
class of forest laud lends Itself quite 
so readily to forest management as 




that the farmer has to consider is the 
saving of time and labor, and in con- 
sidering this he should consider the 
location of fences, gates and buildings. 
By properly locating these ho can save 
much time and energy in performing 
the regular work on the farm. 

On every new farm fences are being 
built, new buildings are being put up 
and new adjustments of fields are con- 
stantly being made ; consequently It Is 
well for ew.? .miner to carry In mind, 
or even to diagram, plans for his farm 
outlay much In ad7..--e of his actually 
handling the work. 



Average Farmer Must Haul hits Prod- 
ucts Six and One-Half Miles — 
■ Other Points. 



HOGS UTILIZE WASTE GRAINS 



MAKING PROFIT FROM MARES 



Doubtful If Any Class of Live Stock 

Is Capable of Paying Better Rate 

of Income. 

A good team of brood mares re- 
quires a considerable investment, but 
it is doubtful if any class of live 
i stock is capable of paying a better 
rate of Income. If, however, the 
mares should prove to be only "every- 
second-year" breeders, they would 
not be so profitable as If they brought 
colts each year. By breeding such 
mares in the faW one has a -chance 
to average two colts in three years 
from each mare, which is better than 
getting only one colt In two years. 

Oftentimes the mare suckling a fall 
colt Is not needed for work through 
the winter and the mare and colt can 
run out through the day. This re- 
lieves one of the necessity of having 
t~~ ! to keep the colt shut in a box-stall 
tthe farm woodlot. since the necessary , whlle the mftre ls at work n9 ln the 
labor can for the most part be per- 1 case ^j, the gprlng ^^ Alao g^e 
formed in the winter, or at other stainons stand at » reduced fee In 
times when the farm work is slack, j the fall. 
War conditions make it especially > * j 



How far must the average farmer 
in the United States haul his crop 
to market? Exactly six and a half 
miles, it can be answered, for the bu- 
reau of crop estimates of the depart- 
ment of agriculture has completed an 
Inquiry into the whole matter of farm 
hauling throughout the country. In- 
cidentally, the results of the inquiry 
show that if only one wagon were 
available to haul crops it would re- 
quire about 15,747,000 days for it to 
Complete Ihe~3oD Tor only the mar- 
keted portion of three moat prominent 
farm products — wheat, corn and cot- 
ton. 

The investigation shows that It re- 
quires about half a day for the aver- 
age farmer to make a round trip to 
market, and about two-thirds of a day 
on the average for the farmers farth- 
est from market to make a similar 
trip. That market distances are grow- 
ing shorter is shown by the fact that 
in 1906 it required almost 50 per cent 
more time for the average round trip. 
One reason for the improved condi- 
tions, it is pointed out, is that since 
1900 the steam railroad mileage in 
the United States has increased 15 per 
cent and that many new freight-cur- 
rying electric lines have been built. 

Another point brought out by the 
Inquiry is that there hus been marked 
improvement in public roads since the 



Well-Cared for Woodlot. 



Important that the farm woodlot be 
utilized to the fullest at this time in j 
particular as a source of fuel. Coal I 
'Is high and scarce and even govern- j 
imcnt intervention cannot Insure an j 
[adequate supply throughout the win- | 
Iter on account of labor and trans- j 
iportation difficulties. Every cord of j 
fuel wood that is used will relieve ! 
the tension by just that much, and j 
©very farmer who can do so will 
doubtless find it to be to his advan- 



GOOD COLD WEATHER TROUGH 



Automatically Fed Device Is Protected 

Against Freezing— Controlled by 

Float Vatve. 



The idea of this Invention is to pro* 
vide an automatically fed trough that 
will be protected against freezing, 
writes O. J. Lynde in Farmers' Mail 
and Breeze. The cut shows a trough 

tage to put In a good supply of cord- j especially adapted for hogs. It ls sunk 

wood for himself, and to sell to oth- I 

ers wherever possible. Many farmers j 

owning woodlots within hauling dis- j 

tance of towns and cities are now ; 

finding a profitable sale for cordwood j 

In large quantities. 



•EFFICIENT SCALY LEG CURE 



Insects Which Cause Trouble Can Be ! 

Killed by Application of Sulphur 
' % and Lard. 





Modern Farm "Cafeteria" Gives Pig 
Chance to Make Hog of Himself 
in Short Space of Time. 
• 
In these days when labor is high 
and also scarce on many farms, the 
hog may afford "a way out." Hogs 
utilize refuse and waste grains, dam- 
aged grains, and garbage; garnering 
grain behind cattle or shattered 1 grain 
In harvest fields; and utilizing slaugh- 
terhouse by-products and dairy by- 
products Thev are also largely self- 
feeders. The modern farm "cafeteria" 
gives a pig a chance to make a hog 
of himself more quickly than he I-*- 
by the haul-fed route, and it has the 
added" "merit o£3«lng the cheapest 



ROAD- 

BUILDING 



HURRY GOOD ROADS BUILDING 




Hog Watering Trough. 



Healthy and Vigorous Porkers. 

way of producing pork. A sow when 
she is not developing a litter or nurs- 
ing pig s, can in summer time be 
placed in a pasture and given very 
little grain. In winter, possibly the 
cheapest maintenance ration is a com- 
bination of grain and hay, such as 
corn, wheat, rye or barley, and alfalfa, 
clover, cowpeas or soy bean hay. The 
grain should be limited to one or two 
pounds per hundred pounds live 
weight per day. Sows should be given 
all the hay they will clean up. 

MARKETING OF BR00D~S0WS 



Poultry kept in dirty houses often is ' almost entirely in the ground and is 
troubled with coarse scales" on the ■ fed-by-nplpe fro m belo w . This pipe 
legs. These are due to the presence j ls controlled by a float valve 



of mites, which hnve burrowed be- 
neath the scales. They are air breath- 
ing insects, and the treatment consists 
In depriving them of air. This is done 
by applying a mixture of equal parts 
of sulphur and lard, two or three 
times. It ls a simple remedy, but an 
efficient one. A free application of 
an ointment made by mixing a tea- 
spoonful of coal oil with a teacupfol 
of lard, will bring relief, and should 
in a short time work a cure. 



WHY RAISE LIVE STOCK? 

Because the by-products of 
live stock are from year to year 
advancing in prices and promise 
to continue to in advance. 
Among them are wool and hides. 

Because no permanent system 
of agriculture is likely to be 
adopted if the farmer does not 
base that on the growing of live 
stock, in part. It Is the lack of 
a permanent system that has led 
to the exhaustion of our soil, 
both as to its plant food and as 
to its humus. 

Because the raising of live 
stock enables the farmer to util- 
ize his pastures, which, rightly 
handled, are among the most 
profitable ucres on his farm. 



The trough has a cover, slightly 
raised above the water level and short- 
er 'than the trough. The space be- 
tween the end of the cover and the 
wall of the trough provides enough 
room for the animals. The water con- 
stantly coming through the burled pipe 
and the air space beneath the cover 
prevents freezing. The device is said 
to have proved successful ln a temper- 
ature of 20 degrees below zero. 



SELF-SUCKING HARD TO CURE 

Cows Having Acquired This Habit 

Will Get Around Almost Any 

Means for Prevention. 

Self -sucking is one of the worst hab- 
its a cow can have and one of the most 
difficult to cure. Most cows that have 
this habit will get around almost any 
means for prevention except kept ln a 
stanchion, or tied with a short halter. 
Unless a cow ls especially valuable 
that has this habit the sooner she Is 
sent to the block the better. It Is not 
caused by any lack of feed or sub- 
stance in the ration and cannot be 
cured through feeding or any other 
way that Is known of. A cow with the 
habit always seems to retain It. 



Concrete Road In Mississippi. 

bureau's Investigations in 1906, for 
the size of the average load hauled 
has nearly doubled since then. A day's 
haul of w hea t I n 1900 was 56 bu sh e ls; 
now it is 112 bushels.* In 1906 1,700 
pounds of cotton was hauled ln a 
day; now the average dally haul is 
3,000 pounds. 



are the smallest but the most valu- 
able. Thus the average value of a 
load of cotton was found to be $183, 
wheat $43 and corn $28. The longest 
hauls were found to be in the Rocky 
mountain states, where Nevada holds 
the record with an average haul for 
all farmers of 18 miles. The shortest 
hauls were shown to be ln the middle 
West, Ohio at the bottom of the list 
with four miles. 



Good Animals Sometimes Sacrificed 

When Little Forethought Would 

Cause Retention. 

At this time the marketing of a 
sow that can be or has been bred ls 
fairly comparable to "killing the goose 
that laid the golden egg." Although 
the fecundity of swine ls well appre- 
ciated by farmers, at times sows are 
sacrificed when a little forethought 
would cause them to be retained. 
Breeding sows multiply five or six 
times as rapidly as other meat anl- 
mals. They have an average litter of 
five or six pigs and may be bred twice 
a year, although three times in two 
years accords more with current farm 
practice. The litters Increase in size, 



The inquiry developed the fact that 
the loads hauled in the cotton country L°n the average, until sows are five or 

six years old. However, a large pro- 
portion of the sows are sold after pro- 
ducing one or two litters and before 
they have reached the period of great- 
est productivity. 



VALUE OF SILAGE FOR SHEEP 



Country to Profit In Future From 

Highways Built as Necessity of 

Warfare and Defense. 

It is the general opinion. of motor- 
ists arriving In Washington from all 
parts of the country that the war 
with Germany Is acting as a sharp 
prod to speed up road building. 

Whatever the war costs the nation 
ln dollars and lives, it will result ln 
the building of thousands of miles of 
usable roads in all sections, for these 
highways are now rated as one of the 
necessities of warfare and defense, 
says Washington Star. 

Possibilities of an invasion are re- 
mote, but now that it has been decid- 
ed to send an expeditionary force 
abroad. It Is certain that other thou- 
sands will follow, hence the mobiliza- 
tion of trooos on the seaboard Is some- 
thing nor tor at overlooked. 

Railroads are up to their ears in 
other work and have shown their lack 
of equipment to meet ordinary de- 
mands of a period of fast growth and 
an attendant Increase of consumption. 
So other means may have to be relied 
npon to hustle the boys In khaki to the 
ports, whence they will sail for the 
front. For this purpose the motor ve- 
hicle Is ready, and all it needs to add 
to its wonderful record of efficiency ln 
a pinch ls a system of roads which can 
be traveled ln safety and at speed dur- 
ing all seasons. 

Here on the East, where the tropps 
will be massed before sailing, goo4 
roads are considered as of vital Inter- 
est to the nation Just as the raising 
of vegetables in fields and yards which 
heretofore have produced nothing. 

Throughout the Atlantic area the 
road builders are hard at It, and, In 
spite of the urgency of the calls for 
men for other purposes, help Is being 
enlisted ln the cause. 

An immense amount of road building 
work is being done in the South, and 
in the Central West thousands of miles 
of roads are under way, these forming 
the • connecting link and making pos- 
sible hurried trips If such are needed. 
Exp e rt s p oi nt ou t that a 
take an army of 100,000 men frbin the 
Middle West to Jfaw York in less time 
.than can the railroads, und when the 
highways are improved a great cut 



emm 




CHOOSING SITE FOR ORCHARD 

Great Caution Should Be Exercised In 
Selecting Location— Sell la Most 

Important 

A person planning to set out an or- 
chard in the future should exercise! 
great caution in choosing the site* 
because his success depends largely: 
npon It. The first thing to consider la 
the soli. He should examine both the 
surface* and the subsoil as to the 
sourness and the ease of working and; 
fertility. He should examine the sur- 
face and the sub-drainage. 

Another Important point that few 
people consider Is the air drainage., 
If the orchard ls at the foot of a long: 
slope it ls more liable to frost dam- 
age. It ls also Important which way 
the orchard slopes. If it ls so the 
sun can shine directly upon it to tne> 
early morning the frost is apt to do 
more injury. The slope also has 
much to do with the coloring and] 
ripening of the frulL The land should 
not slope toward the prevailing wind 
because the winds will do the trees! 
much Injury. 

Not of the least importance are thai 
windbreaks. Do not select a alto) 
where cedar trees are near, as they) 
harbor the apple rust. You also must) 
consider who owns IL because your* 
neighbor may not choose, to leave its' 
there. If a prospective orchardlsrf 
will consider these points carefully 
he ls sure of success as far as alts] 
Is concerned. / 



BORERS HARM APPLE TREES 



If Round-Headed Variety Is Nat D+4 

strayed at Once They Often- 

Destroy Trae Entirely. 



tBy C. F. NIVEN, Clemaoa Agricultural! 
C o lUse . ) 



*i 



The borers rank among the most de^ 
structive enemies of the apple trees? 
There are two classes of them, the; 
round-headed borer, which works at 
the base of the tree, and the flat-head-j 
ed, which works well up on the trunk! 
and ln the crotches of large limbs. 

Round-Headed Borer.— The pre*j 
ence of this insect is usually detected) 
at the base of the tree by the little! 
pile of sawdust castings thrown out 
from an opening through the bark Into 
its burrow. Often, several borers cad 
be found ln one tree. This borer works 
near the base of the trunk, burrowing 
up and down, often going below the: 
surface of the soil. The burrow be- 
gins in the bark and sap wood, but 
soon extends for several Inches into 
the solid wood, often reaching the. 



BIG GOOD ROADS DIVIDENDS 



GOOD MIXTURE FOR POULTRY 



Blue Ointment and Vaseline or Lard 

Rubbed on Fowls Will Keep Away 

External Parasites. 



ATTENTION TO C ALF PAYS 

Rather Difficult Task to Feed Milk, 

Grain and Hay Regularly, but 

It Is Profitable. 



Motorists of Massachusetts Spent $25,- 

000,000 Last Season, as Result 

of Good Roads. 

MotoristSyspent $25,000,000 ln Massa- 
chusetts last season, largely as a re- 
sult of the good roads of that state. 
Rather a fine dividend! 

Great progress has been made ln im- 
proving the roads In Minnesota, but 
there are communities which as yet, 
apparently, see but one side to the 
good roads question, and that is, cap- 
ital going out and no dividends com- 
ing back. While the returns from 
motor travel are indirect, neverthe- 
less they are certain. It ls obvious 
that any town is at least indirectly 
benefited by having such good roads 
that motorists delight ln making it an j 
objective on their week-end tours. 

Any district that has bad roads be- 
comes jnst ns well known, but of 
course adversely. Unfortunately, too 



Reduces Cost of Raising Animal and 
Supplies Succulence, Palatability 
and Variety. 

The addition of silage to rations for 
all classes of sheep reduces their cost 
and supplies succulence, palatability 
and variety. Likewise, rotten, moldy, 
sour or frozen silage should not be 
used. Pregnant ewes should receive 
from three to four pounds per head 
daily during the winter. This should 
be supplemented with two or three 
ounces per head dally of cottonseed 
cake and some hay. After the lambs 
are born silage increases the milk 
flow of the ewes. In the fattening of 
lambs and yearlings for market the 
cheapest gains have usually been 
made when silage constituted a part 
of the ration. Rams winter well on 
silage as a part of their feed. 




Concrete Road in Maryland. 

will be made in the running time of 
the motor curs. 

The West ls not overlooking any- 
thing in the way of road building. 
There is not a state in which it Is not 
one of the big movements, even in a 
part of the country which is least af- 
fected. 

What Virginia Ib doing is being un- 
dertaken in greater or less degree by 
many Eastern states. 



HIGH QUALITY ALFALFA HAY 



win the war. 



j Don't forget to dose the hens and 
'chicks, after feathering, with an oint- 
ment made of equal parts of blue 
ointment and vaseline or lard care- 
fully mixed together. Rub this thor- 
oughly onto the skin under each wing 
and alao a little below the vent of 
each bird, using a portion of the oint- 
ment the size of a small gralu of 
wheat for each of the ihree pluces, 
and half as much for a half grown *° nt "•*• *■• hen " aml vhlfkens 
re**. Repeat onca In two or three d *J" n < 1 U P°° ***_}*??* w , . r,u " "!!° 
Tula !• 4 »m rem* -iy for nil 
of external poultry parasite*, ex- 



it Is hard to feed calves their milk, 
grain and hay regularly and carefully 
twice a day and give them a drink, 
of water at noon and care for the many "&<*&* cases might be given.— 
other stock in the same way, but it j Minneapolis Journal 
pays. You will prosper and we will 



FEED NECESSARY FOR EGGS 

Help Hans *nd Chickens Along by 

Giving Them Skim Milk, Table 

, Waste and Grain. 



_ i^__. 






weed —da, tilva them skim milk, 
whey, buttermilk, (able and garden 
vasts and grain. Feed than well. 
■ggs art iQcraastof la price. 



Greatly Improve Road. 
By keeping a road drag and drag- 
ging the road along one's land after 
heavy rains the road may be greatly 
Improved. It Is an easy matter to 
have . an agreement so sack farmer 
will drag the road In front of his 
farm. This would maintain the road 
till the regular hands could be called 
out nt Muted Intervals or till the com- 
BlBsiooaf could make the repairs 



Sixteen Fout Roadway. 
Maintain at least u l&fuot road- 
way. 



Very Necessary to Lower Cost of Car- 
rying Brood Sow Through 
Winter; Feed in Rack. 



Alfalfa hay of a high quality, which 
may be supplied in a rack, for brood 
sows ls very necessary to lower the 
cost of carrying her through the win- 
ter. In the alfalfa hay we not only 
get a large amount of calcium which 
is so essential and which Is deficient 
In wheat, bran, shorts and barley, but 
we get a large' amount of protein of 
the right kind. She must not be ex- 
pected, however, to live on alfalfa 
alone, aa that la too bulky. It should 
be supplemented with a small allow* 
ance of e on e entra tes dally. Thin may 
be In the form of barley, wheat, 
*horta, etc,, or bettfr thuu thoow alone 
la a mtxrar* or hurley and aborts, for 
Instance In equal parts. 



HIGH VALUE OF GOOD ROADS 

Estimated Cost of $900,000,000 to Got 
' / Surplus Farm Products to Mar- 
ket or to Railroad. 

After careful Inquiry it has been 
found that the average haul of the 
American farmer In getting his prod- 
uct to market or to the nearest ship- 
ping station is 12 miles, and the aver- 
age cost of hauling over the common 
country roads is 25 cents a ton per 
mile, or $3 a ton for a 12-mile haul. 
An estimate places the total tons 
hauled at 300,000,000 a year. On the 
estimate of $3 a ton for 12 miles this 
would make the total cost of getting 
the surplus products of the farm to 
the local market or to the railroad no 
less than $900,OQO,000— a figure greater 
than the operating expenses of all the 
railroads of the United States. If any- 
thing could make an argument for 
good wagon roads this statement sure- 
ly may. 



Litter In Hen House. 
Litter kept on the floor of the poul- 
try house should be removed when- 
ever it becomes damp and filled with 
droppings that do not dry. White- 
washed walls make the poultry bouse 
lighter and more sanitary. 



Patching Old Gravel Read. 
I'utchlng dune in (he proper utuuaer 
when the road ls wot, followed by a 
road drug, will inuiiituiu aa old gravel 
road surface aa good aa new until it Is 
so badly worn that an entirely new sur- 
face la required. 



Castings of Round-Headed Borer. 

heart of small trees. If the borer* 
are not destroyed they often become sqj 
numerous as to destroy the tree en- 
tirely. 

Flat-Headed Borer. — This Insect la 
found on the upper portion of the, 
trunk of the tree and in the crotch of 
large limbs. While the damage donqj 
by it is sometimes very great, yet It la 
hardly so destructive as the roundi 
headed borer. This borer does not goj 
ln so deep as the round-headed, yet It 
sometimes girdles a limb and even the* 
trunk. Healthy trees are rarely at* 
tacked by this borer. Therefore farm- 
ers who are careful with their trees} 
need not fear it to any. great extent. I 



MICE INJURE FRUIT TREES 



Excellent Hiding Place Afforded by Pil- 
ing Loose 80II Around Base- 
Keep It Smooth. 

_____ I- 

Mice are likely to make nests around 
the trunks of trees, provided they; 
have loose material at the base of the) 
trees ln which to make a nest If thai 
young orchard ls plowed, the loose soil) 
turned up against the base of the trees! 
makes an excellent hiding place ton 
mice. Soil ought to be scraped barel 
and smooth around the base of thei 
trees ao no loose soil, weeds, grass, or 
litter can collect and enable the mice} 
to neat close to tho trunks where they; 
will eat through the growing layer, 
thus girdling the tree. This precaution 
should be taken whether wrappers arc 
used or not, aa mice frequently bar- 
row to beneath the wraupera, if tho 
ami is loose, sod find shelter behind) 
tbf wrapper. _ 



\ 



BBJH 



___— ___ H _ M __ BM ____ MB _ a _ H 



* "»■ 



/ 



mmm—mm** 



mmmmmm 



HI! 



wwmmmm 



mmmm 



mmmmm 



■"■■■ 



JL «. . 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vol. XXXXHI 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 31, 1918. 



$1.50 Per Year 



No 18 



It 




SMARTNESS IN THE ARMY. 
One of the best lessens a soldier 
learns, coming blow to those of dis- 
cipline and orderly action. Is tlmt of. 
"smartness." Indeed this may be set 
Sewn os part of discipline, and for 
that reason in till the great training 
camps the youug men, newly from civil 
life, are getting advice and instruction 
on the point, says Omaha *Bee. It 
means that the soldier must be care- 
ful of his personal appearance, avoid- 
ing slouchlness In dress or demeanor 
as he would the plague. The moral ef- 
ifect of this is direct and easily recog- 
~nlzed. The "smart" soldier Is a good 
^soldier, and reflects In his bearing and 
I attitude the lessons of his training, 
i He la alert, resourceful, and In all 
jwaya dependable uud efficient. The 
{American army does not stress this be- 
jyond reason, for It Is traditional to re- 
Itafc as much of the Individual quali- 
fies of the men as Is compatible with 
need for concerted acrron. This pol- 
icy has been of Immune value In devel- 
oping self-reliance and Initiative, the 
ichlef characteristic of the American 
j soldier. Proper relaxation essential 
to personal comfort Is always permit- 
ted, and the combination of this ele- 
ment with that of disciplinary routine 
produces the beat lighting organization 
the world has ever known. 



REGISTRANTS CLASSIFIED Hi « h Seh001 Honor Ro " 



Italy must be supplied with all the 
things necessary to keep It in the field. 
It must have food and fuel and steel. 
It Is estimated that It needs 145,000 
tons of shipping a month. We can sup- 
ply much of this now, and probably 
jail of it before very long. Italy occu- 



pies an Important position upon enemy 



territory, and a continuance of Its cam- 
paign will force Austria to its knees, 
and that will mark the end for Ger- 
many. Italy's resources are not great, 
but its drives at Austria must not be 
allowed to Blacken, and it~ we cannot 
give Italy all It needs Immediately, we 
.can supply it with enongh to keep It 
actively In the field. 



The totul stocks of frozen poultry 
reported by 254 storages ou October 1, 
1917, amounted to 42,725,515 pounds, 
while the total stocks reported on Sep- 
tember 1, 1&17, amounted to 51,830,157 
pounds. The reports of 189 storages 
| show stocks of 33.077.6S5 pounds on 
lOctober 1, 1917, as compared with 20,- 
{041,121 pounds on October 1. 1916, an 
Increase of 68 per cent. The reports 
show that the stocks decreased 19.5 per 
cent during September, 1917, while 
they Increased 29.5 per cent during 
-September, 1916. 



i Folks who are objecting to the high 
'cost of sugar ought to remember that 
ifor 200 years after It became general- 
fly known it was chiefly employed in 
ithe arts and sciences, being regarded 
jtoo~v*Tuabie ronfood. in moo sugar 
was selling for 31 cents a pound. The 
evolution of sugar from a luxury to 
fa necessity has come within a century. 



i The war has caused the college pro- 
cessors to enter practical fields. Many 
•re serving the government. Some 
are connected with great corporations. 
'A railroad has made one of them u di- 
i rector. The time may come when a 
iprofessor will be known by the jingle 
of ten-dollar gold pieces in his pocket. 



! The man who declares that to worry 
lis as sinful as to drink never had a 
(house to keep on high food prices, a 
valuable chauffeur commandeered by 
'the draft or a growing child to bring 
'up, or he would know that It can't be 
helped. 



A desire on the part of soldiers' 
wives to follow their husbands to 
Prance represents admirable sentl- 
iinent. But under the .circumstances 
^they will be expected to stny at home 
|and attend to their knitting. 



List of Boone County Boys Who 

Have Been Placed in Class 

One by District Board. 



>g registrants in 
have been 



! A Wisconsin artillery sergeant was 
presented with a $1,000 swagger stick 
on his birthday. Isn't It queer what 
ridiculous things a committee can buy 
with other people's money? 
| . 



The folio win 
Boone county have been placed 
in Class One. fThere are several 
who have not been classified as 
yet, while there are several 
names yet before the District 
Board at Lexington. This Hat is 
ccorrect w> Tar as the local draft 
board is able to report at tha 
present time : 
Order No. 

C. G Keed, 

Hugh Kyle. 

Kirtlcy Steele, colored. 

C. M Waller 

Rafe Koons. 

Albert Htrade.*, colored 

Joseph Allen 

P. R Klasernei 

H. W. Afterkirk 

C. V. Barlow, 

Paul Damrath^ 

C. B Robinson. 

R. W Hager. 

Elmer Chapman 

H. J Aylor, 

L. D James,. 

C. E Miller, 

Albert Grimsley. 

Hazci Popham 

Pearl Kite. 

J. S. Pennington, 

O. E Souther. 

Lee Stephens. 

Hobe Conrad. 

R. R Robbins. 

ft H tiros* 

A. Q Powers. 

Guy Webster. 

Wm. Johnson, colored 

W. R Berkshire 

Edward Zwick. 

Oscar Dennigan. 

W. H Carpenter. 

Robert Koons. 

Charlio O'Hara. 

Charles Richards 

A. L Northcutt 

Geo. Sleet, colored 

A. L Stephens 

W. H Grimsley 

W. C, Greene, 

Mnnley Gutxey. 

Claude Arrasmith. 

Sug Sturgeon. 

R. A Thompson 

T. J Garrison. 

Amos Bradford, colored. 

A. R Blackburn 
M. L, Wasson 
L. C Scott 
Edward Jackson. 
J. R Miskell 
P. L. Kelly 
Marvin Johnson. 
R. E Sprague 
J. W, Youell 
T. O Edwards 
W. R Horton 
W. J Black. 
H. S Hamilton 

B. P Baker 
J. T, Roberts 

C. A. Renaker. 
Edward Mullens. 
Edward Miller, 
J. R Carpenter 
W. H Wlngate 
W. Akins 

D. C Pittmann 
Leroy Beach 

E. E Rust 
Claud Roberts. 
Sandford Bristow. 
Owen Weaver, colored 
C. R Baker, colored 
Sam Holt. 

C. P Swim 
E. Tuny ate 
Goo. Humphrey 
L. Tanner 
H. ,B Waller 

D. R Stone 
O. <R Russ 
W. B Abdon 

E. R Wallace 
N. PB Northcutt. 
P. J Sayre ' 
R. C McGlasson 

F. A Dringenhurg 
R. C Craig 
W; H Pressor 
Jos. Smith 
L. Ia Stephens. 
Henry Binder. 
E. H Carpenter. 

Ibert Sharpe. 
<?. J. Akins 
H. H. Ruche 
Ben Early. 
W. E Heist. 
B. Shinkie, 
Garrison 
P.. Hughes 

Pennington. 

Chapman. 

Ryle 

Carpenter. 

Gaines 

Black 

Thompson. 



j The man who is so stifTneeked that 
be will never surrender his opinion 
when there are men who know better 
is more apt to be a Jackals than a 

Solomon. 

; , N . 

! There's many a mother who ts glad 
;her boy la little; there's many a daddy 
who's glad his boy la big. That is just 
the man und the woman of it. 



Astrologer" MU 'he mat will Iftst un- 
til 1919. But It l» not the utars but 
heavy artillery Whleh Will be tin ditur 
.mining factor lu thN war. 

The years may paralyse a man's tn- 
ttfSSt lu SSSSbsll, but pie 
politic* will k'iumUi u nsjalnn with bus 
to the last brent b 



38 

25 

58 

66 

73 

.§ 

82 

88 

99 

118 

122 

144 

170 

181 

184 

190 

200 

201 

202 

204 

205 

210 

214 

216 

217 

219 

222 

223 

226 

227 

228 

230 

234 

237 

238 

239 

240 

242 

247 

254 

259 

26tr 

263 

264 

268 

H70 

281 

283 

28C 

298 

299 

301 

303 

307 

310 

312 

314 

317 

318 

323 

332 

334 

335 

336 

337 

340 

341 

343 

341 

356 

360 

362 

363 

366 

368 

369 

370 

371 

373 

37.-. 

378 

381 

382 

390 

39ti 

402 

40k 

407 

416 

427 

429 

430 

435 

436 

441 

44 

45i 

451 

466 

467 

476* 

481 

487 

497 

501 

502 

503 

504 

505 

506 

507 

509 

510 

511 

523 

524 

527 

531 

534 

547 

550 

552 

55C 

562 

565 

571 

579 

5S4 

588 

,.94 
599 
602 
ri04 
111 
..20 
i»3J 
t.teO 
o7j) 

od hint 



"Burlington High School Honor 
Roll for December, 1917 ■ 
HIGH School.— 

Elizabeth KHly. 

Helen Stephenson. 
1 n termediate. — 

Arthur Maurer, 

Wendel Phipps, 

Mildred Cook. 
Primary.— 

Catherine Huev, 

Dorotha McMulb>n. 

Edgar Matirer, 

Mary Nichols. 
In High School the mid-term 
examinations have just been held. 
Several pupils were exempt from 
examinations in one or more stud- 
ies, two being excused from all. 
To be exempt from a final exam- 
ination a pupU must make an 
average of 90 per cent in that sub- 
ject and also 90 per cent in de- 
portment. 

The majority of our pupils have 
worked hard and deserve much 
credit, but some have been inter- 
ested in other things more than 
their books. These pupil* hate 
made low grades, and, in some In- 
stances have failed. To accom- 
plish much in High School a pu- 
pil must put in at least two hours 
and a half every night in pre- 
paration for the next day's work. 
That means no loafing in the post- 
office or stores, no parties or 
dances during the week. If the 
parents will see to it thn 1 ^ their 
children do this the school work 
will be more successful. I am 
asking that the parents refuse 
to let their children give or at-4 
tend parties during the school 
week. Without this coopcra'.fjun 
the school work will sui'fer. 

Let all work together for a 
more efficient school. If parents, 
teachers and pupils will work 
toward that end there will be no 
doubt of the results. The word 
cooperation spells effie'encv. thern 
fore let us cooperate. 

J. A CAYWOOD 

FORTY YEARS AGO TODAY 

Items Taken From the Issue of 
The Recorder of Janua- 
ry 31st, 1878 



EAGER FOR FRAY 

Heroic Spirit of Sons of the Blue 

Grass State Is Shown In Some 

Typical Instances. 

Louisville, (Jan. 24 —The spirit 
which moved a sailor of the tor- 
pedoed American destroyer, Jacob 
Jones, to shout to other sailors 
who were struggling with him in 
the sea, "Oh, boy ! where do we 
go from here?'' is paralleled in in- 
stances among Kentucky drafted 
men. ' 

Ruby W. Franlin, a school teach 
er of Madisonville, turned in a 
questionnaire of sixteen pages 
with a general answer of nine 
words. "1 want no exemption • Tell 
Pershing I'll be there." he wrote 
across the face of the document. 

Dave Haley, a-yw«»»« *t~" ~" qf 
Hawesville, according', to press 
reports, \was quite as expressive 
when he said, "I'm ready for ser- 
vice and rarin' to go." 

Henry Dehaven Moorman of Har 
dinsburg, Commonwealth Atty., of 
Breckenridge countv, indicated his 
attitude when he said he didn't 
want (to be an officer." Anxietv 
to enter the army led him to 
Washington, where he enlisted the 
services of Senator Ollie James to 
expedite his acceptance in order, 
that he might "yet into the thick 
est oi the fight in France" at the 
earliest moment. Senator James 
presented \ him to Atjutant Gen- 
eral McCain to whom the Ken- 
tuckian made his simple request 
Although well over the draft aye, 
he pa ss ed 4he-exanaination inci- 
dent to enlistment, promptly was 
assigned to the Tenth Field Ar- 
tillery and ordered to Camp 
Green, North Carolina for train- 
ing. 

These isolated eases, however, 
perhaps are overshadowed by the 
patriotic fervor in two Kentucky 
counties. In Larue the Army Ex- 
emption Board recently announc- 
ed that every man subject to the 
first draft had been physically fit 
and that nono had claimed " ex- 
emption. 

In ■Breathitt, the f orme, home 



Grass »;>ed are being sowed. 

• *•* 

Some farmers have thrn,- plow- 
ing well advanced. 

• * * » 

Died of consumption at Walton 
on thr> 18th Nellie Murphy. 
» » * * 

Phil Watson, wife murder will 
be hung in Covington tomorrow. 

• » » » 

L. S Pope was appointed ad- 
ministrator of R. D Jones 



a 

H 

s 

R 
W. 

E, 
L. 



C. 
R. 
J. 
J. 
J. 
E. 
fc. 
H. 
I. 

C. E Damefon 
P. H Honsley 

D. M Dav 

J. B F, Herd. 

Wm. Bums 

Lee Abdon. 

R. M. TewelX 

C. Dickerson 

K. M. Stamper 

Q. T. Fisher. 

V. J Bell 

M, O'Hara, Jr. 

K. Kirkpatrick 

J. M. Hanee 

Wm. Kennedy 

Clyde- Anderson. 

C. J Brink 

B, a ATia 

Wm. Dringenbery 

Leas WillLmiH. 

W. S Mitch. U 

llaluim Cloro. 

<\ <i Kellv 

<\ H Jenkins 

J. T WUliomn 

F. A ('aniin 

McUnrVey Online <-ol 

H. M I|«n 

Bryan Snow. 

"now UilUim ■otxtuii o|tmi< 
1'niiraduy aiUrnooa, 



Small grain looks well. 

• * » » 

Last Tuesday Mr. Add Huev, or 
this county, and Miss Milter, 
of Covington,, were married. 

• » * » 

Five acre soi land adjoining the 
town oi' Burlington was sold by 
Harrison Hawkins to Jordon BeaH 
in 18k7 £ f«or $500. 

• » ♦ • 

John Harpor, 23 died at Hibron. 

• • » « 

The financial condition of the 
county published in this issue of 
the Recorder showed that claims 
to the amount oi $3,523.39 was paid 
by the county in 1878. The countv 
poll tax for 1879 was fixed at $2. * 

Quiet Days at Franofort. 

News from Frankfort is to the 
effect that Mr. Crowe, the .Speak- 
er of the House, is doing much, 
by a series of fair rulings, to 
prevent the uprisal of that spirit 
of insurgency that repeatedly 
brought the last House !:o the 
verge of riot. 

Mr. Crowe is not attempting to 
assume the role of a dictator, 
while his action opposing the 
odious rule requiring a two-thirds 
vote to get a bill out of the 
hands oi the Rules Committee 
commends itself to all fairminded 
men. 

In view of the placidity that 
now prevails at Frankfort there 
are numerous predictions that 
this will ~be a very "dull" session. 
It may bo a dull session, but there 
is no reason why it should not 
prove a useful session. Tho Legis- 
lature has already ratified the na- 
tional prohibition amendment, as 
it was a foregone conclusion that 
it would do. It is certain that it 
wilt without serious difference of 
opinion, submit to . the j>eople 
an amendment providing a vote 
in November, 1919, upon the ques- 
tion of State-wide prohibition. It 
is equally certuin, it may be 
said, that unless there is a change 
in public sentment that amend- 
ment will lx» ratified by a large 
majority. We assume that the Log 
lslature will pass an anti-shipping 
bill; at any rate such a bill will 
not bo killed in committee. 

Chancoa for violent disagree 
roents over tho liquor question 
are, therefore, grestly minimised. 
Why, then, cannot the Legislature 
set to work in earnest to frame 
a budget system for the State, 
and take the necessarv steps pro 
limlnary to overhauling tho Stats'l 
'-durational syetom? The Waters 
are indeed SO smooth at the j.res- 

••nt Uir*\ that there nrvmaayvho 

believe it to l>e only a calm thai 

l>r*H»"i,* ., storm. \ M>\\ may 

ul 'MM m theother 



ii* 



~" — "•—.-"■—•. >"Q »im«.-.- l ll l l l ll- 

oi leuds and bloodshed, there 
wore no men of tho draft age 
subject to the first call, because 
they all had volunteered, the Ex 
emption Board said. 

Kentuckians and their brothers 
from Indiana and Southern Illinois 
to a total of more than 20,000, 
are in training at Camp Zacharv 
Taylor, the National Army Can- 
tonment on the edge of Louis- 
ville. Many of them bear tho 
stamp o; out-of-doors men from 
the mountains, and it is common 
comment, as they mingle with the 
crowds on the streets of Louisville 
on their two liberty davs each 
week, that they look fit for ser- 
vice in tho Titanic struggle just 
ahead o. - Uncle Sam's firhtine 
men. s 






The Path of tha Patriot 

Tho path that a sane American 
should (pursue in these times is 
; plainly visible. It is the path of 
; moderation, calm confidence, ceas- 
i less vigilance and earnestness to 
1 learn every fact that will contrib- 
ute to the success of the United 
States. The true patriot will be 
, rather silent than vocal. .He will 
! be busv sifting out the truth from 
I error. He will keep his eye on pub- 
lic officials and weigh them in 
the balance oi actual trial. When 
they have proved their unfitness 
he will do what he can to have 
them removed to a, place where 
where they .cannot do further dam- 
age, but in lopping off incompe- 
tence it is not necessary to* tear 
down tho structure that is betas? 
reared. , ° 

There is no occasion for depress- 
ion, just as there is no justifica- 
jiop for overconfidence. The Uni- 
ted States with its allies will de- 
feat Germany in the end ,for the 
good and sufficient reason that 
truth, right and liberty are reen- 
forced by superior strngth and re- 
sources. God is on the side of the 
heavy battallions, and the heavv 
battalhons are on the side ol 
liberty. The war is like a ,sea 
voyage, with its calms and storms. 
The tru American will keep his 
heart and (mind set on the end! 
of the voyage and the passing 
mishaps will not undulv depress 
him.— Washington Post 

And tho Wood Camo. 

Chaa. Fowler went to build a 
fire an his stove last Friday 
morning when, he discovered his 
supply of stove (wood was ex- 
hausted. He called to his friend, 
Lloyd Weaver, over on Gunpow- 
der and stated his trouble, when 
Weaver told him to go back to 
bed and he would bring him a 
load at once. Mr. Fowler return- 
ed to his downey couch, antic- 
ipating at least half a day's good 
sleep, and you may imagine hia 
surprise when Mr. Weaver ar- 
rived with a load of wood in 
time (or him to have hia meal 
served only a few minutes after 
the usual hour. 

Wheat Crop will Bo Great 

The great joy the farmers get 
from the continued snows is the 
condition it promises for wheat, 
rye, clover fields and meadows. 
Old rarmsxrs, my that IftheMsroh 
winds are not , too hi#h und cold 
the wheat crop will he great. Ths 
Increase in acreage feslur<« very 
largely nnd the posalbilUk* (Or 
•normoua had also. The March 
winds may play t: 
blowing th« dirt from srtiuno 

Sd and th*. heat Mint. 

th«> ssrlh.— Crsoc fBO owa Times, 



Snow Kept Them Busy. 

Joe Walton was in command of 
a road grader, six horses and a 
squad oi men that pushed the 
snow out of the road from the 
loot of the hill at Miss! Julin 
Dinsmore's to Burlington one day- 
last week. Squads of men in ev- 
ery (neighborhood hi the county 
put in much time trying to keep 
the highways in a passable condi- 
tion, as the snow was drifting 
all the time and drifts would 
appear over night on the 
identical spots from which 'they 
were removed the day before. In 
some roads that are not used 
much the drifts were so enormous 
|that no effort was made to move 
them, they covering long stretch- 
os of narrow road where it would 
have required a vast amount of 
labor and considerable time to 
get the snow out of the way. 
The snow served to domonstrate 
that ths people will turn out 
and work on the roads when they 
understand that is the only way 
to put them in condition for 
use. 



"SATAN TO WELHEIM" 

Published By Request. 

Wh°n Louis Syberki\>p, of Ores. 
ton, Iowa, wrote the satire on 
Kaiser Wilhelm, which follows, he 
little thought it would attract the 
attention which it has. Requests, 
for copies have come to him from 
Theodore RooseveJt, Secretary of 
the Navy Daniels, Secretary ' to 
the President Tumulty and otlu-r 
notables. The article is in th'» 
form of a letter from his San- 
tanic majesty to his human pro- 
prototype, U says: 
"To 'William von Hohenzollorn, 

King of Prussia, Emperor of all 

Germany and Envoy Extraordin- 
ary of Almighty God. 

'"My Dear Wilhelm: I can call 
you by that familiar name, for 1 
have always been very close to 
you— much closer than you could 
ever know. 

"From the time that youi'werei 
yet an undeveloped being in your 
mother's «womfb have I shaped 
your destiny for my purpose. 

"In the days of Rome I created 
a roughneck known in history as 
Nero. He was a vulgar character 
and suited my purpose at that 
particular t£me. In these modern 
days a classic demon and effi- 
cient 8upercriminal was needed, 
and as I know the Hohenzollern 
blood I picked you as my special 
instrument to place on earth an 
annex of hell. 

"I gave you abnormal ambition, 
likewise an oversnpply oj egotism 
that youjmight not discover your 
own failings; I twisted your mind 
to that of a madman with cer- 
tain normal tendencies to carry 
you by, a most dangerous char- 
acter placed in power; I gave 
you tho power of a hypnotist ana 
a certain magnetic force that you 
might sway your people. 

"I am responsible for the d;s. 
formed arm that hangs helpless 
on your left, for your crippled 
condition embitters your life 
and destroys all noble impulses 
that might otherwise cause .them 
anxiety, but your strong sword 
arm is driven by youe ambition 
that squelches all sentiment and 
pity; I placed in your soul a 
deep hatred of all things English, 
for of all nations on earth I hate 
England most; wherever England 
plants her flag she bring9 order 
out of chaos and the hated cross 
follows the Union Jack; under her 
rule wild tribes become tillers of 
the soil and in due time practical 
citizens; she is the great civilizer 
of the globe and f HATE HER. 
I planted in your soul a .*ruel ha- 
tred for your mother because SHE 
was English, and left my good 
friend Bismarck to fan the flame 
I had kindled. Recent history 
proves how weU our work was 
done. It brqke you royal mother's 
heart but I gained my purpose. 

"The inherited disease of the 
Hohenzollern > killed your father, 
just as it will kill you, and you 
became tho ruler of Germany ana 
a tool of mine sooner than I ox~ 
pected. 

"To assist you and farther has- 
ten my work, I sent you three 
evil spirits— Nietszche," Tritschke 
and later Bern ha rdi— whose teach 
ings inflamed the youths of Ger- 
many, who in good time would 
be willing and loyal subjects and 
teager to spill their blood and 
pull your chestnuts, yours and 
mine; the spell has been perfect 
—you cast your ambitious eyes to- 
ward the Mediterranean; Egypt, 
India and the Dardanelles, ana 
you began your great railway to 
Bagdad, but the ambitious arch- 
duke and his more ambitious wife 
stood in your way. 

"It was then that I sowed the 
se«d in your heart that blossomed 
into tho assassination of the 
duke and his wife, and all hell 
smiled when it saw how cleverly 
you saddled the crime on Serbia. 
I *a you set sails for the fords 
of Norway, and I knew you 
would prove an alibi. Now clever- 
ly done, so much like vour noble 
grandfather, who also secured an 
assassin to remove old King Fred 
'»rkk of Denmark, and later rob- 
bod that country of two provinces 
that gave Germany an opportun- 
ity to become a naval power. 
Murder Is dirty work, I ut p takes 
a Hohenzolkrn to make away and 
get by. 

"Ywir opportunity was at hand: 
you sot the world mi fire and 
bells of hell were ringing; your 
i«|H« on Belgiun i much Joy. 

is the >«'{tnnmfr, the founds- 
'»ii wart*; 
th*» d«-v neo- 

rals ami works of 

uit mum hulled , hi tha 



infernal regions. 

"You made war bn friends and 
foe alike and the murder of civit* 
ians showed my teachings had 
borne fruit. Your treachery to- 
ward neutral nations hastened a 
universal upheaval, the thing I 
most desired. Your undersea war> 
fare is a master stroke, from the 
smallest mackerel pot to the great . 
Lusitania you show no favorite**; 
as a war lord you stand supreme 
for you have no mercy ; you have 
no consideration for the baby 
clinging to its mother's breast as 
they both go down into the deep 
together, only to be torn apart 
and leisurely devoured by sharks 
down among the coral9. 

"I have strolled *>vor the bat- 
tlefields of Belgium and Prance, t 
have seen your hand oi destruc- 
tion everywhere; it's all your 
work, super-fiend that I made 
you. I have seen the fields of 
Poland, now a wilderness fit for 
prowling beasts only; no merry 
children in Poland now ; they all 
succumbed to frost and starvation. 

"I drifted down into Galacia, 
where formei-ly Jews and Gentiles 
lived happily together ; I founa 
but ruins and ashes; I felt .a 
curious pride in my pupil, for It 
was all above my expectation. 

"I was in Belgium when you 
drove the peaceful population be 
fore you like cattle into slavery; 
you separated man and wife ana 
forced them to hard labor in 
trenches. I have seen the most 
iu-ndish rap** committed on young 
women and those who were forc- 
ed into maternity were cursing 
the father of their offspring, andl 
I began to doubt if my own in* 
ferno was really up to date. 

"You have taken millions of dot 
lars -from innocent victims and 
called it indemnity; you have 
lived fat on the land youusurp-, 
ed and sent the real owners away 
to starvation. You havo strayed 
away from, all legalized war meth 
ods and introduced a code of your 
own. 

"You have killed and robbea 
the people of friendly nations and 
destroyed their property. You 
are a liar, a hypocrite and a 
bluffer of the highest magnitude. 
Y o u ai r e — a— part of mine and yet — 
you tnose as a personal friend) 
of God. Ah, Wilhelm, you are a v - 
wonder. You wantonly destroy all 
things in your path and leave 
nothing for coming generations. 

"I was amazed when I saw you 
form a partnership with the im- 
possible Turk, the chronic killer 
of Christians, and you a devout 
worshipper in the Lutheran] 
church. I confess, Wilhelm, you 
are a puzzle at times. A Mo- 
hammedan army, commanded by 
German officers, assisting one 
another in massacreing Christiana 
is a new line of warfare. 

"When a Prussian officer cad 
witness a nude woman being dis- 
emboweled by a swarthy Turk, 
commuting a double murder with 
one cut of his saber, and calmly 
stand by and see a house full of 
innocent Armenians locked up, the 
house saturated with oil and fired 
then my teachings did not stop 
with you, but have been extended 
to the whole German nation., 

I confess my aantanie sool grew 
sick and there and then T knew 
my pupjl had become the master, 
I am a back number, and my 
dear Wilhelm, I abdicate in your 
favor. The great key to hell will 
be turned over to you. The gavel 
that has struck the doom of dam- 
ned souls «ince time began is yours. 
I am satisfied with what I have ■ 
done; my abdication in your fa- 
vor is for the very best interests 
of hell— in future I am at your 
majesty's service. 

Affectionately and sincrely 

LUCIFER «. SATAN" 

Corn in Bod Shape. 

Persons who are in a position 
to know say that many of the 
cobs in the ears of corn are froz-< 
en, and when the cob thaws there 
is very great danger ' of much 
damage to the corn in the cribs. 
Finelooking, large ears are found 
to be in the condition above de- 
scribed and when the thaw comes 
they will soon become mushy and 
of no value, consequently it is 
believed that the corn now in 
the bulk is in condition to re- 
sult in great loss to the owners, 
as there is no way to overcome 
the trouble as the grain is more 
or less sappy. 

Kept Busy. 

Benj. Riley, chief clerk of the 
local draft board, has been a 
very busy individual for several 
weeks trying to get the classifi- 
cation of those subjected to mlf- 
itary duty in this county com- 
pleted as required by the war 
department. Crass No 1 has not 
been made up entirely as there 
are several appeals pending from 
the action of the local board. 

Getting Work Brittle. 

The season has arrived when the 
farmers get anxious about their 
work, and many years fan the past 
they have considerable plowing ■ 
done by this tune. February is 
a month in which considerable 
com land Is broken, and the far- 
mers will be ready to take ad- 
vantage of every day this month 
offers that is suitable for that 
kind of work. 

Ground Hog Day. 

Dsy after tomorrow Is ground 
hog day. It is hoped ths !tttie> 
fellow will give us a better month 
than either Dscembor or Jjifuury 
has hstttt. It rsmaios to bs **«*> 
If he will break up tha VfsKKrr 
business «« it has bsan conduct - 
l4 



; « 



• •« 



■■■IHP^rKaiiMm 



T 



mmmmmmm 



•THURSDAY, JANUARY to. 

rr . ' 



lf»18 



BOON! COUNTY RECORDER 



^WALTON DEPARTMENT.^ 

D. B. WALLACE, Manager. 

Hand vour news item* fco Mr. D. B. Wallace at the Walton Equita- 
ble Bank and Trust Co. *s building. He is also authorized to re- 
cieve subscriptions and collect other accounts. 



* 

* 



E. M Johnson came home from 
Frankfort last Saturday to re- 
sumo his position on the loose 
leaf market 



Mrs. J W Thomas who has been 
fll for several \ weeks is somewhat 
Improved. 

Dr E A Cram of Pecdletoo - 
eountv "spent the past «w>k ' Miss Eliaa Hanson o! ■ Williams- 
here with relative* and friends. , town who teaches the pubhc 

w ^ i « v.i „ „,,«!..■ i^on' sch ool at New Liberty, Owen-co., 
. Mrs. Ear Robinson who has been ^^J fc Saturday, en^ 

suffering from Mood poisonm^ J-£ L y ^ 

in heT hand is getting better. j h<yp wo ,, k 

AM Edwards spent Thursday, MisB j^ma Hunt had thft mls _ 
at Glencoe vUitms hisold fne»« . fortune to fall on tho icy pave . 
Rev. G \\, Hill who is ver y sick, ment Sunday, and has since been 

Arthur C. Roberts and JEUmtTr confined to her room at Judge 
Griffith of Verona, spent Monday J. Q Tomlin's residence, but no 
here with friends and on b usiness , serious results are anticipated. 

William Show of near "Burlms- . Dr. W, E. Fister. who has been 
ton, spent part «f the past week veterinary surgeon, has b?en 
here visiting his brother Enoch apt* practicing his profession as 
Snow i elected the County Veterinarian 

' , _ ... ,. , . f „,.,„ for Campbell county, and will pro b 

Samuel Sprac Jltng sold 1 m fa m ab , ^ al th ; . being Ms 
near Bracht Station last week home cotm tv 
to Benj. Hume who takes posses- R Q Hu? ^ John c B edinger 



Bnvtd The Weather. 



sion March 1st 

Mrs. Jos. B, Harris and little 
daughter of Chicago, arrived here 
last week on a visit to her par- 
ents Mr. and Mrs W. R. Rouse, 

George Allen of Sexton Creek. 
Owsley "county, spent last week 
here with his brother John Allen, 
and they spent the week at Met- 
amora, Ind., with relatives and 
friends. 

Heatless Monday has been ob- 
served the past two Mondays and 
all of the business houses have 
been qlosed those days in obed- 
ience to the request made by the 
government for the purpose of sav 
ing fuel. 

The third number of the Ly- 
ceum course will be given at the 
Walton school auditorium Friday 
night, Feb. 1st, consisting of a 
lecture by Prof. Maynard Lee 
Daggy of tho University of Wash- 
ington, 

Misses Queen and Willeve Till- 
man who have been helping in the 
religious work at the Rescue Mis- 
sion at Louisville, came home 
this week on a visit to their 
parents Mr, and Mrs, William H 
Tillman. 

Win. H Cram who has been in 
ill health for some time was ad- 
judged of unsound mind and was 
taken to the Lakeland Asylum 
for treatment this week believ- 
ing that th© treatment will im- 
prove his condition greatly. 

John Rensler of near Ri chwood, 
bough t a nearly neW Saxon tour- 
ing car from a party of tourists 
last week who were caught in 



and Chas. L." Griffith left Monday 
for Meridian, Mississippi, to look 
over a large body of laud that 
has recently been placed on the 
market, and may make an invest- 
ment. They expect to be gone 
about a week. 

Courtland P. Scott oi* Ghent, and 
Raymond M. Renaker of the San- 
ders Loose Leaf Tobacco Ware- 
house, attended the sales of to- 
bacco here Saturday. Their mar- 
ket has been very light as very 
littlo tobacco in that quarter has 
been stripped as yet. 

Miss Nell Williams who teaches 
ths primary grade in the Walton 
school has been ill the past week, 
and Miss Ruth Snyder of Peters- 
burg, has been filling her place. 
Miss Snyder expects to remain 
in the work hero for a while for 
the advantage of the experience. 

Rev. and Mrs Olua Hamilton 
returned here last Friday from a 
visit of about two months to rel- 
atives at their old home in Ten- 
nessee. Rev, Hamilton held ser- 
vices at the Baptist church last 
Sunday, being the pastor, and 
will hold regular services every 
Sunday. 

The Walton loose* leaf tobacco 
market had a very good sale last 
Saturday considering the quality 
of the tobacco, tho many were 
disappointed at the prices paid, 
yet it averaged along with the 
other markets, though none of 
them are up to the prices paid 
at the— beginning- u f t he ma so n. 
The offerings last Saturday 
amounted to oyer 117,000 pounds, 
and the prices ranged from 7 to 



j ... °. : aiiu me prices ranged from 7 to 

^riS™ n a P ^ en r to *!' » ^ft>. Jow Jades Staging 



Florida, and conclud|ed to com-* 

elete the balance of the journey 
y railroad. 

Mrs. J. M, Arnold is spending 
a couple of weeks at Westwood, 
Cincinnati, with her friend Mrs. 
Anna Cook who is ill. Miss Marie 
Arnold who has a position in Cin 
cinnati, came home to care for 
the house during the absence of 
her mother. 

J. M Rankin and C. A. Driscolf 
of Gleneoe, spent last Saturday 
here on the loose leaf tobacco 
market. Mc Rankin is the man- 
ager of the Gleneoe loose leaf 
warehouse, and Mr. Driscoll is the 
purchasing agent of the American 
Tobacco Company. 

Miss Jennie Lee Gaines has been 
very ill this week, having never 
fully recovered from an opera- 
tion for appendicitis. Dr, G, (.'. 
Rankins who is attending her ' 
called Dr. Haynes of Cincinnati in 



full values. The day was dark and 
the rain as it fell on the sky- 
lights formed an. icy covering, 
making the light very bad for 
the sale. The disappointment in 
the prices on the better tobaccos 
caused a rejection of 27,000 
pounds. The next sale will be 
held Saturday, Feb. 22 The gen- 
eral opinion of the tobacco trade 
is that prices will be much bet- 
ter in a month or so, as the con- 
ditions will be improved by that 
time. 



♦ S 

♦ RABBIT HASH. ♦ 

♦ S 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 

Hogan Presscr isT quite ill. 

R. L Piatt, of Rising Sun, was 
here, Monday, calling on old 
friends 



«-«u™ ui. xiuyuea oi win B. W. Clore and family Bpent sev 

consultation Monday and a train- er£ " days last week with relatives 
ed nurse has been employed to ne * r Waterloo. 

give her special attention. I Tho Jbreak up in the -xiver is ox- 

Died.-Mra T J. Cornelius, aged ' E^L" 1 V 16 ^t few days, and 
74 years, died at her honW ati wl £ *£ welcomed by all 
Atwood. Kenton county, Sunday. 1 wuj TT, a ? d „ T * J - JumD 

Jan. 29th, at two o'clock, from ■££&,*, *%* L a8t £ atu "L a y , and so rash as" to make" anV such de 
old age. She is survived by her ^fT the P* ^ Wlth *™* I claration. This G 

husband, Thomas J. Cornelius, 
and several children. The funeral 



While last Friday and Saturday 
were days on which the weather 
man kept us all ordinary folks 
doubting what to do, ten never 
to be out done students of our 
schools, five young masters ami 
tho same number of youn? Misses 
stormed their way through drifts, 
ice and sleet (o Hurlinjton and 
returned through rain to test 
their fate for Common School I)i. 
plomas. Following is the list of 
these resolute and determine! 
pupils, which may he given to 
show what may b> don • by "jrh 
AB well as an incentive to* others 
io follow: 

Miss Iva Pressor, Hathaway. 

Miss Mabel Rouse. Grange Hall. 

Miss Kathryn Utz, Grange Hall. 

Miss Aleen Riggs, Lima burg. 

Gladys Regenbogen, Hebron. 

John Birkle, Burlington. 

Elmer Gifford, Bullittsville. 

Hally Aylor, Union. 

Arnold Connelly. Union. 

Edwin Crigler, Hebron. 

As it was said of Ben Adhun, 
"may his tribe increase," so may 
it bo said of these brave and 
courageous lads and lasses. 

We^hardly expected any person 
to be present on account of the 
severe weather and impassable 
barriers on the highways, but the 
spirit of these never daunted. 
While some of these youngsters 
were ordered to hault* by snow 
banks and drifts, they retreated 
not to surrender, but to make 
an attack on another salient and 
reach the objective point, altho 
it was noon when the last one 
arrived. 

It is hoped that their efforts 
may be crowned with success and 
they may gain the prize which 
their trials so richly deserve. 
J. C GORDON, 
Superintendent. 

Would Like to Be in Old Boone. 

Alexandria, Ind., Jan 28, 1!>18 
Dear Recorder: — 

Being uncertain as to the out- 
come of four thousand patriotic 
warm blooded Kentuckian here in 
tho gas belt of Indiana, besides 
myself, from this awful winter it 
is perhaps in order to wave back 
an answer of good cheer to the 
folkB at home in Old Kentucky. 

We are in the midst of a winter 
that no Hoosier can remembor one 
like. The cities and towns are,com 
pletely covered with snow l'rom 
two to ten feet deep. The coun- 
try is covered over, too, ana 
thousands of acres of com remain 
tmgathered. We regret to know 
that Kentucky has it harder, if 
possible, than we. I "intended to 
be in Boone last Monday, but, gee 
whiz, a man might as wiell try 
to climb the Alps into Italy. 

When at Ft. Benjamin Harrison 
I saw a lot of the "red bloodea 
boys" from Old Kentucky, and they 
looked mighty good to me. 

Say, Mr. Editor, you are a good 
scout and know lots of things, 
but you don't know by 79 per ' 



Seeds that Grow 

is what you want when you buy ; seeds that have 
high purity and germination tests. 

You can get weed seeds for nothing. We know 
Seeds, and we have the best connections in the seed 
producing sections of the country, which enables 
us to go direct to the section where grown, and get 
the purest and best to be had. 

Every bag of Seed we send out is tagged as to 
purity and germination according to the Kentucky 
PURE FOOD LAW, and you will always find our 
Seeds above the standard. Write prices and sam- 
ples and be convinced. We are now the largest 
in Northern Kentucky. 

United State* Food A dministration License No. Gl77oT 

f CCdfrand]unKi& 



GROCERIES. FL OUR SEEDS. MEDIC/NES. 
19-2/ PIKE ST. /8-20W. 7™ ST 



Covington, Kentucky. 



Phones South 335 and 336. 




p.m., 
door, in the town of Burlington, 
fJoonetJounty, Ky., expose to public 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
described property, or so much there- 
of as may be necessary to pay State, 
County and School taxes duo there- 
on and unpaid for the year 1917, and 
the interest, penalty and cost there- 
on.- For a complete description of 
property see Assessor's book for as- 
sessment of 1916, at County Clerk's 
Office. W. D. CROPPER, 

Ex-Slierlff Boone County. 

Belleview Precinct, 
cent how well I would enjoy beWJNo. 876 Kelly, Elbert heirs 



Sheriff's Sale for Taxes. 

NoticeiHherebTgTventhatlormylf A RANK 11F QFRVIP.F 
deputy will, on Monday, F W im^,f -- irnlel\ Ul OLIlflOLl 

4th. 1918, it being county court day, 
between the hours of 10 a. m. and 2 
o'clock p. in., at the Court House 



ing in Boone countv a month at 
least. 

Here is hoping the Goddess of 
Liberty may dip het- pen in the 
sunlight of World-wide Democ- 
racy, and w:-ite prosperity with 
all the trimmings into every 
home and life of every man',|wo- 
man and child in Boone countv— 
RECORDER included. 

PHILIP. 



$ H.10 



8.06 



Better Obey Orders. 



A grapevine has reached 

Recorder that the proprietors of 

some of tha business houses in 

the county bay they intend to 

disregard the fuel order which is 

to remain in force until and in- wuu iowmuui| 

eluding March 25th, 1918. The Re- No. 2872 Burns, Hubert 
corder hopes there are no busi- 
ness men in this county who are 



;$4 acres land . . 
No. mi Rico Heirs 

Lot in Belleview .... 
Constance Precinct. 
Sa 1499 Clark, John B., nr 

• 2 lots in Constance 6.88 

No. 1711 Souther, E. A. 

o.1 acres land 40.10 

Florence Procinct. 
Nrf. 1902 Conner, F. R. 

1 lot in Florence 8.04 

No. 2001 Dulaney, B. A. 

2 lots In Florence. 20.30 j n) 

k No. 2151 Rhodes, Albert, lOa/if 

land near Kenton line . 22.50 

Petersburg Precinct. 
No. 2071 Bums, W. S. 

lot In Petersburg: rr. .t: 8 TKj 



Reduced rations for the Ameri- 
can people went into effect last 



took place Tuesday in charge of 
Edwards & Edwards, at Independ- 
ence. I Monday, under the regulations 

M. It, Kirkpatrick, president of prescribed by President Wilson 
the Farmers and Shippers tobac- a , * ne p< x>d Administration, some 
co Warehouse Company, Cincinna- °* ' t ' le chief features of which 
ti, spent Saturday here on the *7 e: A baker's bread of mixed 
loose leaf tobacco market. He is ' "°urs ; sales by retailers of an 
of the opinion that the market ! equal amount of substitute flour 
will get much better as the' for every pound of wheat flour 
shipping conditions get better so J d • ®ales by millers of whole- 
end the tobacco becomes in more Ba lers and by wholesalers to re- 
serviceable condition. I taderB of only 70 per cent< of 

The Junior Class in Music of the } he amount of wheat flour solcf 
Walton High School will give a last year; two wheatless days a 
patritoic musicale Friday night, week and one wheatless meal a 
Feb. 8th, at the school auditor- da Y5 one meatless day a week 
ium for the benefit of the Red and o^ 6 meatless meal a day, and 
Crosa, e small admission fee be- two porkless days a week. 

in« charged for this purpose. Thej i . 

older pupils will assist in the . The local trucks began ventur- 
.program which will consist of in g out yesterday, in their freight 
some very attractive music of a business, W. L Kirkpatrick's over 
patriotic nature, and all will be "» Orange Hall neighborhood and 
under the direction of the teach- £. E Kelly's to Belleview for i 
er, Mrs. Mollie \Mot tier- Wallace ' load of livestock. 

The remains of Mrs. Everett I n» 

Bedinger, who died at her home! M. F, r Goodridge, of Crest wood 
at Anchorage last Wednesday, Oldham county, renewiw Ids' sub 
were brought to her old home at scription, des^ribls the weather 
Richwood for burial. Mrs, Bedin- . there for several weeks ?as T off ' of 
ger had been in poor health for tho same piece as Sat furnisher 
**»* *>"», and was in her 45th to this part of Th* eountS ■ 
year at the time of her demise. _ coun try. 

She w-as the mother of Mrs. S p or Silo— Twn ™~i ™ i u 
D. S Ranson who was recently J£ OT £ wJ„v w g00d J ork hor " 
married, and Mrs. Ranson and her mT^I k? a °£ hor9e five > rears 
husband' went to AnchSag^ , £fi gJST McMuUerf "ft*.^™ ° l Z 
accompanied the remains here. i D 2 McMullen, Burlington R. 

fVL' *.. D - 8ut ton of Hopkinsville, ' — 

t-hnstian county, who was elected Geo S p nw > k™..u„ ~ . „ 
the Agricultural Agent for Boons WT bm5 if' ^ r « ther , °f Mrs 
county, Dec. 12th soent the tint hT' n °- ldd ?ll, died at hW home 

larmers and arranging for the) 

ggb atrrs l£r~ M w " h ' 

BobDe county needs n pood fiirm *„. ^ '. "" 

* cod Mr. Sutton should I be Ph< * hr * ak U P of «>• i«^ the 
•vsry opportunity to dem- Ti ^ l \ "* Cincinnati was starteo 
to his usefulness y for th,. about »• »• m, yesterday 

Mtof of | the •grirnttu-al lD .| — — 

_, and his tsrvtoss wUl not 1 } V' V Kd «a» C. Riley, of Ivt- 
oo# 4M» farmer anything . but , / r,l * w % w » * business visitor 
**■•••»* -Ctwful attsetlos to the lo huxlingtoo, Tuosday. 

"yy—yoyy «*d« mg««ttn« ti»*.i — — ~ — 

I7\m? croft ^^ th * ^? dur, , lo » , **!* 0»*k*>4 aoliwts, of Walton 



government has the 
authority to make such oi-ders in 
regard to the conservation of 
food, fuel, etc., as it deems justi- 
fied by fhe country's conditions 
because of the war in which it is 
engaged, and when it issues an 
order it never fails to provide 
for its enforcement, making it 
the especial duty of someone to 
see that it is complied with. The 
orders issued by the Government 
to the civilians is just as imper- 
ative as those issued for the gov- 
ernment of the soldiers in the 
cantonments and a failure to 
obey them is just as sure to le- 
sult in punishment. It may incon 
venience you somewhat but you 
Will profit by being an obedient 
citizen; 



08 



■ iWHibountmu ji *t~*rtaf"wWh MiM Wary Thorn p 
•on during her Utnaw. 



He Couldn't Get Back. 

Ed. Rice was the only citizen; 
of Burlington who had an aggra- 
vating experience with sleet last 
Saturday morning. He went out 
early and wsb unable to get back 
into the house, and his wife had 
to hand his breakfast out to him, 
and after getting on the outside 
of the "hand out" he, by the hard- 
est kind of labor, made it to \V*. 
L. Kirkpatrick's store, where he 
purchased himself a pair of new 
overshoes so he could move about 
in any kind of weather in safe- 
ty. 

Mrs. W, L. Riddell has been at 
the bedside of her brother, Geo. 
S. Pace, in Cincinnati, since last 
Saturday. Mr, Pace is dangerous- 
ly ill, and not expected to live 
many days. 

If the devil would take bad 
weather in lieu of his dues there 
would be no excuse for anyone 
being in arrears with him. 

The chirp f the English Spar- 
rows is heard again, altho many 
thought the 20 below zero wrat ti- 
er had wiped them out. 

* ■ ■"■•■•^■•■e^B**^ ■■ 

The weather this winter has 
been absolutely unfit for any kina 
of buslaeM not excepting that 
of the c oal man. 

Attorney <1. W. Tolin went l. 
Frank fort Monday 4o look ufi.»r 
•otne busin**! is the Court of 
Appeal*. 



lot in Petersburg. . . 
No. 2762 Hoffman, Charles 

lot in Petersburg 10.90 

No. 2790 Klopp, Frank, nr. 

60 acres land 14,60 

No. 2925 Tilley, Ralph C. 

lot in Petersburg 4.95 

Verona Precinct. 
No. :J427 McKenzie, W. E. 

■<0a land on Verona and 

Grant county road 1 1 .35 

No. H429 Napier, Charley, nr 

2 acres land 9.25 

Walton Precinct. 
No. 4219 Wilson, Roland 

lot— 1916 taxes, S5.10 
1917 taxes, 5.20 
No. 4049 Youell, Mrs. P. 0. 

lot in Waltou, 

No. 4238 Brown, Steve (col). 

1916 taxes, $5.75 
" 4052 1917 taxes, 6.00, lol2 yrs 11.75 
No. 4077 Senour, Jennie, (col) 
lot, in Walton 3.21 

WANTED— Man to tend tobacco 
in river bottom land. Some 
corn land furnished, house and 
garden free, and cow pasture. 
Address M. B, Rice, Landing, 
Ky . tf; 

FOR SALE, 

Rhode Island Red Cockerels, $1.50 
a piece. Phone Boaver 208. 
omclil Mrs. L. M. ROUSK. 




A man said to us, "I did not know a Bank could be 
of so much benefi t to~me until I opened an account 
with you and becarne acquainted with your service j 
you keep a confidential record of all my transactions, 
pay the taxes and 3 per cent, interest on my deposits, 
sell me Liberty Bonds and Thrift Stamps, lend me 
money when I need it, take a daily paper for my 
benefit, and assist me in dozens of other ways with 
my private business which I did not know a bank 
could do. I will carry a bank account." 

We appreciate the compliment of this friend and our 
service is free to all. The more we serve the better 
we can do it. 

We take an interest in your desire to succeed. 
Call or write us. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 

B Bank with Over One-Third of a Million Dollar* Asset*. 

W. L. B. ROUSE, Pres. A. B. RENAKER, Cashier. 



1W^ 



=®=§SfcS£-g| -Q~|j 



T-&m=&tt£3=&^£^&*&&^*^^2^^^^!^^i£*.<i : 2i S: . 



10.38 
13.20 



The Tri-State Patron Says:- 

"No Thank*, Mr. Station Man, after cutting the feed-cleaning the stable- ' ' 
I milking the cows and running the separator, 1 will also by my own rail- I I 
road ticket instead of paying you 4 FAT commission. If there is anything 
|| easy about keepiug cows, I want it myself." 

( ) Every farmer should ship his cream DIRECT to the Creamery. 



4. 



I' 

II 

• 
I) 
II 
I! 
I) 
i) 
!) 
II 



55 Cents 

per pound for Butter Fat week beginning Jan. 28, 1918 

The Tri-State Butter Co. 

y CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION 
License No. G-18152 



• r 

|| 25,000 of the largest producers have found the Tri-State always dependable | \ 

(| | and moat profitable. Do not let the Station Buyer talk you out of your cream ( ) 

|| and make for himself a profit of about 2c per pound or more. Ship US your 1 1 

| next can or if you need cans, we will send them prepaid for 30 days trial. . \ 



,k 



For Sale-6 Good Farms 

Beekeuholdt farm, 103 acres $9,000 

Pelsor farm, 06 acres 8,000 

i;Jo acre farm «, 100 

The above farms have best of 
improvements, large bams and 
Jmiises with modem improve- 
ments. 
(SO acres good tobacco land near 

"Yorkvflle 2.000 

90 aero farm, well located 0,300 

50 acre farm ;j,200 

Also flrst-cla^s Qreendsle property 
Address 

WARREN TEBBH, 
jiinlii i Iiawrenceburg, Ind. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦* 

• ♦ 

• WANTED FARM HAND ♦ 

• Married man to work by ♦ 

• the month. Steady work and ♦ 

• good wage*. Inquire at Par- ♦ 
<> lor OruvM Farm. ♦ 

• UtTON HKMPFL1NG, • 

• Taylor-poet, Ky ♦ 




Subscribe for the Recorder. 
Only $1.50 the Year 

Read Our Advertisements and Profit 6v Them. 



FOR SALE. 

Five room house and barn and five 
other outbuildings in Walton, Ky., 
on Verona road. 

JAMEB CR08H, 
omchl Walton, Ky. 

FOR 8ALE. 

An aged hnrae will weigh about. 
1400 pounds. In tine condition, uarf- 
eotly Jaafe for woman and children 
to drive, good worker. 

Mrs Mon«tte Rev 111. 

Burlington, Ky. 



"Burlington" 

Having received many req nests from 

Parties wauting me to sell their prop- 
have special arrangements to Uke 
care of that teritory; send me your 
diaoription of land and number of 
acres, prices, number of houses and 
hams, etc No salas DO pay ; aj per 
cent If sold. 

G. & POWERS, SiUmm* 

Equitable Bk. lildg. Walton, Ki 

Taaw Vonr ('Soutity Pap**-, 



* 



iiiW^tec; 



mm 



1 



■ " 'HI- 



■ 



"BOONF COUNTY 



RECORDER 



P5r? 



♦ 



H Sleeks f^ews 



The* crossing at Limaburg bsgaa 
giving vehicles so mo trouble list 
Saturday, 



This has been an awfdlly se- 
vere winter on th.> poor people 
in the cities. 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 31. 1918. 



An old tirujo \frood puV; would 
l«» a joy this winter to H 
nothing alxnit its beauty, and :i 
fivt- hundred pound green beech 
back log would be a luxury to 
most any one Just now. 



VILLA GROWING IT FAVOR. 

Will Still Be a Big Factor in Des- 
tinies of Mexico. 

Washington Post. 
'Villa d";id? He is one of the 



More About Air Control. 

Mr. R ft, Hearne. the chief ex-t 
pert connected with the British 
air 'bits ici', announces tha ; , whilo 
unable to express an opinion a» ; 



Fuel shortage reduced the Car- 
rolllon News t> a half sheet the 
last two weeks. 



They do say. that R. S Cowen 
ia planning right now to go to 
Florida next winter. 

This is the last day of .fauna ry 
and a great many people* can be 
found who do not cure if it is. 

Tho country people have been 
very much of an exclusive set this 
month, owing to the condition of 
the roads. 

Understand C. E White gave El- 
bert Clore and his mother $40 per 
acre for the land he imuglit of 
them last week. 



Tomorrow the shortest month, most lively dead men in Mexico, ■^* ha ; h, ' r ( T^? Y w uitTV £™ 

tho year will begin, and for , and still will be a big factor in' \'^\ * ^eat attack with in fan- 

•veral years it has been consid- the destinies of that country, in tr > ;i . nd . Mt **K r J5 1 Western Eur- 

l j. I j. ji i« . . . _. - _ _ ■-» o i'k nnritur IOIU Th£i*o i a Tin rum nr 



in 

sev 

ered the most disagreeable of the 

twelve. It will have to weather 

some if it maintains its record. 



Rats have been driven in from 
the fields by the cold weather 
and are doing considerable dam- 
age in some barn*, especially 
whore sacked feed had beon stor- 
ed. 



my opinion," remarked James J. °P» ^Vh 8 ' ^SAtrZ £**? ' 
Ross, of Dallas, a member of the, 1 * 1411 * ha ' ■»* io ° ,B "H» kra * ; ?'^"" 
Texas Rangers at the Raleigh . tic effort9 to ™ aua ^ m , a " . su : 
"Villa has Wn one of the leading P"-macy on the Western front 
spirits in the recent disturbances | du * m *„ the preheat year. 
in Mexico, and he will continue to I Mr " Hearne points out, in that 
be a figure. According to inf »rma connection, that Germany's pre- 
tion -I have, Villa £ now in parat.ons to retain the mastery of 
Ojinaga, and he commands large th * air do not necessarily »K«Mte 



Some of the sportsmen 
(1 nails are extinct in this part ol ! 



the country. There were many 
flocks at the beginning ?f the 
winter and they have been wiped 
out by tho severe weather. 



influence. If he desired he could 
j take the state of Chihuahua af 
think an y tim, N I believe. 

"Thore is a mistaken belief hero 



Sunday morning telephone wires 
appeared to be about an inch in 
diameter, and glass had been sub- 
stituted for metal. 



Miss Helen Chawning, of Cov- 
ington, was tho guest of her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Ella Kelly, last week She 
returned homo last Monday. 

Joseph Sachwill, of Cincinnati, 
was the guest of his son, Will- 
iam, of Locust Grove neighbor- 
hood, last Saturday and Sunday. 



Ira Aylor, of Union precinct, and 
E. E Utz and son, of Grange 
Hall neighborhood, were business 
visitors to Burlington, last Satur- 
day. 



If the eight Garfield Mondays 
to come bring the same kind of 
weather as, the two that are 
past, business houses in the 
country districts will Buffer Very 
little financially from having to 
close half the day. 



Are you getting your harrows, 
plows and other farming imple- 
ments you will need in 1 lie spring 
ready for use when the time 
comes ? 



Last week's issue of the Carroll- 
ton Democrat devoted its entire 
front page to *ihe publication of 
the Annual Financial Exhibit at 
that aity. 



A colored girl about ten years 
old, and a daughter of Leslie 
Kennedy, died last Saturday af- 
ter an illness of several days. She 
had measles. 



Judge Gaines will go to Will- 
iamstown next Monday to hold 
a three weeks term of the Grant 
county circuit court, it being his 
first 1918 term. 



Measles has made its appearance 
in about every neighborhood in 
this county, and many cases are 
in malignant form. There is also 
an occasional case of mumps. 

Michael O'Hara, of the Erlanger 
neighborhood, was in Burlington 
a few days ago. Mr, O'Hara has 
two sons subject to draft, and he 
was looking after their interests. 

Gulley & Petitt have begun mov 
ing into th* property they rent- 
ed of Edgar Riley in" Burlington. 
It is understood they will put in 
a stock of goods in one of tho 
rooms. 



in tho East and other parts of 
the United States that Villa is 
unfriendly to tho United States. 1 
have talked with Villa on more 
than one occasion, and he has 
always expressed high regard for 
Americans. Moreover, there is a 
mistaken idea that Villa can no' 
speak English. I conversed with 
him in English, and he spoke as 
well as many Americans I know. 
Of course he camouflages a bit 
now and then. 

mi u TIZ T^" i t .. "Villa has been guilty of overt 

The health of the people of the acts against the United States on 

town of Burlington has been re- occasions. I happened to be a 

markablv good so far this winter, , member of the ^arty that ar- 

rhere have been a few colds, reste d Villa a good many years 

ago when he had smuggled a lot 
of fine horses and other things 
into the United States and wai 
making for San Antonio to dis- 
pose of them. It fell to me to 
arre9t Villa and when he was 
confronted he accepted arrest as 
gallantly as any outlaw. He ad- 
mitted he was violating the law 
and submitted agreeing to do 
whatever was required of him. 

'Villa is still a factor in Mex- 
ico believe me. Furthermore, the 
sentiment among Americans along 
the border regarding Villa has, 
undergone a decided change. He 
is in much more favor than he | 
was, and many believe that 



but not very bad. Miss Mary 
Thompson, the town's oldest cit- 
izen, has been the sickest white 
person. 



The Government is making an 
effort to discourage tho exchange 
of merchandise for Liberty Bonds. 
It is claimed that such an ex- 
change defeats the leading and 
primary object of the bonds by 
discouraging thrift and encourag- 
ing expenditure. 



Time nor tide waits for no man 
—neither does the Burlington and 
Covington mall auto. Its wheels 
have to J be kept rolling that it 
may make its trips somewhere in 
tho neighborhood of- schedule time, 
while the weather and bad roads 
combination prevails. 



a great offensive on the ground. ! 
Mastery of the air is about as; 
important for thr* army that stands; 
on th?» defensive as forthe army i 
that attacks. In any event, it is ; 
of as much importance for the al- 
lies to defeat German aspira-, 
tion for air con'rol as it is for 
that nation to succeed in what it 
is attempting. 

Mr. Hearne gives no figures to 
show what Great Britain and! 
France are doing to provide air- 
planes and aviators for the com- 
ing struggle in the ^spring, but 
he speaks with strong commenda- 
tion of . the great preparations 
that are being made in America. 
If America is able to carry out 
her program, Mr. Hearne says, she 
will be able to wrest not only 
tho control of the air along the 
battlefront from Germany, but to 
shatter "the great bundle of nerves 
known as the German railway sys 
tern." Continuing he says: 

It is in this matter of smash- 
ing Germany's nerves that Amer- 
ica will bring invaluable aid to 
the allies by her thousands of air 
planes this year. American experts 
showed great: intelligence when 
they pronounced in favor of a 
gigantic air program, and if the 
United States delivers the goods, 
as I feel sure will be done, we 
shall havet he most important in- 
strument of victory against Ger- 
many. 



The B, B, Hume Automobile Co., Agents 

23-25-27 E. Fifth St., Covington, Ky. 
Agents for the following Automobiles and Truck: 
CHEVROLET, one man top, tire rack, demountable rim, 
a swell car. No hill it will not climb, have told 102 and 
have contracted for 125 more. There is not a dissatisfied 
customer. 

Chevrolet Baby Grand $ 962. f. o. b. Factory. 

Chevrolet Model 490 $ 671 f. o. b. Factory. 

HUPMOBILE 1918 MODLE, 

Price $1425, F. 0. B. Factory. 
PREMIER, with electric starter, $2250 f. o. b. Detroit 



The air program of the United 

will ultimately become IhTdom St3 ^ B - 9 ' in J? eed * ,a '. more c ,? m ' 

inanf fitrn^ & a V n , aom - prehensive than anything Ger- 

figure m that country." many can hope to * furn f sh . 



War Savings Committee. 



Th a first intermission 



Mr. G 



ton. 



ing- 



N. E, Riddeli, County Attorney, 
Burlington. 
J. G Tomlin, Attorney. Walton 



Considerable tobacco has been 
received the past week by the 



g's hibenatin. period will be Count? ^S^v^?^^ 
t S!Su^r d A ht> * t ; cte "*-- B i has appointed the * f ottowhS "as 
cmrtrmiatirnT~foV six weeks more members of the Advisory Commit! 
ot tho strenuous weather this part j tee- y ■oramit- 

of the country has been put thru : J. ( ; Gordon, Count v School 
a general packing of luggage for j Superintendent, Hurlingtor 
shipmen t South will b e in order. ^ A. B Renaker, Cashier, Bui 

County Superintendent Gordon 
had with him last Friday and 
Saturday an interesting class ol 
ten common school pupils who 
were taking the examination nec- 
essary to a graduation in the 
studies they had been so diligent- 
ly pursuing for several months, 
past. 

Misses Gwendolyn Goodridgeann 
Alberta Kelly went to Richmond, 
Saturday, where they entered the 
Eastern Kentucky Normal School, 
their purpose being to equip 
themselves for teachers. They 
are bright young ladies and will I 
complete the course in the pre- ' 
scribed time. * 



REPUBLIC TRUCKS 

Alodle 9, 3-4 Ton, $ 920. Alodle 10, 1 Ton, 9U95 Modle, 11 $I65( 
5-ton Trnck $4200 j 2 Ton Truck, $1985, 31 Ton Truck, $2950 

f. o. b. 
FREE SERVICE— Hupmobile 30 hours ; Chevrolet, a J hours: Truck 
4<) hours. 

All kinds of Auto Repairs done by the most competent man in Covington. 
A full and complete stock of Auto Accessories. 

B. B. HUME, Agent for Boone County, Burlington, Ky. 

9f 



w^^m^^^mf^m^m^yBm^^m^^ 





for 
the very simple reason that Ger- 
many has not, and cannot, get the 
money. This country, shortly after 
declaring war against Germany, 
appropriated about $750,000,000 for' 
-tne-air -service alone. This" IB suP 
ficient, in the end, to give the 
allies an overwhelming prepond- 
erance in the air. But we do not 
know how far advanced is our 
air program, although it will be 
noted that Mr. Hearne speaks of 
much of it as being probably 
available "£his year." 



Precinct Committeemen : 
J. A. Caywood, Principal High 
S. B Nunnelly, M D.. Burling- 
ton. 



Pay Your Income Tax. 



Rev. C. E Baker, Grant. 

School, Burlington. 

John Delehunty, Beaver Lick 

J. Colon Kelly, Grant 

Ollie Kottmyer, Ludlow R. D 2 

J. G. Renaker, Cashier Florence 
Deposit Bank. 

R. L, Green, Union R D. 1, 

Hubert Walton, Petersburg. 

M. J Crouch, President Union 
Deposit Bank, Union. 

O. K Whitson. Cashier Verona 



In the street between M. L Rid- • Bank. Verona 
dell's store and the Boone Coun- Rov 
ty Deposit Bank there was for 
Several days a snow drift that 
the trucks and tout-in* cars had 
to buck in passing that way, ana 

in every instance thev hung up; Now York, J anuary ' 21. — CI S_ 

and had to bo pushed out. The j Thompson, Chairman of the Pivss 



DeMoisey. W.ilron. 

1 14 Hun Spies Executed by U. S 



local firm of dealers. The ooadi- rear wheels on th" machines would : Committee of the American De 

tion m which it was delivered make the snow flv but could *ei I fen so Society, in an informal dis 

has- caused no objection on the nowhere, 
part of tho purchasers. 



-Eggs wove selling for one dol- 
lar a dozen in Lexington, last 
week, and were hard to get at 
that. The hen is coming to the 
front as the most valuable as- 
set a farmer can have. 

Tho loose Leaf tobacco sale at 
Walton, last Saturday, was not as" 
igood as those who had tobacco 
on the floor expected. Walton! 
has gone up against a very bad 
day on the occasion of every sale 
this season. 



cussion at a luncheon given 
the organization here Foday 



"Thf» Commissioner of Internal 
Revenue has instructed all Col- 
lectors to urge taxpayers to pay 
their income taxes when they file 
their returns, which must be fil- 
ed on or before March I, 1918, 
said Collector of Internla Revnue, 
Charlton B. Thompson. They have 
a right under the law to post- 
pone payment until June 15, 1918, 
but they are requested, on paa- 
triotic grounds^ to < pay wh|en 
filing their returns. This will be 
of real help to the Government 
both because of the earlier re- 
ceipt of the revenue, and in ret, 
lieving this department of the 
great amount of detail work ana 
congestion resulting from the 
necessity of sending out assess- 
ment notices and of receiving all 
the payments at one time. 

A discount at the rate of 3 per 
cent per annum is allowed for 
advance payments, but where the 



| Atlas Auto Top Company 

*% Now at 15 East Seventh St., COVINGTON, KY. 

2 Top«, Seat Covers, Curtains, Ford Seats $4.75 up. 

^ Write. Phone or Call. Phone S. 3837. 5 



No Advance. 

^g_haye^pur rhnsp d a ri o alor - 3 en t ire stuck of Hardware, 
Leather, Etc., which enables us to take care of your 
wants in repairing of harness at old prices. We also 
have a 60 per cent Neatsfoot Jet Black f 4 nri 

Harness Oil, at per gallon 1 I 1 UU 

New and Second Harness at All Prices. 
It will pay you to visit us and get our prices. 

Thomann Harness Store 

S 3018 X12 Pike St., Covington, Ky. 



de- 



tax amounts to buy 



A radv who is classed as nn &ed that the society had ' been i }?"• f^jlf^ 01 "}* 48 
"old maid," was told one day last | [n°'™^ that the United States . g*^ Ta XD aver W 
week that the Kentuckv Legisla- ' iad . executed 14 spies since the !£ *?-,„ !, a ^ffi°L „ 



■r 



ew dol- 

smaii 

ess be wavied 

hen the dis- 



le Kentuckv Le<Hsl-i- ! aau executea 14 spies since the :' ,„: . « ^£ i 

Sderi??? l£t Ttax N^2« of the war with ^SS£. te . tSSf^JlfiBPS i?2 



tint- was con .. 

tho old maids and old bachelors I m ^"y-.He added that en ■rrny aliens 



in the State annually six dollars 



m 



this country "shquld be ap- 



She at once answered that she I Pf 186 " °.' these facts* as evidenc 



Before the thaw began some 
had tha snow removed from their 
roofs as a mntter of protection. 
A great deal of water found its 
way down between the outer and 
inner walls of ii house to annoy 
tho occupants. 

Ed. Rice is alarmed for fear nil 
tho fish in the creeks have been 
smothered or frozen, but his 
friends are consoling him with the 
assurance that even under such 
conditions ho will catch as many 
fish jiext summer as usual. 

Mayor James White, of Flicker- 
town, was in Burlington, last Fri- 
day. He says he has a good sup- 
ply of sausage, hominy, cabbage 
and numerous other articles of 
food and all he has been doing 
this year is eat, sleep, smoke his 
pie, keep warm adn grow fat, and 
his looks corroborated him fully in 
his last statement. 

Councilman Skelton, with four 
horses and a heavy snow drag on 
Thursday, ojjened a road way 
across the Ohio river from the foot 
of Fifth *trect, and our Indiana 
friends will be able to deliver 
their tobacco and also haul wood 
for fuel to Carrollton buyers while 
the ice remains as solid aHat prea- 
ent— Carrollton News 

Sears, Roebuck Si Co., or Chica- 
go, certainly have a lon^ lint of 
customers here, judging from thi> 
number of their catalogued st-nt 
to ibo local poMtoffice, |{ l> ■> 
Sjeetna to lm the firms richest 
field with No. 1 a closi! compe- 
titor for tU" honor it mixht i>e 
added tint tha rural are 

tn lov.. with Mesera S#ar». Roe- 
bwk * Co., and hall with d.- 
llfht their largr consignments of 
ttt«ul matter If you don I 
what yuu say. 



objected to a tax on old maids 
but thought it would b:> right 
to tax the old bachelors as they 
are responsible for there being 
any old maids. 



For several days previous to 
last Saturday very little had been 
doing in the shoeing departments 
of the rural blacksmith shops, but 
that day brought a change in 
weather conditions that speeded I 
up the work of shoeing much to ! 
tho pleasure of the disciples ofi 
vulcan. Tho heavy sleet that be- _. v 

gan falling Saturday cau"ht all I J"*" 9ea9on *• again at hana 
the farmers with "slick ° horses, ' when the carrier is froced io en- 



of America's determination to pro 
tect herself." 

"We are informed," Mr. Thomp- 
son said, ''that up to dat?- 14 spies 
have been shot by direction of 
the military authorities of the 
United ^States since the begin- 
ning of the war. At least two 
of the spies were from Detroit. 
We believe that this is the sort 
of information that the public 
should know." 

Rural Carrier's Season. 



and tho blacksmith had his in- 
ning again as the farmers crowd- 



dure all sorts of hardships in de- 
livering yourUnail. Especially when 



ed "his shop with horses that re- snow ' banks have to be bucked is 
quired shoeing. I his work doubly hard. The can i 



ments, a notation should be made 
on tha return, "Discount waived.'- 
Payment of the tax when the 
return is filed will save the tax- 
payer all danger of becoming de- 
lirquient, and is esipepiially desir- 
able in tho case of small taxpay 
ers. Checks or money orders will 
be accepted. 

Saving Gasoline. 

There are many wavs to avoid 
gasoline waste. One is not to al- 
low the engine to run idle, except 
when absolutely necessary. An- 
other is to run your car /on as 
lean a mixture as possible. The 
car may not accelerate as rapidlv. 
and may cough a little when cold, 
but if you will ba patient with it 



■ The pj 

h Woman's Favorite _ 

Women bear their full share of 
B the dairy work. Anything that HJ 

will make their tasks easier de- 
I serve3 a cordial welcome. A ■ 

woman can turn 

THE NEW ■ 

SHARPIES s 

SUCTION- PEED 

Separator slow- H 
ly and yet get 
a'J tho cream . Wt 
Any other 
~ separator ■ 
will loso cream 
when turned HJ 
peiow speed. 
Yo u have I 
only to tilt a 
pcil of milk BJ 
into the large, lew supply tank. 
The simple tubular bowl is Very BJ 
easy to clean — only three pnrta. no 
fussy discu to wash. Come in and let 
us show you Ubw it works. H 

QUIGLEY * BEEM0N, H 
Limaburg, Ky. _ 



RILEY & RILEY 

ATTORNEYS -AT LAW, 
and REAL ESTATE. 
Burlington, Ky. 
Edgar C Riley will be in Burling- 
ton every Monday and Friday. 




Farmers as a class are not cer- 
tain which they are nearest, the 
the deep 



er is paid to deliver your mail not | F^"** au « aui <- Tt T to dfke at 
to work the roads, and if you ex- ) h09! * speeds, Accelerate gradual- 
poet your mail promptly, each day *¥' a8 . th ^ requires less gasoline 
at the regular time, just see that ' thai > trying to (reach top speea 



DR. T. E. RANDALL 

of Petersbury, 
you will get much higher mileage. X/cr-rFr-|SJAC?IArvl 
Every car has an economical V fc. I CLIN AKIAN 
speed, usually between 12 and 18 is now ready to answer calls day 

or night. Charges reasonable. 

'tho apff^ch"t<rj^MlBHdrW^lsj^^ 1 / 1 : Anticipate ;your" stops, ij _^ Mtt 

'efore you reach | All kinds of farms in Kentucky, 

and coast to Ohio and Indiana. I have all the 

bargains. See me at the Erlanger 

Wra. E. BAIRD, 




stuffs, etc., but in the matter of I * uul " ,a,,u /« that they are re 
increased Wo^they £?%&£ \ "Z^&JSi S^SS.*!*^ h " ,B 



capped by a ix'rplexing 



not oi>ened his road see that he 



i,. la »oT doi ° 8 - Patrons of the route have 

a^SmpE 1 flJSSJTKf aixl STSS^ else V* do ^ 8ides - 8it 
ious and willing to increase their & tho stove «» ( 1 cuss the carrier 
crops, but how about Tabor. 1 , 1^™,. *** H mow eomea-they must 
has been scarce for several voiie. I " e< L that "»e ">s«hi are open,, ana 
while in lJ^t3^^SSSl^te«\*?SW «*ort any inat- 
forty of her robust young men 



have been .called to * the coIoih, 
whilr* twenty-five more are Uabl < 
to bo called at any time, ana 
still others are enrolled and mav 
be called before the cropping h>\i 
son is through. Th«ro is no ;i |»- 
l>arent way in w«ich this reduc- 
tion of farm lalwr can l>i» H up- 
pUsd, and a state of uncertainty 

provalia Mttong the farming cla*s, 
bid it wUl do its hit un«h»rthc 
circumstances. 



tention on the pa'rt of the carri 
cr. It is the duty of the patrons 
to see thai the road is open toeacli 
and every day if they expect to 
receive their mail pro'mntly. snvs 
1 lie Postal Department. 



been 



HALK8MAN WANTKI» 
Lubricating oil, grssse, apt 1 
paint. Pari ,., ^ h<<[,- | 
intiMk>ti haiiii until ubUu 
e»l*Wl»h«-d M'ih u s h 
b'rrcd. 

RiV4>r«idi Ktfinina 

Cleveland Qfc| 



Business Slack. 

Not much buslnssa ha 
li.iusacted at the court house so 
iar this yoar, The mouth oi ; Jan- 
uary 1h muslly when the I-i<IuihI 
dsala aix% put over but thoro 
ban Imh-ii no tiim> fit for aveii 
that kiml ol trnlhi- this wlnW, 
uud providing luel h-^ 
Hull o.^ all tli— imur a time, 



Im farnmr in n»in'< to l.«. | 
mlfhty lu»y man whan obi 

BHU jjclH through doljU t>uatni.«« 
In thla |Wlrt of thr. rr.„ n t ry4 



ling at top ef- Deposit Bank. 

> keeping theiseplS 
motor free from carbon, as a car- 
bonized motor consumes an excess 
ive amount of fuel. Use a good 
grade of oil in the motor and keep 
all moving parts well lubricated to 
reduce friction losses. Run the 
car on high as much as possible 
as this is the loeonomicaj speed. 
Keep the tires well inflated, as a 
soft tire waslest power. See that 
tla> breaks do not bind and cause 
friction when the car is running. 
Finally, us.' kerosine instead of 
gasoline for cleaning.— Milestone 

A Sure Cold Weather Sign. 

II. V Carlisle said he knew this 
would !»• a hard winter. He saya 
be nsver saw us many pupscani- 



Erlanger. Ky, 



GEO. B. POWERS 

Real estate Agent, 

Fipe and Life Insurance 

WALTON, KY. 

KvM.l tor my ltrt of property for salo. (;tv<- 

nn your property It you wuul to sell. 

Commission Ia>w. 



D. E. Castleman; 
A TTOEJV£ YATLA W t 

— Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentuck 



v. 




IF YOU WANT A 

CREAM SEPARATOR 

GIVE ME A CALH. 

I handle the United States, a 
first-class Separator. Old Sepa- 
tors taken in trade. 

Thos. Rice. 

Burlington, - Ky. 

sept 38-tf 



Farm for Sale. 



My farm of 85 acres on the LUua- 

burg and Mineola pike, a miles from 

Constance, Boone County, Ky. Tide 

farm is in excellent condition, being 

ed home by boytt as he saw this °o« of the;bost trunk farms in tho 



fall, and thi»* is a Airs indication 
of cold weather. \t he came r > 
town, Wnlnt 'it.1,11, ho met u boy 
mid a imp, which n a surs >in- 
<tu>ii of thr»H> wsska more of 
weather worts than ws have liaa. 
Binos t« Uing ua this slghn ws rs- 
mmmtiUt meeting a hov on Friday 
carrylntr thrtte pupa. For ifoodscs* 
Mik.-*, boym Irt up on ths pupa — 
CsrroUto,, imuo«-.*I. 



ii 



vicinity of Clnolunati «»n the west. 
No pour landfall in grass except II vn 
acres, 3 uorss of wootllaud, idenfy of 
water, uto<h1 pond, well and cistern, 
6-rooin frame bouau with (Kirohaa 
back and front, end other necessary 
buUdlngaall lutfS<Kt rapslr. Foaaea- 
slou given any UBDe- For price sad 
tsrtua sddrsas 

JOHN W. FUBLONO. 
auv. 8tf I.udlow, Ky. K. Xkt, 



m 



Women ! 

Here Is a message to 
suffering women, from 
Mrs. W. T. Price, of 
Public, Ky.: «i suf- 
fered with painful...", 
she writes, "I got down 
with a weakness In my 
hack and limbs... I 
felt helpless and dis- 
co tt raged. . .1 had about 
given up hopes of ever 
being well again, when 
a friend insisted I 

Take 

CARDUI 

The Woman's Tonic 



I began Cardul. ' Is 
a short whils I saw a 
marked difference . . . 
I grew stronger right 
slona and It cured me. 
I am stouter than I 
hare been in years." 
If you Buffer, you caa 
appreclats what It 
means to bs atrong and 
WSU. Thousands of wo- 
men giro Cardul ths 
credit for tbslr good 
hsslth. It should bait 
Try Cartful At att 



HI ■■■■■■■BSMHgMI ■'.,-,.. i V ,i'.';: 






\ 



rHURSDAY, JANUARY 31. 1^18 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



PACK SILAGE IN SILO 



Proper Distribution and Packing 
Are Often Neglected. , 



When Lighter Portions Are Blown to 

Outside They Do Not Settle Well 

—Plenty of Men and Persistent 

Work Required. 



i. 



Distributing and parking siingp in £ 
•the s«lio is frequently neglected. 53115 
less the blower has a distributor nt-jg 
'tachmcnt there is a ton<Ien<y for tho c 
(cur corn' to fall in one place in tho 
fcllo. If the silo. is filled In this way, 
■the flm*r and light rr portions of the 
ptalkp are frequently Mown id the out- 
iside. and (he heavier parts, ehrs nnfl 
butts of stalks, nr.' deposited In the 
renter, thus causing p.n uneven distri- 
bution of grain and stalk* p.nd a con- 
sequent uneven quality of »ilage. T'n- 
fven distribution Is frequently the 
jcanse of soft places and siir pockets, 
<whieh later result in spoiled silage. 
—When— the lights p"-*T'V'$' nrp ' 
'to the outside they do not pnek well 
and] the silage spoils near rlie wal , 
Sneh spoilage, which really results 
from c arri es * filling. In often attributed 
to the silo. Therouch packing requires 
plenty of men ami persisteni work*! 
Oood silace ean he !t 



\ HELPFUL TRACTOR HINTS 

. ■ raetor are . 

t*e»per than rephtra niasvtime *.- 

hi obtaining*! item und get- X 

ling started HgaliL 

Looking over all parts -of the 
machine regolariy is .iust as t'ru- 
l<ortant as regular feeding and 
watering of horses. 

The trrong kind of luliricat- 
intr oil wastes pnwer and fouls 
every working pact; net in- 
structions from the builders as 
to kind and quanti ty of oil. 

Sharp ultjv. s rail for less pow- 
er from the engine to do good 
work, henro less cost to operate & 
and longer life for the tractor. 
Lengthening of hitches between 
engine am) plow will often elim- 
inat" a large part of side draft, 
which Is another way of reduc- 
ing the cost of the work. 



!•» 



FARM 
ANIMALS 

CHARCOAL OF MUCH BENEFIT 



I 



ZWZ^Z&fJyWVPW^&WtW&V}- 



WINTER PLOWING OF VALUE 



rrrortarce of Opening Up Soil Not 

Generally Realized by Farmers 

and Gardeners. 



I 




The importance of opening up the 
soil of all land that was not put into 
fall crops in time for it to get the full 
ntyby uutfuriu J benefit of disintegrating frosts and 
enriching snows is not so generally 
realized by fnrmers and home gar- 
I doners as It should be. 

More particularly are these atmos- 
pheric effects of value on clay and 
other stiff soils, and in the vegetable 
garden and the orchard the turning 
over and loosening of the earth ex- 
poses the liibernntiug forms of many 
insects to the sharp eyes of birds, 
poultry ami the smaller rodents, while 
those that are not eaten perish from 
the disturbance. 

While it is altogether better that 

this working of the gruuud should be 

done iti the fall, before the ground 

| has frozeu, it can also often be done 

during «>p*m spells from midwinter 

until March, with the subsequent 

I freezes and snows to produce Urn good 

j offoetn de t iredi — of eoufnt. t his can - ' 



Digestive Apparatus of Hogs Kept In 

Good Running Order — Make 

Use of Corn Cobs. 

Charcoal is good for begs. It keeps 
their digestive apparatus in good run- 
ning order. Corn cobs make good 
charcoal when properly charred. On 
nearly every farm most jjf^ the cobs 
are allowed to collect in around the 
feed lots until they become a nui- 
sance. Why not gather up these cobs 
and make charcoal of them for the 
bogs? It can be done in the following 
manner: 

Dig a pit about 10 feet long, 8 feet 
wide rnd 3 or 4 -feet deep. A larger 
hole than this can be made, depend- 
ing •:.; -a the amount of cobs io be 
bnrned. With some paper and" cobs 
or kindling stnrt a fire in the center 
of the pit and as it gets a good_start j 
add more cobs. Continue adding cobs 
until the pit is filled, then lay some 
old sheet-iron across the top and 
cover with earth to hold in the fire 
and smoke. Leave alone for t,wo or 
three days, then open and If the pit 
was properly made and filled, the cobs 
will have turned to charcoal. This 
can be taken out. sprinkled with salt, 
lime and copperas and placed where 
the hogs can get at It. 



•ROAD* 
BUILDING f 

I 



Dibowski's Cafe 



TIME FOR DRAGGING ROADS 

Much Depends on Character of Road 

Material— No Exact Rule Will 

Fit All Cases. 



If clay is mixed with water and 
"puddled" and then allowed to dry n 
hard, almost waterproof, and nearly 
dustless material Is formed. If a 
smooth, well shaped road could be con- 
structed of this material it would 
never become very muddy or very 
dusty, arid wtndd be an ideal earth 
road. Under ordiuary conditions this 
Ideal is not realized, because, after, 
being puddled the earth d^ies in ruts 
and holes which are rough while dry 
and which hold water like dishes when 
It rains. If the muddy road, after 




iW 



-THAT- 



Neat Little Place 

For Farmer. Workmate, Merchant, Clerk 
and Professional Man. 

Commercial Luncheon from 11 a m. to 1:30 p. 
m. Supper 5 to 7 p. m. 

No. 6 Pike Street, ■ . Covington.Kentuc ky. 



CARING FOR FARROWING SOW 



Exercise Should Be Given and Corn 

Ration Decreased — Don't Feed 

Too Rich Ration. 

Exercise the sow daily before far- 
rowing. Decrease the corn ration and 
increase the tankage rather than the 
middlings. For £4 hours after far- 
rowing do not feed lb,, sow. or feed 
lightly. Water should be supplied. 




;better sight 

Makes the world brighter. Many peo- 
ple «ro through life with poor vision, 
with only a few dollars would make 
them see perfectly. Don't do it— it 
pays to take care of your eyes. 
Phone South 1746 
T\J> IVT TP "PTnVnVT , „ w, THMOT<'H,J,,w rI . r . 

-L^-LV. 1* . f , JT -EJ±\1N ,613 Madison Ave. - Covington. Ky 




Filling a Silo. 

packing and uniform distribution of 
'the corn. The entire surface, espe- 
cially the outer edge, should be packed 
firmly. The best help obtainable should 
:be stationed in the silo. 

The large eytfer with the correspond- 
ing large capacity frequently saves 
imoney in filling the silo, but it tuny re- 
sult in a waste of the storage capacity 
•of the sifo. If the starts filled rapidly 
rrbe corn has little time to settle. Slow 
filling allows the corn to settle as it is 
jBtored, with the result that more corn 
'«an be placed in a given space. To over- 
tome this disadvantage of rapid filling, 
woven wire may be extended above the 
top of the silo, thus Increasing its ca- 
pacity until it can settle. Patent roofs 
fire made which serve. the same pur- 
pose. B. efilling_ in 4w« or -rt we~day* 



not be done unless the v arm spells 
Tire of BUtnClflnl duration to have the 
ground thoroughly settled, else the 
job would be dimeult aud unsatisfac- 
tory. 



LEGUMES ARE MUCH FAVORED 

Come Nearer to Giving Something for 

Nothing Than Any Other Plants 

— Add Nitrogen. 



WlH accomplish the same end. 



Alfalfa, clover, beans, peas and the 
rest of this family produce the most 
nutritious food and at the same time 
add more nitrogen to the soil than 
they remove. 

Legumes come nearer to giving 
something for norhiag than' any other 
plants. Yet there is nothing mysteri- 
ous -about these plants. They have 



ATTENTION NEEDED BY COLT 



Grain Ration After Weaning Com. 

posed of Corn, Oats and Bran Is 

■ Good— Water Hegularly. 



A good gram ration for the colt nf 
ter weaning is composed of one-fourth I 
corn, one-four!!) bran and o h e- h aftl 
oats, or one-fourth corn, three-eighths 
bran and three-eighths oaf. Crushed 
oats are to be preferred to whole outs, 
A feed-bos in which to place the feed 
,cnn be put In the pasture field if other 
Stock will not interfere with the colt 
.while eating. ' 

• In late fall as the pasture grass 
•grows short, it should be supplement- 
,ed with clover or timothy hay. all the i 
colt will eat. The eol't or' pasture 
should have access to drinking water 
iregularly. If there is no drinking wa* 
(ter in the pasture field, turn the young 
animal in to the water trough Just as 
^regularly as the work horses are 
Iturncd to water. 




Care should be taken not to feed the 
sow too rich b ration. Mere milk 
may be available than the pigs can 
take, and milk fever nitty result. 

After farrowing, the pigs should be 
given plenty of exercise, to prevent 
thumps. Rails about the sides of the 
pen will keep the sow from lying on 
the pigs. If colony houseware used, 
a lighted lantern hung inside on very 
cold nights will help to keep the 
houses warm. 



BABY BEEF SIRE DESIRABLE 



Farmer Cannot Afford to Use Any 
Other Kind in Strictly Beef- 
Producing Undertaking. 

If you are engaged in beef produc- 
tion and raise your steers use a real 
"dyed In the wool" baby beef sire to 
make your business a profitable one. 
You cannot afford to use any other 
kind of sire in a strictly beef produc- 
ing undertaking. 

There are just four breeds of cattle 
conimon to America from which real 
bnhy beef sires can be selected. These 
are the Shorthorn, Hereford, Aberdeen 

j Angus and Gnllowny. The market 
wants meaty, blocky beeves, and sixes 
o! these-b r e ed s a re t h e inndrthnrT't^" 

\ duce this type because beef production " Ul, \ l ""V Ti"i 

1 has been bred into them for gemna- 1 D , rnKK,nK sll0U d bfi 

j tions pasL 

The way to get fl good baby beef sire 
is to buy one. Own your own bull if 

j you have ten or more cows. . It is the 



Dragging Road in Fall. 

being puddled by the horses" hoofs 
and wagon wheels, can be smoothed 
out and properly shaped before dry- 
ing then the ideal is attained, and 
this smoothing and shaping is the 
work accomplished by the road dragT 
The water standing in pools and pud- 
dles is spread out over a larger sur- 
feioe. so that it dries quickly, the min- 
ute holes, or pores in the clay are 
sincnrod over and closed, making th e 
surface more nearly waterproof; the 
ruts and holes arc gradually filled 
up and made smooth, aud Just enough 
earth is moved toward the middle to 
give the proper crown. The result Is 
a smooth, hard, well-shaped road 
which will shed water and never be- 
comes very muddy In we> weather 
or very dusty In dry weather. 

From the above discussion it can 
readily be seen flint dragging should 
be done when the road is wet, or at 
least when it Is moist. The exact 
time to drag any given road will de- 
pend upon the character of the road 
material, and no exact rule can be 
given which will fit all cases. If traf- 
fic can be kept off from the dragged 
portion for awhile then the road may 
be dragged when It Is very wet and 
sloppy, but if wagons are going to 
follow right behind the drag, making 
deep ruts as soon as the old ones 
are filled up. the dragging must be 
deferred until the road has partly 
dried out. Good judgment and experi- 
ence on the part of the operator will 
soon tell him what is the best time to 
drag any given road. Roads which 
dry out quickly must be dragged im- 
mediately after n rain, while others 
may be allowed to dry for sev-nil 
days before being drag ged. Dragging 
a dry road simply makes It dusty. 
done,' if possible, 
nd as soon there- 
after as conditions are right. 



C. SCOTT CHAMBERS 

Embalmer and Funeral Director 



!»***> 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 

Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 

Consolidated Phone 35. Farmers I'honc. 



* 1rfrCtirirtr<tirCrtrtrtrCrtrCrC^^ 

GOOD HORSES NEEDED 




It is true that motor power is 
taking the place of horses in 
many kinds of work, but the 
horse still has an Important 
part to play. This country has 
shipped more than 1. 000,000 » 
horses and 300.000 males to the ' 
allies since the beginning of the 
war and more are ^oing all the 
time. Horses have played an 
important role in this war. be- 
cause horses can be. used on 
roads and In many places where 
truck and motor power tire 
helpless. 

At the rate which horses are 
being exported we cannot help 
but feel u n-.ed for horse* in 
this country and especially If 
the war continues much longer. 

MORE EGGS FROM LESS HENS 

Select Beet Mi<m From Most Pro- 

lifts Layer*, and Mate These 

With Baa* Record Hsna. 

Bread for eggs. This can be done, 
Nhoufh mam people acf n* though thin 
ft ImpoMrihlc. Relucrloh ha» ulv*p us 
tba rata aorst, the big milker, the 
JKf Mk K110* it lay-era, get 

■MlwftfM* the bent layer* In the dock, 
«aie Mw«* to xxULfeRLiW 1 
•M t+t owra egaa ft*a> tact Mrd«. 

MM 



Turning Under Clover Crop. 



bacteria that live on their roots. These 
bacteria in return for being given a 
home (nodules) on tile plant roots and 
for food from the plant take nitrogen 
from the air and leave It In the soil 
for the plant's use. 

There are millions of dollars' worth 
Of this nitrogen over each acre; so the 
bacteria have an almost endless sup- 
ply to draw on. • 

The way to tap this great wealth is 
to grow these plants that have these 



wonderful bacteria on their roots. | 
These plants do not do well without ! 
the bacteria. When alfalfa, clover, ! 
peas, beans or i any of the other of 1 
these legume plants are sown oa a' 
piece of land for the first time it is 
Usually necessary to sow the bacteria j 
as well as the plant seed. 

In these days when plant food is ao 
important the greatest possible usf J 
should be made of the legumes, th* | 
greatest food producers for muu and 
beast. 




SURFACING THE FARM ROADS 



OATS IN FATTENING RATION 



Good Feed for Brood Sows and Grow- ' 

Ing Pigs, But Not So Useful In 

Finishing Hogs. 

Ground onts wilt ho found a good 1 
feed for brood sows and growing 
pigs but not so useful ha corn for ; 
fattening hogs. When made a part ; 
of the fattening ration onts should' 
not constitute more than one-third nf 
(t, and probably one-fourth would he 
better. The great hog fa'iener I* 
cum, and nothing else on earth equal* 
H for Kiilns or quality of product But 
com Is moHt effective In my .ing gain* 
when btiianred bv some 'ankafa ** 
oats or mlddliau'M, and her* the oati 
Ussy be UMcfai lu the ftttigolnf yra* 



Champion Shorthorn Steer. 

only way to be certain of results. Buy 
from a reliable breeder, and if possible 
from a -man you know. By all means 
be sure to buy from a man who main- 
tains a disease-freo herd. 

The better the sire you use the great- 
er is the improvement which he will 
produce in your herd. Use one that is 
better than any other animal in your 
herd and in buying a new sire always 
get one better if possible, than tin? 
last. 



MINERAL MATTER FOR SWINE 



Materials Ordinarily Used in Budding 

Roads Are Too Expensive — Few 

Good Suggestions. 

Many of the materials ordinarily 
employed In road construction will be 
found too expensive for use in improv- 
ing the farm roads. One or more of 
the following will, however, usually 
be found available and within the 
menns of the farmer for surfacing his 
roads and paths: gravel, mjxtures of 
sand and clay, cinders, brickbats from 
old buildings, brickyard waste and 
quarry waste. The material selected 
should, however, be hard enough to 
withstand crushing under heavy loads 
and possess sufficient binding power 
to compact well and maintain a firm, 
hard surface under all ordinary wcath- 
er conditions. 



PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

Undertaker & Embalmer 

Magnificent Horse Drawn 



or 



Luxurant Ambulance 
at 

Your Command 



Automobile Equipment 

Calls Answered Promptly in Auto at all Hours. 



I'llONK.S li!*)- 



KKUNOKR ST 



JNIUHT- 

ERLANGER, KY 



THE TROTTING STALLION 

ST. ALPHONSUS 2:24! 

By CHARLEY HERR, the iron horse 
of the grand circuit 

Will make a season at Er- 
langer Fair Grounds in 1918. 
$20.00 to insure a living foal. 
Get your mares booked early. 
O. M. ROGERS, Owner. J. F. RAFFERTY, Agent. 




J. L. HAMILTON 

Verona, - - Kentucky. 

All of the Up-to-I)ate methods and 
. reasonable charges. Fine line 
of Monument Work. 



IMPROVE ROADS AND DRIVES 



Where Any Considerable Amount of 

Hauling Is Necessary Surface 

Improvement Is Needed. 



tiiynSfc- 




Mixture of Charcoal, Slaked Lime and 
Small Quantity of Salt la De- 
sirable in Winter. 

During the winter, ulten the K>ouud 
la frozen, it is very detdrable to pro- 
vide mineral matter to hoj;s in tbs 
form of h mixture of charcoal, Kinked 
lluia and a small quantity of Halt. This 
mixture euu Imj plasad In u box whei « 
the pigs can cut uh much as they want 
Soft-coal dual run u-mtilly be hud at a 
much lower mm than rnsrcoal, and u 
Stems to aaswar th» parposs quit* as 
well. 



Roads and drives immediately 
around the farmyard und barns which 
are used very frequently are usually 
of sufficient importance to warrant 
some surface Improvement. Very light 
or extremely sandy soils cut up badly 
In dry weather, while certain heavy 
and absorbent soils become very sticky 
and soft during the rainy season. 
Where any considerable amount of 
hauling Is necessary, roads over soils 
or this character may require to be 
scrfuced. 



Telephone— Calls answered prompt- 
ly, day or night. 

IMtone South 871. 

J. W. RUSStfLL JJUADKORD 

Attorn to v-aT-Law, 

r.02-r>oi Coppin Bldg. Covington, Ky. 

Will practice in all the courts. 

With 6. M. Rogers 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

«OsDI5NTIST^-* 
Will be at Burlington every Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and plate 
work a specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



NOTICE OE. DISSOLUTION 

Notice is fiereby given that the 
Big Bone Springs Hotel and Wa- 
ter Company, Incorporated, is (dos- 
ing its business and winding up its 
affairs. 

C. L. BONIFIELD, President. 

T. A. Nolan, Secretary. 



$300,000,000 Lost Yearly. 
The f armers of the Imlted Btates 
have been allowing WtN),(lO().000 in real 
money to escape from their pockets 
each year because of poor roads; ac- 
cording to the teathnony of experts 
who made a survey of the effect of bad 
roads upon markets for the depart- 
ment of agriculture. 



I Can Sell The Earth. 

List your farm with me. Give me 
a trial— just write description and 
number of acres and mail it to 

Win. E. BAIRI), Erlanger, Kv. 
Erlanger Deposit, Bank Bklg. sia 

DR. W. E. FISTER, 

Veterinarian, 

WALTON, KY. 

Calls by telephone answered night 
or day. 'Phono BO, 



BuihJins Plank Read. 
Kor the sake of economy and con- 
venience, a plank road constructed la 
[hm i n i iU pints ta being laid acroea the 
California desert 



Alaska has come to the rescue of tho 
world In many ways. Now It Is inti- 
mated that it will supplant Sicily as 
the chief source of sulphur. 



SJSSSSS 



MBMH 



■sssm 



One of tho most pathetic works of 

tut ll.«t can he placed l...r.>r.. the pub- 
lic Is a map ahowtog tho geographic 
expire noun of tierinaj)/ when the war 

- i ii ■ i i 

Tsk»> Yuur fount. v l'ap«r. 



eaesssi 



COAL 

_ The Famous 
Raymond City Coai 

X)nce Tried Alwas Used, 
Is Kept on hand constan- 

Prices the Lowest 

Give Us Your Coal Order. 



Ox Brand Fertilizer, made 
by Tennessee Chemical Co. 
We handle all grades. 

Petersburg Coal Co 



Petersburg, Ky. 

1 1 W. Kassebaum & Son, 

{(UNITE & MARBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large Stock on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 



Executor's Notice. 

All nerHons Indebted to the estate 
of E, T. Knit/,, decoamd, must come 
forward and settle nuuie, tlioso hav- 
ing claima against said estate intinl, 
prom tit them to the underslgaaa 
proven according to law. 

Mra. C.E.KIU'TZ, KxeautrjK. * 
Riley a Riler, Astys. 



Boone Co. farms Wanted. 

*> 

List your farms large or aoialt 
with me, and get a quick ash*. 
J. W. TAMFERRQ, 

Erlanger, K». 



I 



f 



4i 



,! 



* 



lamaafiSMi n usee 



SB 






BOONE I ,. CTNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY. JANUARY 3!. 1§IS # 



¥> 



'# 



It 



♦ 



LOANS TO FARMER8. 
• A total of 1,203 charters has beert 
issued op in date to rami lo 
riatlons, covering applications for ap- 
proximately 63 ioo.i .vd- 

illtlonnl charters are being Issued at 
tfte rate of fifteen (n twenty a day. 
The applications for loans average 
about ?50,ooo from each association, 
bo that, by tho year's end, the loans un- 
der investigation and in the making 
will probably reach a total of $130,000,- 
000, which is about equal to the 
amount upi'ioj rtated U> the farm, loan 
hanks as capital. There is no danger 
of an exhaustion of funds, however, 
says Philadelphia Record. The hanks 
obtain in amounts equal to the loan 
granted, so the Original capital is turn- 
ed over again and again. Moreover, 
the capital is Increased constantly by 
lho requirement that every borrower 
must Invest 5 per cent of the money 
borrowed in the share capital of the 
loaning bank. If the bonds should lind 
a mujk v, vlie supply of money to lonn 
would be practically unlimited. Inas- 
much as the bonds are guaranteed by 
the United Suites* and carry interest 
&t 5 per cent, they ought to sell read- 
ily. The formers can get all the credit 
they need. 



• 



The cz;ir made n bad mistake when 
lie consented to have a revolution start- 
led as a means of withdrawing from the 
War— if that Is whnt he did. Starting 
e revolution Is like setting a fire in a 
house. The trouble may get beyond 
control. Certainly It did In this case. 
At. the present moment the czar and 
his family are living in a iltit at To- 
bolsk, hut that Is not tV worst of their 
miseries. The authorities In the To- 
bolsk district are issuing food cards 
imd the Romanefffe must obtain their 
food the same as other c itizens, The 
probability is that the Czar with his 
food card /Mil flud It difficult to pro- 
v\ re caviare san dwiches th ree times a 
day. 



GIVE EWES A CHANCE 

it la well to give the breeding 

e'.ves an extra chance lit this 

lime to the end that they may he 
In good condition at the time n 
breeding. On their thrift and 
strength at breeding time i! 
pends largely our success with 
the coming crop of lambs. 

On most furms on which di- 
versified farming Is follow e d 
there Is opportunity for frequent 
change of pastur e* This is rel- 
ished by sheep more than by 
any other sto-k, and they re- 
spond quickly by laying on flesh 
and showing that thrift and 
strength so satisfactory to ev- 
ery floekmnsrer. 




HAVE WINTER GARDEN CROPS 



Lettuce and Radishes May Bs Grown 

for Holidays — Force Rhubarb in 

Dark Basement. 



So Umz us.- its nliftcaaureiaalrufiOBj. 
stant to the ideal for which the foun- 
ders and their enlightened successors 
labored, the United States will endure 
.respected and altogether worthy of re- 
spect. If a day should come when the 
imisslon and purpose of the United 
States were subordinated, through he- 
Tedltary attachment, blood sympathy 
or intellectual admiration, to the In- 
terests of a foreign nation, the prog- 
ress we have made and the fHlr possi- 
bilities of our future would be de- 
stroyed and wrecked. 



It is comparatively easy, if one Is 
willing to spend a little time In car- 
ing for a hotbed, to have several green 
vegetable crops throughout, a large 
part of the winter season, according to 
the horticultural department of the 
University of Missouri College of Ag- 
riculture. Ordinarily lettuce and rad- 
ishes may be planted in a hotbed soon 
after cold weather begins and they will 
be ready for the Thnnksgiving season, 
if well cared for. Another crop may 
be grown immediately afterward by re- 
charging the bed, and this will be 
ready by the Christmas and New Year 
holidays. 

Onions may be easily grown from 
seeds under the same conditions, pro- 
vided they are kept growing rapidly 
and the temperature does not become 
too high during the early part of their 
growth. After the coldest weather Is 
past, If the frames are not needed for 
starting an early spring crop, another 
crop, or even two, of the same vegotr.- 
bles may be had In the early spring. 

Another crop winch may be had in 



"Where . is the average man of 
small means going to keep his fifty- 
dollar bond?" The question has been 
asked in several .parts of the country, 
and In some parts hus been satisfac- 
torily answered by public-spirited bauk- 
ers who hare offered to undertake the 
safe-keeping of these bonds for their 
owners free of cost. __ . 



the fall b.v — t ransplanting about tho 
time frost is expected, is celery. This, 
when grown in the hotbed or PoM- 
frame, will be entirely self-blanching, 
which is an added incentive in usthg 
it in this way. 

Any thoroughly dark corners In the 
basement may be used for forcing 
roots of rhubarb or even asparagus at 
any time during the winter, and parts 
of the asparagus or rhubarb rows may 
be forced early in the spring hy build- 
ing a eoldframe over them ahout two 
months before the ground would ordi- 
narily thaw. 



SPREAD MANURE ON- FIELDS 



Loss of Plant Food by Fermentation 

and Leaching Ought to Be Pre. 

vented — Test at Wooster. 



Tho students who have been told 
(that "coal is bottled sunshine" will be 



To prevent loss of plant food by fer- 
mentation and leaching in hamyards 
and stables, manure should be spread 
nrr Ttnr conr ground diirtng the late 
winter and early spring months. 



surprised to read that Explorer Mac- 
millan says the land he has been over I 
in the Arctic region Is filled with coat; : 
for schoolboys don't associate that ter- 
ritory with sunshine. . . 

i ^ 

Oermrtn nofors have been ordered to 

appear on the stage clad only in old 

clothing, lest they arouse the envy 

:nf the populace. In America, should 

it become necessary, our stage will 

•likely economize by wearing as little 

as possible! 



The Pennsylvania agricultural de- 
partment has come forward with a 
plea to save the humble but useful 
:egg-producing hen and to kill her only 
,when she becomes old and worn out. 
tFor such is the gratitude of republics. 




• The theory of a forty-year limit of 
usefulness, mistakenly attributed to 
Doctor Osier, found many supporters. 
At present when a man indicates that 
lho is willing to work nobody stops to 



a&k his age. 



Manure Being Wasted. 

('■renter returns are obtained from ma- 
nure spread evenly over a large area 
than from the same amount .scattered 
heavily over a .smaller tract. 
As an average of 17 years' test at 



The feed controller's dictum that we 
shouldn't be paying the high prices 
would sound better If he will just tell 
,us what other way is open to get whnt 
we must have. 



l A Nebraska police judge says that 
women nre better liars titan men. This, 
however, Is one bit of flattery that 
woman will probably nol admit. 



A Pennsylvania farmer states that 
he obtained M heads of cabbage from 

one stalk. And yet 5-eent cigars have 
gone up to cents. 



} Camouflage achieves Its highest art 
fin the curl papers of the gray mora 
i l<n t become the coiffure of the gllt- 
te Ing evening. 



I That independent Polish kingdom 
Metal to hava BOSS into the discard 
,wllh the early mid honorable (Icimun 
'pence. ' 



f.. otsts. 



jhtt will nlm •vrvej 
nitoiuobllu 



M hand of fate never slap* a loafer 
*u> the back, 



the Ohio experiment station at Woos- 
ter, eight tons of manure per acre ap- 
plied to corn in a three-year rotation 
of corn, wheat and clover has pro- 
duced 25 bushels more corn than land 
receiving no treatment. Four tons of 
manure to the acre on both corn and 
wheat in a five-year rotation of corn, 
oats, wheat, clover and timothy has 
produced an increase of 14.H bushels 
of corn, as an average of lit) years. 
Eight tons of manure on the same 
crops In the same rotation hits ii> 
creased (he corn yield only 23.8 bush- 
els during this period. In other words, 
doubling the amount of manure has 
Increased the corn yield only 00 per 
cent. In order to apply the manure 
evenly and over a large area a ma- 
nure spreader is rec.mmiemled foj the 
experiment station. 

KEEP ONE STANDARD BREED 

8tick to it for Couple of Years, or 
Until Satisfied There Is Some- 
thing Better. 



if ,\ou wish, to go into thf poultry 

huslncHH m teiantle.iiu , leel 

Mtnmlunl breed nod >iui\ to ir for a 

isila 
'here H smn. Mei Mliltig 

i-i |. ui 
Another point < • mind i» that 

ion theHlid not »ell tsjfs wiie* every- 
body else la MsUUft that U whet) th# 
uiatsrt is lowest. 



APPLES PICKED FOR MARKET 



Time of Gathering Fruit Varies Con- 
siderably With Variety — Grading 
la Most Essential. 

Apple marketing plans should com- 
prehend picking methods, grading nnd 
sizing methods, kind or kinds of pack- 
ages to use. typo-; of pack if box pack- 
ages are contemplated, shipping meth- 
ods and facilities, storage and methods 
of m a rket ing the fruit to the best ad- 
vantage. . ^ 

The time of picking apples varied 
considerably wlih the variety. In any 
ease; however, fruit should be mature 
before any picking is done. Time of 
picking should be determined in part, 
also, by the use to which the fruit is 
put. 

(-trading and sizing may be done by 
machinery. Some form of grading is 
necessary to realize the highest profit. 




Dorikttltnral 

Points 





PUREBRED SIRE OF BENEFIT 



Use of Animal Will Resist in Great 

Improvement of Herd — Have 

Better Cattle. 




* a 


-e.es, 
... c 







V 



€-\ 



\-~e 



Fruit-Weighing Apparatus. 

A, Shoulder harness; B, sprins balance; 
n. scale tor welshing a maximum of CO 
pounds; b, scale calibrated to Indicate full 
box or parts of box in tenths; e, pointer, 
d, d, ropes; and e, e, steel hooks. 

Through proper grading one New York 
firm received two years ago a mini- 
mum of $3.56 a barrel for Its fruit and 
as high as $6 a barrel for the best 
grades. One experiment in honest gra- 
ding and packing is usually sufficient 
to convince any grower of the policy 
of the practice. 

The advantages of the various types 
of storage and the type best suited to 
hia conditions must be determined by 
the individual. For the commercial 

grower iced storage is by far the best. 
For the average farmer or the man 
catering to a small market, a different 
form of storage is essential. 

The co-operative plan of marketi ng 
apples has been very successful in some 
sections. 



There never has lieen a time when 
the common cow whs at such a dis- 
advantage to her owner as the pres- 
ent time. It takes a good cow to pay 
her way these times. A great many 
cows will be sold this fall because 
they would be unprofitable this winter, 
and yet every cow that will produce a 
calf is needed by the country. 

Is It not a good time to make a reso- 
lution and live up to it, to have bet- 
ter cattle? The common cow was all 
right for cheap land and cheap feed. 
She must still do to mother better 




Superior Purebred Bull. 

cows, for the great majority of farm- 
ers who still have common cows. Get 
a purebred sire this fall, and If you 
can, one that can be used this fall. The 
use rtf purebred-s i re s fo r ten year n will' 
generally result in^a herd that passes 
in appearance for 'purebred.'. Surely it 
Is worth while. A man is not as good 
a farmer as he can be, unless he is im- 
proving his herd. 



FISH MEAL GOOD FOR COWS 



MORE MULCHING IN GARDENS 

Roots of All Plants That Lie Jtict Un- 
der Surface Suffer From Freezing 
and Thawing. 



It would he greatly to our advan- 
tage to do mere mulching in our gar- 
dens and about our shrubs and fruit 
trees. Hoots of all phtnts that lie Just 
under the surface suffer from the al- 
ternating freeze and thaw of our bro- 
ken winters. The soil lifts as it thaws; 
consequently there Is- a misplacement 
of the roots. Their close contact with 
the soil' Is broken and their delicate 
root connections are often strained 
apart. Even our hardier plants would 
make more steady growth for mulch- 
ing. 

Careless mulching, however, may 
prove an Injury rather than a benefit. 
If applied before the ground has fro- 
gen nbou t -bu lb s and fleshy roo t s — it- 



Nutritive Value as Affecting Milk or 

Butter Production Compares Well 

With Cottonseed. 

The use of fish meal as a feed for 
dairy cows is not strictly a new feed, 
but only lately has tbo government 
seriously undertaken a study of it as 
a practical ingredient in dairy rations. 
, Fish meal is a by-product of the fish 
industry. Waste from salmon and 
i sardine canneries Is especially excel- 
lent for the manufacture of high-grade 
fish meal. 

Preliminary experiments made by 
.the U. S. Dairy Division show that 
the meal has no detrimental effect on 
the quality of milk or butter, and that 
the nutritive value of fish meal as 
affecting production compares favor- 
ably with cottonseed meal. An aver- 
age analysis of fish meal is as fol- 
lows: Wafer, 5 per cent; ash, 16; 
protein, CO; fnt, 14; salt. 5. 

Fish meal is manufactured from the 
fresh waste of fisheries by a process 
of sieaai cooking, pressing, and dry- 
ing. It Is preferably made from fresh- 
water fish to avoid too high a content 
Of salt. Dried-fish products, known 
as fish scrap of "pomace", are used 
considerably for fertilizing purposes 
nnd fish meal fed to farm, livestock re- 
tains all its valuable fertilizing prop- 
erties. 



COWS REQUIRE PURE WATER 



MANURE GOOD FOR ORCHARDS 

No Other Fertility That Will Stimulate 

Growth on Trees Better Than 

Barnyard Manure 

After fruit trees hear a few years, 
if the .soil was orgltttdly thin, a dress- 
ing of barnyard manure may be need- 
ed to keep the trees in growing con- 
dition and to insure the formation of 
fruit buds. It will be required that 
the trees grow every year in order 
that they may form fruit buds. Since, 
growth Is necessary, nitrogen in the 
soil will be necessary also, Warm 
soil may lack available nitrogen, 
hence the need of barnyard manure 
or commercial nitrogen. 

Old orchard soils may need organ! <■ 
matter. This the barnyard manure 
will also supply. There is no other 
fertility that will stimulate growth In 
trees better than barnyard manure, for 
It affords both organic matter and ni- 
trogen. 

In applying manure to large trees 
do not make the mistake of applying 
the manure close to the tree, around 
the trunk. The young roots where the 
plant food Is to be obtained for old 
trees may be considerable distance 
from the trunk of the tree. It Is a 
good practice to spread the manure 
us far away from the trunk as the 
branches extend, possibly farther. 
This will provide that the manure Is 
above many of the roots that are to 
absorb plant food. 



DANGEROUS SAN JOSE SCALE 



Insect Multiplies Rapidly and It Is 

Only Matter of Time Before 

Orchard Is Destroyed. 



{By rRKSSI.KT A. OI.ENX. Illinois Ag- 
ricultural Kxperlmenf-Station.) 

It Is difficult for one to realize fully 
the dangerous character of tho San 
Jose scale unless he has seen Its work. 
It feeds on the sap of the host plant. 
The amount of sap that a single indi- 
vidual, or even several hundred Indi- 
viduals could extract could not injure 
a healthy tree or shrub, but the species 
multiplies so rapidly,, that from a few 
scattered parents millions of progeny 
may be produced in a season or two. 
sufficient to cover completely the bark 
of parts, or even all, of the tree. Most 
of our insect pests have natural ene- 
mies which so restrain their multipli- 
cation that they become destructively 
abundant only now and then; but 
those of theJSan lose scale are inade- 
quate to its control. A young tree or 
shrub may be killed by the scale in 




Til 
KITC 



t 
rtEN 




IfclCABINCT 



An aspiration is a >oy forever. *7» 

havo many of these is to be spiritually 
rich.— Stevenson. 

Few things come to thos* who wait 
for others to do things for them. 



THREE MEALS A DAY. 







The conditions nnd prices all over 

the land are bringing our housewivee 

to put more 

_Vcfc- J? thought and prep- 

aration on the food 
for the family. 
Where the need is 
not urgent to ba 
economical the loy- 

ff^pJtattH'wsHk)! i,I,,v ot " (J " r womea 
'^^^^^^^^^" Win cause them to 

use every effort to> 
sa>,\ The amount of food served la 
hotels, restaurants, and In homes, baa 
been considerably lessened and with- 
out any feeling of dissatisfaction for 
the men of the family realize that 
their complaints will hinder the good 
work. 

In countless ways skim milk may, 
be used in place of whole milk, sav- 
ing just half the expense in milk. All' 
the valuable food materials are left 
In milk with the exception of fat. AJ 
teaspoonful of fat saved from the 
ment platter or broiling pan will when 
multiplied many times in the course 
of a week, make fat enough to enrich' 
many dishes. 

Maryland Chowder. — Use equal 
parts of canned corn and tomatoes, 
if the quantities vary it is still alt 
right. If the tomatoes are thick add 
a little water, a tablespoonful of 
minced onion or a little cold boiled 
onion. Pare and slice thin then par- 
boil three potatoes. Add these to tha 
chowder and simmer until tender.* 
Lastly add a pinch of soda, a cupful' 
of hot milk, a tablespoonful of butter 
and thicken with a tablespoonful of 
cornstarch which has been nibbed: 
smooth in a little milk. Serve very 
U01 Ml 111 ft lip -salttaesr ^ ^4- 



Grapefruit Salad. — Take a good- 
sized grapefruit, one head of crisp en- 
dive, which has been shredded very,j 
fine. Take out the pulp of a grape-, 
fruit saving nil the juice. Put all iu-< 
to a salad bowl with the endive and: 
dress with two tablespoonfuls of oil, 
two teaspoonfuls of sugar, a half-tea- 
spoonful of salt and a few dashes of; 
rod pepper. Toss and mix well add-; 
ing more seasoning if needed. A dash, 
of vinegar may be needed If the grape-; 
fruit is very sweet. 



- l 





ikemcrm 
G\Bi/\r 





ThjP average woman little under- 
stands the extent to which she holds 
the happiness, the health, and the 
character of those for whom she cooks, 
in the hollow of her hand. Dyspepsia 
which turns all the colors of life's 
rainbow to the blackness of'despalr, 
n ever conies through the fie ndlshneas 
of those who hate us. It is a blight 
up-.in our lives which is brought to us 
by those who serve our breakfasts, 
dinners and suppers,— Isabel Thurs- 
by. 



FOR THE DAINTY HOME TABLE. 



Supply Constitutes Three-Fourths of 

Volume of Milk and Demands 

Dairyman's Attention. 



offers shelter to the burrows of Held 
mice and invites them to a good feed 
supply as well. If applied after the 
gmund freezes it insures cold storage 
for the root system ua'il time for" a 
safe start in the spring, as h retards 
the thaw ing of the frozen soil. 



All animals require plenty of good, 
pure water. This is especially true of 
the milking cow, as water constitutes 
more than three-fourths of the volume 
of milk. The water supply, therefore, 
demands the dairyman's most careful 
attention. Stale or Impure water ts 



Mature Male San Jose Scale. 

two or three years; older trees with- 
stand the attack longer, Hut sooner 
or later are likewise destroyed. Young 
orchards are killed out more quickly 
than old ones; and where young trees 
are set In old infested orchards, they 
also become infested and die before 
they are old enough to fruit. Where 
this Insect is present, orchards or oth- 
er plantations containing trees sus- 
ceptible to Its Injury can only be pre- 
served by spraying. 



WINTER KILLING IS AVOIDED 



SET OUT ORCHARD IN FALL 



Generally Not So Much Pressure and 
Hurry of Work— Rains Will \ 
Settle the Soil. 

In the fall there Is generally not so 
much pressure nnd hurry of work as 
Is the case In the spring, nnd this la a 
good time to set out an orchurd. The 
rains of full and winter will set lho 
earth among tho roots so that growth 
can begin at the earliest moment In 
the spring. 



PRUNE SMALL BUSH FRUITS 



distasteful to the cow and she will 
not drink enough for maximum milk 
production. Such water also may 
carry disease germs which might make : 
the milk unsafe for human consump- 
tion or be dangerous to the cow her-! 
self. During the winter, when cows | 
are stabled the greater part of the . 
time, and unless arrangements havej 
been made to keep water hefore them > 
all the time, they should be watered j 
two or three times a day. If possihle, I 
the water should be 15 or 20 degrees i 
above the freezing point, nnd should i 
be supplied at practically the same i 
temperature every day. 



Many Orchardists Harden Trees 
Late Summer and Early Fall by 
Planting Cover Crop. 



in 



URGE SKIMMING RICH CREAM 



Saving Can Be Accomplished by Turn 

of Cream Screw, and la Well 

Worth Effort Required. 



Work May Be Done on Currants and 

Gooseberries Soon a* Leaves Fall, 

or In Spring. 

t'uriaitlM aud ifootteborrtet* uuiy be 
pruned as moou n* the leaves full : or 
the work uiaj be loft untU ring, 

tinea 
growth, and thin out surplus, dlsea«e.l 
or unlurirty ahoota. <»ld nutate may 
have two t hints el tbo i>re*eut year's 
til removed 



Tn skimming n hundred pounds of i 
35 per renl cream, 18 more pounds of; 
skim milk i* kept on the farm than] 
when the snme titnou it of 20 per cent ! 

cienm is taken, Tlila Hrvlng can be' 

accomplished by a turn of the cream 
screw, and Ml pte.n t feed prb •■ 
well worth the effort required. More 
skltn mill on th«< furms also , 
niorw rolvee ml furnish , inr.it 

milk for all Mt'H producer* nre 

|»«l«t for tlu« bUtlSffal I i eieum, not 

the water and other couetltnest*. 
Tale miliM It a4*i*«hte le eklut a 
rtch cream. 



Did you lo>e some of the trees in 
your orchard by winter-killing last 
year? It. K. Crulkshank of the Ag- 
ricultural College Extension Service, 
Ohio State university says that many 
orchardists are preventing winter-kill- 
ing b.v hardening their trees during 
the late summer and fall months. 
They cease cultivation in August nnd 
plant a cover crop of clover or rye. 
This takes the moisture out of the soil 
which ordinarily would be taken up 
by the trees, tirowth of the tree Is 
finished hy this time and the lack of 
moisture causes the wood to become 
firmer. Little damage Is said to OCCUf 
where this practice Is followed. 

AVOID HARM BY "SUNSCALD" 



Beet Preventive Probably la Whitewash 

—Liberal Amount of Salt Will 

Make It Stick. 

tMirluc the winter li the time when 

Injury i* done i>>- \*h*t la commonly 
termed "lamscalJ." Tha best pre 
<hitowe*li. Whitw 
«u mi i freak) stono 

lime will all if ■ liberal 

timasMl ot salt la *iM«*d. rioar past* 
or a moan amouat of gtua wtll alev 
fcuU> 




Where chestnuts are plentiful one 
tnny have many delightful dishes, 
which give both variety 
and nutrition. 

Cream of Chestnut 
Soup. — Shell a pint of 
chestnuts, cover with 
boiling water and boll a 
minute or two to loosen 
the brown skin, then dash 
into cold water when 
the skin will be easily removed. Add 
io them one quart of hot chicken or 
veal stock with a slice of onion and a 
stalk of celery; simmer ten minutes. 
Press through- a sieve and return to 
the heat, add a pint of scalded milk 
and thicken with two tablespoonfuls 
ench of butter and flour well mixed 
and cooked together. Season to taste, 
-simmer fiv e mi nutes awl serve— hoL 



Chestnut- Stuffing. — Prepare three 
cupfuls of chestnuts by shelling aud 
blanching, add a half teaspoonful of 
salt and cook until tender. This will 
take about fifteen minutes. Drain and 
mash line with a fork add a table- 
spoonful of butter, pepper and three 
tablespoonfuls of cr e am. Melt one ta- 
blespoonful of butter, mix well with one 
cupful of dry bread, add to the chest- 
nuts and it is ready to use. 

Nut and Olive Salad.— Put a cupful 
of shelled walnuts in a saucepan, add 
two slices of onion, one-half a tea- 
ipoonTip of Bait, one bay leaf and one 
blade of iiune. Cover with boiling 
water and boil ten minutes. Throw 
Into ice waier imiil chilled, then drain 
and dry on a towel, Cut four hard 
cooked eggs In quarters, two dozen 
Olives in long strips; mix the nut.i und 
olives aud marinate with French dress- 
ing; turn out on a planer lined with 
lettuce leave* nul garnished with eg;s. 

Pepper Hash. — Take four red pep- 
pers, ti\e green ones. .-.i\ uuloua, two 

bends Of cabbnge. all chopped line. 
•prluUlc with a ciipt'al of till uiul let 
stand over night. In t»>«* morning 
drain and add one cupful ol "oupir, one 
ouui • 1 1 • i > seeit, mustard 

■Sea] and vinegar to rarer >*ell Cover 
with n ■*■**■ Ms over a clean cloth sad 

11 .e lit ten il.»y#. 









THURSDAY, JANUARY 31. I9t.v 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



BOONE CO. RECORDER] Red Gross Notes. ~|M^^K^C^C3^K^S^3^2K}K2K! 

V». L. KIDDELL, F>ublisher. iM 

Ohio and K< 



III 




i Iflg January I. 

• » « • 
lli« h.>.\ which «m sent last; 

Thursday morning, the contents of 
which was published last ireelc, con- 
tained 906 -pairs of nocks, the addi- 
tional 20 pairs coining in late in last 
week. 

• • » • 
According t.i advice from armv 

.co ntonm e nt a in tin- Lak« Divison 
I sufficient sweaters and socks are on 
j hand to (ill all needs. But the sup- 

1 ply of knitted he 1 loots is short ..r 

Statement of the Ownership, Mann- I ""' den, * n <t- 
ppment, Circulation, etc.. Requlr-j ***' 

• d hy the Art of Aultu-i 1*4. liHii, I _ Only IT. af^i.ans Lave he. n sent. 
CM Boone < -onnty Recorder publish-] from the Lake Division, Ohio and 
«-d weekly at Burlington, K\.. tor Kentucky, in the last three mouths 
OetoiM-r 1st, rerr. 
Editor W. I.. K j*lri. M. Burlington. 
ManatmiK Editor W. I.. Rhid.ll. 
Hu: ' in^t i'ii. K\ . 

Bosim -s Manage] W. 
BtH'Hiurton. Kv. 

Publisher AY. 1.. Riddel 
ton. Ky. 
Owners: W. 1,. Riddeil. Bnrllng- A t . a n lor rest pilllMVS t .. inil . llltit 

- '"" ■ K ' V " u.eU; U+^y ar ,. H ; xA> j m -he* -ami 

Known bondholders, mortgagees, have but one slip or cover, while 
and othersegnrTty holders, holding 1 ' last fall's order asked for two. 
per cent or more ol total amount of I • •»* 

bonds. niort-M^..,,,otlnr securities j () ver SWA*) was realized from 
- I here are none. vadeville houses alone on Rod Cross 

, W ; L - } U \\ D * AA '■ i Theater Dav, 7. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me > 

* • - «... 1 . . w « 



!••. ;n- women oi Ohio and Ken- \\ 

- . have been Bhippe i from the .V 

division warehouse at Cleveland I W 

durum the three month* period end- 1 £4 

1 
| 

itt 



so the .Irtniors are really work in. 
something not over abundani . 
« * • • 
Las; Fi i, lay was a banner dav 
Riddeil; j the Burlington -£'*•'**:• •• 

i were working' arid M)nv< „.,.., 
Burluig-j than for some time. 



uU 



for 



STEPHENSON BROTHERS 

HEBRON, KV. 
Owing to the high cost of everything wc arc go- 
ing to sell for cash. It is easier to pay $5 than $25. 

SPECIAL ON GROCERIES: 

2 cans Corn 28c 

2 cans Pork and Beans 28c 

2 cans Peas 28c 

2 cans Saimon 35c 

2 large cans Peaches 35c 

1 can Old Ky. Baking Powder 1 Oc 

2 boxes Puffed Wheat -28c 

2 boxes Puffed Rice 28c 

Telephone Flour, per barrel $12.00 

FEED OF ALL KINDS. 
Wo ruu our truck to the city every day with coun- 
try produce. Give us a call. 

Stephenson Bros, - Hebron, Ky. 



K>^K:K^s:K:K3^K;Bxgca&gK3: 



thip 21st day of January 191S 

P. E.Cason. Notary Public, 
in and for Boom County. Kentucky. 
Mv eominissioti expires March IS, 
1918. 

WASTE OF IDLENESS. 



Finished work received last week: 

Florence— 119 9-inch compresses. 

Richwood— 1 pair socks. 

B. H. S.— 84 4-inch compresses. 

Burlington— 4 sweaters, 8 rest pil- 
lows, 5 9-inch compresses, 2HH 4- 
inch compresses. lf> sponges, 44 
(luffed dressings. 



there Are No Such Things as Non- 
essentials In Our Industries. 

New York Commercial. 
No factory should bo closed and 
no person should be deprived of 
work as long as the products can 
find a market unless other work 
can he found for 'the plant anil 
the tollers which is of more im- 
portance to the nation. There ; in Covington. 
are no such things as uonessen-i 

tials in our industries. Some are! shipments from ,,, 

needed more than others, hut alt | J* *"' 'instead ol being sent to Cleve- 
-aurxu Maae. ^ maftper-tf-iw- morc-H*"" 1 . Un ' r * a J Js oj'tmfr_nt hh.I 
than to please the eye. U . work" { u *f8* 
can be found for all in producin 



• * • • 
Word was received by the Countv 
Secretary that no phase of Red 
.Cross work should he allowed to in- 
terfere with the making of hospital 
garments or surgical dressing, espe- 
cially the latter. 

» * » * 
Miss Eunie Willis lias been asked 
to help In the instruct ion of the sur- 
gical dressing class how beiliir held 



Room countv 

i Cleve*- 

repack- 
Fr* f tl o Building, Cm 



Wise 



cmnati. 



foods, clothing, munitions of war' **♦• 

ships and other things of prime!,. M1 *g Bnnie Willis, who inspects 
necessity which help win the war. ! ,or Petersburg, expresses herself 
let them have precedence. | mt i as more than phased with the work 
avoid causing involuntarv idle- ! d() " e there. Gauze inspection is ub- 
•ness ually a most, tedious job, but she 

Sply r ioodS e for^SloT ^^ rsbur « Uni" prides itself Vu 
„i L ^u 1 • export niusti hav i worki ng i n gauze, aud 

L»ttl,S n ! d ° r WP Sh f! £ , really expected theirs to he the only 

to w££ race is re^orergn^ ^ S VV th ' w •*»* b,lfc BuiBnghi 

irori iSuL?^* ™t-« • . of"l H, ^ h I,:,s o fl e h »i' wll ° makes excel- 
land, wisest Oi nations xn trade i Hlf „„..,„ .|. MS ' nM 

affairs, is doing all that is nos- j ° a " / e dresh '" f B - 

sihle to maintain her foreign trade | _ mmi 

and supplant her enemies in in- 1 Tl!6re II Be a Hilt Time. 

^l U ^ &l - ma w et8 ' ?? d ' u whUe Th ere will be an old-time, red- 
ttZl*%'£t£^ n A* tter fi* 1 '™" hot Political campaign this year, 
S^rAJS mg v° th f U "r eo »^ aion g old party lines 
fHrtSS wfrt fc? ^r ? f no ^ eo ?- The war will not interfere in the 
w„, ' & i2L • e " ortsto ^ 1Dthp least with plans that are now 
w i America the strain is W ell under way for an old-fashion 
^rTnt'lr -sources are ed political scrap, in which Dem- 
greate,. hut ^e have no settled ocrat8 and Republicans will per- 
„„' form as usual, each side giving 

When a workman is idle the 'the other fits from the jump! 
community loses his value as a \ This is the latest development in 
producer and the cost of support politics, and it is hi^hlv inter- 
m £ J? 1 ™- makes no difference ; esting inasmuch a* there has 
whether he us fed hy relatives or ' been much speculation as to how 
mends, or in a pu b lic inst i tution -the-war will aff e ct, if it -affeete- 
or by unorganized charity, or by at alL the biennial struggle for 
his spending part or all of his masterv of Congress 
savings, the double loss is the Neither side has been inclined 
wo m r Wl™***" thp worst to lay aside polities and go in 
waste We must practice econo- ; for a coalition arrangement by 
'' -.rHSf.A 8 ... P|, "?siUcnt_Mcparrah, , which candidates for 'Congress 

agreement 



If you need Clothing now is the time to buy. 
You read from day to day how everything is ad- 
advancing, and there seems to be no stop to it: 
Or if you need anything in a 

Mao's, Young Men's or Bogs' 

SUIT or OVERCOAT 

Buy now. I have a complete line at prices that 

will satisfy you. 
A large assortment ot Sweater Ccats, Corduroy 
and Duck Coats, and Corduroy pants await your 
inspection. 

Selmar Wachs, 

605 Madison Ave., - Covington, Ky. 

One-Half Square North of Old Location. 

ill 



Meet all Requirements from 

PURITY 

to 

PRODUCTIVENESS 



Our seeds are the result of years of careful breeding 
and testing and of knowing where and when to buy. 

The Hill Standard in Seeds is the highest it is possi- 
ble to attain, yet we strive for improvement. 

Confidence in the house of HILL continues to grow 
just as surely as HILL'S SEEDS GROW. 

We will be pleased to send Samples and Quote 
Prices. Let us hear from you. Wo'll Save You Money 



United States Food Administration License Number G-01206. 



Public Sale! 



of the Mechanics and Metals Bank would fbe selected bv 
?L F" J° rk ' 8ay * : "HlHiUvisecl between the two parties 
i.SlJJa 11 UOU . S economy- meaning! then elected wi bout opposition, 
unemployment and closed factor- On the contrary, holh shies want 
ios would be demoralizing. It is : "to fight i' out" 

that l t ,,,«5n?a° VCTy * h ™ kil, S . mar, i , In thi * Congressional District it 
~-S k'istnesb must be sustained!, ! does not appear tha>^ Hon A H 

carefuUv *£<£%?*, u°\ ^^^ i ?k° US £ WiU haVe ^ ^Position for 
tr^tiJ glt about ' whereby; the Democratic nomination which 
SLw V OT B + t ner g^ s are trans- is equivalent to an election Mr 
sonal wS B fK atl t! iO r flH,r;R0u8e has made the d streict a 
the n^eds of ffe ^mtHctum of ! most excellent representative ana 
vv» S^°L thl armv i and na-Jthe masses of the voters do not 
vy . So " e of OU1, important in- ! feel Uke turning down a mi Mr 
duBtries have already K hurt ' official who has lien so Thor- 

1% cStteSf We £T m ! Wh ? b 22»¥y tricd and hS^ver Wi- 

ouV bodies ami ^ ,^p «n 0t Weak f n i Jf 1 t0 make » ood ' The "eh ana 
,k«*- v n )Ur fi n^n<-PS bv the poor, the hieh and +lio into 

abstinence born of p !in i c . We shai, : Democrat and Republican afe 

ed fltandard of hvmg. ; a mall of th „ , c d ^ » 

It a m a n hoarda a d ollar oe a : T ' C Q p le. _ Zj. 

bag of sugar it benefits no one 
while he hoWH it. If he lends the 
dollar or gives or .sell the sugar 
to the Government for the pros- 
ecution of the war he helps the 
nation. The hoarder is worse than 
the spendthrift. We must econo- 
mize, but we must neither hoard 
nor remain idle. Monev vrtaefor 
apent is not wasted; monev spent 
for nonessentials is put to 
use, but remains in circ 



Notice to All Concerned. 



January '24th. pus, 
Hun. A. B. House, 

House of R e p re sentative s • 

Washington, I). (' . 
Dear Bh- : 
Relative to your telephone re- 
to poor ; ? U * Ht this af ternoon. wo quote be- 
rculation. ' low a l >aia £raph f ; <,m the tele- 
esa while !? ram 8cnt a11 fl "' 1 administrators 
21st. which applies to 
...ion yon asked. 
All Wholesale and Retail stores 



I will sell at my residence just 
north of Burliiigtou, Kv., on 

Saturday, Feb. 9, 1918 

The following property : 
Bed loom Suites. Single Heds, 
Wash stan ds, Couches , Sett ee. Book 
Case, Hatrack. Carpets, JMolin. Din- 
ing, Kitchen and other work Tables, 
HtatinMand Laundry Stoves. KitcH- 
en Safe, Churn, MilkCoolers, 1-horse 
Carriage, Farm Wagon, Mowing 
Machine and. Plows, Wire Fencing, 
Fruit Jars, Dishes, Etc. 

Terms— Sums of $,",.00 and under, 
cash; over that amount a credit of 
six months will be given, purchaser 
to give note with good security pay- 
able at Boone County Deposit Bank, 
Burlington, Kv. 

MONETTE REV ILL. 
G. W. Sandford. Auctioneer. 
Sale to begin at 12 o'clock. 



To those who Have Sold To- 
bacco to Thompson & 
Wingate. 



For Sale. 



t -— • •vm«.u,'. in cireiuaiion. „ * — ' 

Mom:y hoarded is valueless while '? ram 8cnt 
m that condition. Let us keeoi anuarv 5 
money in circulation and labor at I'ftT.M 11 ' 

rk. Let ub give preference to , AU Wholesale and Retail stores 

requirements of the nation ' , IU H f , ood " v X' d •>>' both Pood 

keep labor employed in some ?"• < • Administrations on pa- 

f "ntU the Gov.einmenf eaa ! Mo i& grounds to close at noon 

i Monday « 



- circulation and labor at 
work. Let ub give preference 
the «— -> — 

but 
way 

find work for .-,11. " [( is lln i ik „] s 

that, tn-j Government can do that • now,8Hai 'y di.stribulion of food to 
so we shall have surplus labor' I 3 * /*** I* endangered by dosing 
including an armv of wo m -n who' H,ldl f, "" i Ht "r ( 'H they are atllb- 
>duce real weallh for' ex- ST y *° ll ' mai " Obon all day 
trade The |, Ne 0W«ty for remaining QpBa ,\, 



i on 
neceesarv 



exe.pt that wherever 
distribution of food to 



can pro 

port aud domestic 



1'no ■ , 

panic which obsesses thn mindso' ' dct ermmed by Local Food Ad- 

Mon» officluls, if allowed (,, h ,, r eaif ' ' m '«»"trator, who shonhl notify 

.can do more harm than anln>vad- u ' Fu '' 1 Administraior of each 

mg host. i <a»t> exempted, Hleaae. eoavej 

ilhiH information to Local INn 1 Ad- 
ministrators in your state." 



Wants List of Farmers. 

Th» moatoffice dep«rtn»nl al 

Washington has ordered tlu» po»t 
masUir at huilington to send in a 
IhH ot ull the farmers who get 
twsir mall at or through tho Pur- 
lington postoffirt.. and no doubt 
•very jjustmuster {n the «-ounly 
has received « like order. 



Vers Truly Voii'h. 

P. W NO YES, 
1 8 I'u I tdmlnietratiom, 
Director or Cooaei Vatkm, 

B, It Hunu< tit looking for *■ 
oiM- in thl* locallt* Who will 

tlt.» first to purchase th«. iati<»t 
model llu|. 



Cue acre land with frame house 
aud two outbuildings, } miles from 
pike; the property known as the Ca- 
bou school house situated on the pub- 
lic road leading from the Burlington 
& Belleview pike beginning near 
Mrs. Eliza Walton's to East Bend 
road. House cost $460 when material 
aud labor were about half cost of 
present time. All bids must be sent 
imderBeatrto J. C. Gordon, Superih^ 
tendent Schools. Right to reject 
any and all bids reserved. ThlH 
property Is suitable for home for 
suiali family or tenant house. 

Terms— 1-8 cash, 1-8 six months, 
1-3 in twelve mouths, deferred pay- 
ments to bear legal rate of interest 
with lein retained to secure deferred 
payments. 

Done by order Board of Education 
Boone Co., Jan. 8th. 1918. 

J. C. GORDON. Chairman. 
CHAS. KELLY, Secretary. 



Administrator's Notice. 

All persons indebted to the estate 
of Charles E. Clore, deceased, must 
come forward "am I settle said indebt- 
edness, and those having claims 
against said estate must present 
them to the undersigned proven as 
by law required in such cases. 

JOHN W. CLORE, Admr. 
of the estate of < Charles E. Clore. 



The biggest sleet of the season, 
was that which came last Satur- 
day night and Sunday. The trees 
supported a great burden of 
ie<* and Sunday morning boughes 
were bending under the heavy 
costing of toe, many of the weak- 
er glvuig wav and tumbling to 
tho «iit<th Travel was laborious 
i*dh man and boast, connt-t 
(juently Sunday was a very unlet 
<la> 

Tag* the RBCOBDIR. 



We will not receive any of our 
purchase of tobacco at Pet- 
ersburg. Your contracts call 
for delivery at Aurora and 



the unusual price was paid 
to insure its being- brought 
to the Aurora Loose Leaf 
Market the best in the coun- 
try. 

All tobacco must be in 
g-ood, winter order. No wet 
or fat-stemmed will be ac- 
cepted. Dealers make a dif- 
ference of 10 to IS cents in 
price where it is found in 
this condition. All tobacco 
now stripped mnst be hung 
before dlivered. 

We are sorry ri ver ' con- 
ditions have delayed delive- 
ry, but must ask onr friends, 
to be patient. We are ready 
to receive and pay for all to- 
bacco contracted for as soon 
as ferrying is resumed at 
Aurora. 

THOMPSON & 
WINGATE. 




f 



Phone Order Dept. S. 1855 or 1856. 




OUR BUSINESS IS BANKING 



We devote all our time, attention and energy to 
it. Very naturally, we want your patronage. 
What we have to entitle us to your business 
is wholehearted attention to your needs; court- 
eous and prompt attention to you; thirty years 
experience and more than $300,000 assets as se- 
curity for your business. If there is any thing 
lacking we do_not a ppe a r ~4o have diseovered-nv 



We appreciate pertinent suggestions for our im- 
provement, if you find it necessary. 

Call and see us if you want to borrow, de- 
posit or loan money. 

Boone 6o. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. % 

We will serve you in making your purchase of 
War Saving Stamps and Certificates, ^vithout 
charge. No tax on your deposits with uk 

3 Per Cent on Time Deposits. 




For Sale—Good Farm. 

9 

Worth the money, 150 uerfs in 
Boone county, easy day* drive of 
Cincinnati's markets. Good dwell- 
ing, 8 barns, level to rolling land; 
most all in grass; plenty of good to- 
bacco laud. Is on pike, well watered 
aud fenced; splendid neighborhood; 
on K. F. I). aud telephone lines. 
Price $70.00 per acre on very easy 
terms; alsoagardou farm of 4o acres 
near K. It. Station in Kenton countv, 
1 houses, ono 4-rooms Mid other H- 
rooins; large barn with new roof; a 
productive farm for fS,60U0O. Mitnv 
other farms in Itooue and Kenton 
cuuutles. Mouoy to loud on farm 
property. A number of desirable 
city properties to trade for farm*. 
>»s ••'II your farm. Tornado aud 
Wind fcitorui Insurance at lowest) 
rates. A. K. Foster A Hon, h-jh Madl- 
■on A vi' . Covlngtoit, Ky. 
Jan **■•! Phouf H, iuUO 



rtili 



II will have two carloads of DAYBREAK FER- 
TILIZER, pure animal matter fertilizer, in Erlan- 
ger, the last of January or the first of February: 
I will sell at the car or deliver it to your place. 

C. H. Y0UELL, . Limaburg, Ky. 




tM- 



BOONE COUNTY MOTOR GAR CO. 

(Not Incorporated) 

FORD SALES AND SERVICE, 
TIRES, TUBES AND ACCESSORIES. 

We are now prepared to deliver your car immediately 

Give us your Order before the Price go up. 

Touring Cars, $360-00. Runabouts, $345.00. 
F. O. B. Detroit. 

SE OUR & HICKS. 

UNION, KENTUCKY. 

i t— —41- I QI 



7 




Tfc 



■i^^^MMMM 



mmmmm 



"»"qp*T 



■■■ 



BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



THURSDAY, JAXUAJIS-M. WIS* 



ts 



* 



Public Sale! 




On account of having sold my farm on the East Bentf road, 
4 miles south of Burlington, Ky., I will offer at public auction, 
without reserve, on 

Thursday, Feb. 7, 1918 

The Following Property. 
9 milch cows, two registered, 2 fresh, 4 due to be fresh in 40 
days; 2 two-yr. old heifers, 2 one-yr. old heifers, 1 eligible 
to register; 3 Duroc sow* will farrow in March, Diirnc Boar 
3-yrs. old eligible to register; 2 1-2 H. P. Fairbanks & Morse 
gas engine and cutting box; road wagon, 2-h. sled. 2 Dixie 
Cultivators, jumping shovel plow, corn-drill, two section 60- 
tooth Columbian harrow, 1-h. wheat drill, Sharpies Cream 
Separator in first-class condition, 15-gal. bbl. churn good as 
new, stack No. 1 timothy hay, 4 8-gal. cream cans, good 
buggy* 700 tobacco sticks, X-Ray 150 egg incubator, 500 
little chick brooder, lot Red River Early Ohio seed potatoes 
4 doz. chickens, 18 cow chains, forks, shovels, hoes, etc, some 
Household and Kitchen Furniture. 



Terms — Sums of $5 and under, cash ; over $5 a credit of six months will 
.be given purchaser to give note with approved security payable at Citizens 
Deposit Bank, Grant, Ky. Sale to begin at 12 o'clock sharp. 



Mrs. Addie Pope, 



A. D. WILLIAMSON, Auctioneer. 



STOCK OF GOODS AND FIXTURES 



—AT- 



Public Sale 

As administrator of C. E. Clore, I will sell, begin- 
ing at 10 a. m., at the Store House, in Hebron, Ky. 

Saturday, Feb. 2n, 1918 

i 

The Entire Stock of Goods and Fixtures carried the Store 
~T~ ~^yC. E. CloreT 



FLORENCE. 



Thk Stock consists of General Merchandise including 
everothing carried in a first-class country store. Also the 
Gasoline Tank, Pump and Lighting Plant. A complete 
list of the stock can be seen by calling on the undersigned. 
The stock will be sold as a whole on a credit of six months, 
the purchaser to give note with good security. 

JOHN W. CLORE, Administrator. 



Bert Marksberry is very sick. 
with ©or© throat. 

J. S. Surface and wife were Sun- 
day guests at Lloyd Aylor's. 

Charles BeaU and Miss Minnie 
Baxter were Sunday guests of 
Miss Edith Carpenter. 

Julius Corbin, who fell and hurt 
one of his legs several days ago 
is able to be about again. 

Miss Kate Clutterbuck, of Cin- 
cinnati, is here assisting to nurse 
her brother, Ed. who is very ill 

L. E, 'Tanner, who resides on the. 
Union road, is verv ill of a. sore 
throat. 

Miss Mary Grogan, for many 
years a resident of Florence died 
in Cincinnati, Wednesday morning 
of last week. 

The many friends of Mrs. Emma 
Conner, mother of Roy Conner, 
will be surprised to hear of her 
death, which occurred on Wed- 
nesday night of last week. She 
ltVotl~OTTry a— few hou rs aft er — her 
arrival hei-e from Tennessee. Bur- 
ial here last Friday. 

Miss Mary Elizabeth Baucis en- 
tertained her class and several 
friends last Friday evening:. Those 
present were Misses Willa Yealy, 
Sarah Northcutt, Mildred Eddins, 
Marie Scott and Messrs. Wilford 
Mitchell, Winfield Myers, Ross 
Conrad and Charles Corbin. 



FOR SALE. 



Pure bred Jersey Bull calves from ^ood producing dams and sired 
by a bull whose dam made 38 lbs. milk, 2:47 lbs. butter in 24 hours 
with second calf; granddam made 19 lbs. butter in7 days and milk- 
ed over 12,000 lbs. in one year ; also one good calf by above bull 
out of a cow with a record of 45 lb. of 7 per cent milk in 24 hours. 
Apply to R. B. HUEY & SON, Burlington, Ky. 



FOR SALE. 



High grade Holstein Heifer calf three weeks old ; dam a first- 
class grade cow, sire a registered bull ; good size and nicely mark- 
ed, $15 if taken at once. Also several registered bull calves and 
two sows and pigs. HUBERT CONNER, Hebron, Ky. 



The Weather. 

Tlie weather this winter has had 
a tendency to go from bad to 
worse all the time, and it was 
thought the limit had been reach- 
ed when the big snow* began to 
show a disposition .to melt last 
Friday but Saturday brought a 
change in -the weather that made 
locomotion perilous in the ex- 
treme. A person could travel 
about through the snow without 
taking the risk of falling and 
killing himself or breaking a limb, 
but not so by the middle of the 
afternoon Saturday when a heavy 
•leet covered the ground ana 
pedestrians found rt laborious 
and dangerous going from place 
to place. Where the mow had boeni 
removed from the side walk* 
purtoiM cut all kinds of «hin«* 
in trying to use them and in 
•ome {affiances hurd falls wsretbo 



Fowler Won as Usual. 

A story-telling contest was pull 
ed off at Kelly's store one night 
last week, in which Harry Zumdic, 
the candy kid, of Covington, and 
Jailer C. A.. Fowler were the lead 
ing contestants, the latter being 
declared the winner and was 
awarded a leather loving cup. 
Those who were present at the 
contest say it was a hummer 
from start to finish. 



results. 



[I 



HE Did His Beet. 

John Conrad made herjic- «f- 
lnrts to get the mails to the 
offices on his route on schedule 
time, but notwithstanding bo 
could not make connections, una 
nobody foxpectod him to under 
the conditions he had to contend 
with. Several days the trip from 
Covington to Burlington and re- 
turn was about as pnrdoun as 
'•going over thn top' 1 »n Fran 



DEVON. 



k 

Ben Cook has received his new 
Ford. 

Dan Huseman waa the guest of 
James Bristow, Sunday. 

Mrs. C O, Carpenter has been 
sick the past few days. 

Mr. and Mrs, Ambrose Easton 
were in the city, Wednesday. 

Mrs. John Roacho visited rela- 
tives in Cold Springs last Tuesday. 

Miss Mabel Huseman is spend- 
ing the week with relatives in 
the eity. 

The deep snows have — great l y 



inconvenienced the iiostmen and 
milk men on their routes. 

Miss Anna Norman, of Coving- 
ton, came out Thursday and re- 
mained until Monday afternoon, 
guest of her parents. 

Geo. Jones, of Covington, came 
out Saturday afternoon and re- 
mained until Monday afternoon, 
the guest of frienda here. 

Mr. and Mrs Jno, Hogrife, who 
have been here the past month, 
guests of their parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Effie Hogrife, returned Wed- 
nesday to Pittsburg, where Jno. 
has a very nice position. 



CONSTANCE 



Mrs. Sadie Ingram, of Riverside, 
Ohio, died last Saturday after an 
ulnee* of about a year. She was 
the wife of Al Ingram, and la 
survived by her husband, father 
and several brothers and sisters, 
who deplore her death. Burial at 
Constance on the 88th Inst. 

Autos, wagons, cattle and peo- 
ple have been crossing the river 
here on tho ice (or some time. 
Tl . auto of Charles Williams, of 
KiorslcU*. stalled in the snow 
while crustmir the rive* the other 
day, and Walter Klasseraer wont 
to fua rwseue with a horse and 
Itulfced ttrtl machine loth* shore 



County News Items 



Interesting Facts Gathered Durintf the Week by Our 

Regular Correspondents. 



5 



HEBRON. 



s 
s 
s 



On account of bad weather there 
were no church services last Sun- 
day. 

Miss iMamio Garnett will have 
charge of the telephone exchange 
here this year. 

The little daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Barney Turner, who was 
very sick, is improving. 

Mrs. Alii© Walton, Robt Aylor, 
Frank Aylor, Henry Lee Aylor 
and Morris Rouse have measles. 



HUME. 



s 
♦ 



Here's Another 
Good Reason- 
All Prosperous 
Stores Advertise 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
♦ ♦ 

♦ UNION. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 



Mr6. Susie Utz has been improv- 
ing since lasT week. 

Stanley Utz and wife spent last 
Sunday at E. E. Utz's. 

The meeting of the Red Cross 
unit was well attended last Wed- 
nesday. 

Wm. Wilson spent from Friday 
until Sunday with his daughter, 
Mrs. Cross; 

J. O Huey and family, of Bur- 
lington, spent last Friday night 
and Saturday at J. C, Bristow's, 

Mrs. Arch Rouse was called to 
tho bedside of her- mother, Mrs. 
Toney Rue, who was verv sick 
last week. 

Misses Iva Presser, Nannie 
Kathryn Bristow Mabel Rouse 
and Messrs. Arnold Con ley ana 
Holly Utz, of this vicinitv, went 
to Burlington, last week,' where 
they took the common school 
graduation examination. 



Married, January 15th, at New- 
port, Ky., Harry R Roberts a-no 
Miss Mamie Huff, of Hamilton, Ky. 
The bride is tho daughter of 
William Huff and an excellent 
young lady. The groom is the son 
of T. B Roberts, one of Hume's 
best young men, moral and indus- 
trious and well liked by tho 
community. Congratulations and 
best wishes are extended them. 
Thoy will reside near Burlington, 
as the groom is a linemanf for 
the Consolidated Telephone Com- 
pany in the northern part of 
the county. 

Miss Kathrine Binder was the 
guest of her brother, John. sev-» 
eral days last week. 
— This writer entertained TSBtr 
week Mrs. Jeff Miller, of Br ashler; 
Mrs. J J. Allpbin, of Berkshire, 
and Mrs. T B. Roberts. 



Save Fuel. 



ighway 

which 

since 

do his 

condi- 
Eduea- 

passed 



GUNPOWDER. 



Feed is getting scarce. 

Miss Beatrice Aylor has several 
Rhode Island Red loosters for 
sale. 

_ liea,-Br art ford- bought -tt load of 
hogs of Hubert Bachelor one day 
last week. 

For Sale— Stack of clover hay 
Apply to Mrs. Ellen Smith, Un- 
ion K. D. 

For Sale— Fresh cdw with calf 
by her eide. Apply to J Hi Tur- 
ner, Florence R. D. 

Harvey Rouse, of Long Branch 
neighborhood, was transacting bus 
mesa in Erlanger last Thursday. 

Bert Clore and wife entertain- 
ed R. E Tanner and wife aud this 
scribe and wife on Wednesday of 
last week. 

f Th ? rain ,ast Saturday put the 
finishing touches pn the snow, 
and Sunday it was so slick a per- 
son could scarcely get about, but 
have heard of no accidents. 

The roads were blocked three 
times by snow last week, ana 
shoveling the beautiful was the 
principal employment in order to 
keep the roads open to travel 



FRANCESVILLE. 



♦ 

: 

sesesseeesesssessssssessss 

Emmet KilgouFs children have 
measles. 

Mr. and Mrs Geo, Jenkins, of 
Ashland, have moved here to Mr 
Collier s farm. 

\f^L\^ S P eston and daughter, 
wiss Rhoda, were shopping in Cin 
cinnati, Saturday. 

Miss Alice Hafer, of Hebron, 
S«h the guest of her friend v Misa 
Rhoda Eggleston, last Tuesday 
night. 

Mr. and Mrs, L T. Estesof near 
Cloves, Ohio, and Bessie and Otto 
Muntz were Sunday guests at W 
H. Eggleston's 

C. K Scothorn and wife ent< r- 
tained Mr. and Mrs J W. Grant 
of BulHttevaie, and Clint Rid deli 
and wife Sunday. 

&• T « Estea and wife, T, B. Ee- 
gleston and Chris Whkaker, Sr., 
were transacting business in Bur- 
lington, Saturday. 

Mrs Sarah Scothorn, Mrs Cruse, 
Mm Mike Stahl, E J. Aylor, Wi. 
Goodridge, Sr., and Miss Dollie 
Goodndge are sick. 

♦♦♦♦»*»»ssssss»ose»»»»»V» # 

♦ PT. PLEASANT. ♦ 



>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 

VERONA 



Saturday, Jan. 26th, St Patrick's 
church was the scene of an ex- 
ceptionally pretty wedding when 
Miss Agn'«s Ryan, the lovely 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs, Michael 
Ryan was united in marriage to 
Mr. Charles Farrell. The solemn 
and "Impressive ceremony which ] 
made them man and wife was | 
performed by the pastor, the Rev. 
Hubert Schmitz, before the little 
altar which was beautifully ana 
tastefully decorated with wreaths 
of evergreen and flowers. The 
charming bride was daintly attir- 
ed in a gown of white lace over 
deep blue batiste and wore a hat 
to correspond. 

Miss Margaret Ryan, sister of 
the bride was the bride's maid, 
and was dressed in rose color 
batiste with hat to match. 

The handsome groom wore the 
.conventional black, and was at- 
TendecT by Mr. Leslie T?bde, 

Despite the inclemency of the 
weather the church was crowded 
with friends and relatives, who 
came to witness the happy event. 

The bride has always "been a 
model christian and one of the 
churches most willing workers. 
Her sweet disposition and sunny 
nature has made her well loved 
by all who knew her. 

The groom is an excellent 
young man whose many sterling 
qualities have won for him a wide 
circle of friends. 

Mr. and Mrs Farrell will make 
their home on his farm near here. 

Their many friends wish them 
many •fTT.rs of undisturbed happi- 
ness and prosperity. 



Owing to the weather, h 
and fuel conditions, over 
no one has control, and 
each one is asked to 
"bit" in our straightened 
tion, the County Board of 
tion met January 29 and 
tho following order : 

ORDER. 

It is hereby ordered that all 
schools ^^~: — *-*•»-»• +m£ boam 
has jurisdiction be closed on 
Friday, February 1st. 1918, and 
remain closed \until March 1st, 
1918. 

This order shalt not apply — to 
schools in which the attendance is 
40 per cent, or more of the census 
reported in said district and where 
said schooV has sufficient fuel to 
keep the school house comfort- 
able during the remainder of the 
session. 

The subdistrict trustee is to be 
the sole judge as to the fueL 
and is held res]>onsible for the 
fuel condition, but the teacher's 
register decides attendance, which 
shall be based on the last twen- 
ty days taught before February 
2, IMS. J C. GORDON, 

Superintendent. 



Running on Low Then. 

Forty years ago Boone county's 
annual running expenses were less 
than $5,000, and the Justices of 
the Peace were trying to econo- 
mize in every direction possible. 
Suppose those who composed the 
fiscal court in these good old 
days had to tackle the county's 
financial problems of today? They 
would give up in despair before 
they completed tho provision of 
funds for a single department of 
the county's business, and won- 
der from where the money is to 
come that is neceasary._to .finance . 



her for twelve months. Wonder- 
ful have been the changes in the 
last half century and more won- 
derful changes will arrive in the 
future. 



'James Brown and wife entertain 
ed several of their relatives from 
Florence recently. 

On account of tho deep snow 
there was a small attendance at 
school last week. 

+u Pe01 ^ *" this neighborhood are 
thankful to those who so kindly- 
permitted travel through their 
premises diiring tho anow block- 
ade. 

Many birds perished during the 
cold weather, and a large chicken 
hawk that was too weak to make 
i 4 ^? ca P e ' wa * Picked up bv O. 
J. Allen a few days ago. 

Uncle Henry Horton died at the 
home of H. V Tanner, on Monday 
night of last week about 9 o'clock, 
after two weeks suffering. The 
funeral services wow conducted by 
Rev. H C Runyan at the home 

? t J 1 ^ •"■£**' *"*• Butler Ranes, 
last Thursday. Interment in Con- 
stance cemetery. 

Mrs. J R Smith received a let- 
ter tho other day announcing the 
swious illness of heart disease of 
her swt<r, Mrs. J J feary at a 
hospital in Jacksonville, FU. 

Last Hundsy Mrs. Courtney Wal- 
too, of Krianger, fell and hrok* 
on* of hsr wrists 



A. C, Roberts was at Walton, 
last Monday. 

J. Newton Powers has a new- 
talking machine. 

The fuel administrators order 
has been observed here. 

Cloyd McClure. who is quite ill 
with spinal trouble, is no bet- 
ter. 

The fuel situation will be quite 
serious should cold weather con- 
tinue for any length of time. 

Rev. Arthur Jackson, of Louis- 
ville, filled his appointment at 
New Bethel church last Sunday. 

Geo. W Roberts, who had the 
misfortune to get kicked by a 
horse three weeks ago, is slowfy 
recovering. 

Miss Salli? Vest, assistant post- 
mistress at this place, has ac- 
cepted a position as clerk at 
Washington, D. C , and took her 
departure for her new quarters 
last Monday morning. 

Mrs. Marion Bagbv passed to 
her reward last Friday morning 
in her 72d year. She died of par- 
alysis. She was living to herself 
at the time and was found by 
a neighbor in an unconscious coo 
dition, and lived until the next 
morning. She was a faithful mem- 
ber of Concord Baptist church. 
The funeral took place at Concord 
Sunday morning, discourse by 
Rev. Simpson, after which the 
remains were laid to rest beside 
her husband in Coucoid cemetery. 
Undertaker .L. J H 
c harge of — the funeral 



Sent Exhibit to Corn Show. 

Stevens Bros., of the Idlewild 
neighborhood, sent a box of corn 
to Lexington for exhibition at the 
Corn Show. They have a state- 
wide reputation as growers of fine 
corn for that purpose. They have 
had great luck at past corn shows 
in which they had exhibits. 

State News. 

The article appearing in last 
Tuesday's issue of the Messinger 
with regard to the large amount 
of fish being caught by Col.Chas 
Poindexter, of Garrard county, was 
taken seriously by our good friena 
Edward Williams, of Junction City, 
assistant Game Warden, and caus- 
ae him to make a drive to this 
city last Wednesday morning when 
the mercury was hovering around 
zero.— Danville Messenger, " 



United States Marshal R. C 
Ford, of Covington, came to Bur- 
lington, last Monday and arrest- 
ed J. E Hall, the local barber, on 
a warrant charging him with vio- 
lating the fuel order requiring the 
closing of all business houses on 
Monday for the conservation of 
fuel except such as are exempt- 
ed by the order. Mr. Hall was 
taken to Covington, where he 
gave bond ^o^the sum of $1,000 
for his appmrance at the April 
term of the United States Court 
to answer any indictment that 
may be found against him. Mr 
Hall states he did not open', his 
place until noon that tlay, and 
as the stores about town did 
not close until noon he thought 
he wai entitled to keep open half 
a day as other business houses ir> 
town had done. It making no dif- 
ference which half of thr» day he 
observed. He says the order was 
not fully understood by any one 
at that time, and that his* vio- 
lation thereof was purely a re* 
■ult of not knowing what «ai 
required of him and not that he 
wanted to disobey it. 

The county •shosl board w is in 
•eealon, Tuesday ind <>r«ter«»»i the 
school* under it* control rioted 
under certain conditions. The of- 
fleUTl or4»»r U pub'lshid <>-|*wwhero 
in this istu, 



L. L. Wolfe, of near Short creek, 
brought to our office on !Friday 
last an oar of corn, or rather four 
teens ears in one. There is one 
large ear which measures twelve 
inches in length, and around the 
center are thirteen small ears ful- 
ly developed. His son, Howard, 
found this ear when he was gath- 
ering corn this fall, This is one of 
most unique freaks of nature "We 
have ever seen.— Falmouth Outlook 
♦♦♦♦ 

J. H White, of Paint Lick, Gar- 
rard county, was in Danville, Sat- 
urday, marketing his crop of navy 
beans. He raised five acres and 
produced fourteen bushels to the 
acre. The beans are worth $10 a 
bushel or $10 per acre and the 
cost of production was compara- 
tively small. Mr White will put in 
a still larger crop next year.— Har- 
rodsburg Herald. 



Dillard Brine gar, oi the White 

Oak~se,ctioh of th i<s county , was at 



the Sun office, Tuesday, and was 
telling us of a large copperheaa 
snake he had killed Monday. He 
said he put an old hollow £kunk 
of wood in his fire place, and that 
when the chunk began to burn a 
big snake crawled out with seven 
young ones. fThe mother was 4 
feet and 3 inches long, and was 
one of the largest oi this species 
ever killed in that neighborhood. 
— Ivin Sun. 



It appears that the only way 
by which a store can remain open 
after 19 o'clock, noon, on Monday 
is by obtaining permission from 
the County Fuel Administrator, 
who is Dr. E W, Duncan,K>f Bur- 
lington. Where an order is toft to 
tlie eonstruction of everybody 
each one will construe it to suit 
himself and the result Is the or- 
der amounts to- nothing been use 
of a lack of uniformity. A mbrhty 
safe plan is to close your storo 
at noon on Monday, and then uo 
question can be raised. 

Wulliam O'Dunaway wa» lujed 
$25 and costs and sentenced toll) 
days in the Krlangcr jail last Mon- 
day by Police Judge Henry Chil- 
dercss on a rhanre of disorderly 
conduct. Marshall Henry Myers 
who srnsnttid O'Dunaway, said th«- 
prisoner *nok«» dbraapertfulU 
Pn^idrnl WUsoa. 



M 






eeiMB 



BlBHB^iiiiiBBBHB^BeMi 



THURSDAY, JANUARY 31. 1911^ 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



*•.!. 



NEW KITCHEN CARD 



Food Administrator Sackett 

Makes Provisions President Calls Upon AH Loyal 

Known Americans to Unite 



HELP TO SAVE FOOD ! LIV'E 

3 I wwf\ 



in Campaign 



Kentuckir.ns Are Advised of Additional 
Requests of Government in Re- • 
pard to Conservation of Food Sup- '' 
ply of the Naticn. ; 



CHEAPER BEEF FROM SILAGE 



Louisville, K.v., Jan. 26. — Following 
the issuance of a proclamation by 
President Wilson palling for additional 
food economics, Federal Food Adminis- 
trator Fred M. Sackett today made 
known to the people of Kentucky the 
contents of tue Kitchen Card. Thi3 
card, which supersedes the Kitchen 
Card distributed duriug Fledge Card 
Campaign Wee!;, Octqber 2Sth to 
November 1th, .alls upon all tue peo- 
ple of America to observe two wheat- 
less days weekly, one meatless day 
and one porklesa day, as well as a 
uit-atless meal every- 
day. Heretofore, only one whc.&tless 
and one nytimlgga day aa.ve btcu con- -, 



of Food Administration 
Will Enable the United States to 
Meet Great Responsibility If Prompt 
Action Is Taken, Declares President. 



Washington. Jan - -6.— Following is 
text of President Wilsons food savins 
proclamation: 

Many cause:* have contributed to 
create the necessity for a more inten- 
sive effort on the part of our pcoplo 
-to save food in order that we may sup- 
j ply our associates in the war with the 
'susrenance vitally necessary to them 
in these days of privation and stress. 
The reduced productivity of Europe 
because of the large diversion of man- 
powpr to the war, the partial failure 
of harvests am? the eliminate: " the 
most distant markets for foodstuffs 
through the destruction of shipping, 
places the burden of their subsistence 
very laigely on our shoulders. 
The food administration has formu- 



Successful Experiment Conducted at 

South Dakota Station by 

Director Wilson. 

A load of steers was recently mar- 
keted in Chicago by the South Dakota 
experiment station which hnd been fed 
only corn silnge during a period of five I 
months, and brought as killers within 
51.50 as much per hundred ns the best 
steers sold. The steers were on the 
road wlthont any feed In the car for 
85 hours and shrunk only 49 pounds 
per head on n rainy day. The average 
gain per head during the 148-day feed- 
ing period was two pounds. These 
steers consumed 97 tons of silage and 
made a gain of 5.921 pounds, or an av- 
erage of 296 pounds each. 

This successful experiment was per- 
formed under the direction of James 
•W. Wilson, professor of animal hus- 
bandry and director of the experiment 
station, and explodes the theory that 
corn silage should be fed sparingly and 
only as part of a ration for dairy cows. 
"What a wonderful saving it would be 
for this country," says Director Wil- 
son, "if all yearling steers had made 
an average gain Inst winter of two 




* TME 
KITCMEN 
CABINET 

More dangerous than a little knowl- 
edge is much knowledge of things that 
aren't so. 





HIGH-CLASS HORSES WANTED 



aidercd necessary. i 

The new regulations are addressed 
particularly to the women who signed 
the pledge cards, since they promised ! 

to -follow the diroctions and advice lated suggestions which, if followei. 
of the Food Administration" in so far I wlu enable us to meet this great Te- 
as their circumstances permit. The sponsibility* 

women are expected, however, to in- 1 In order that we may reduce our con- ! '»°" nrts ^ T n «- ad ' m * ""»« more tnRn 
. , , ' . ... . %. , the same-aged 6teer usually inukes on 

duce tiie members of their families to sumption of wheat and wheat products j 

follow these directions also, and the j by thirty per rent— a reduction Imper- .. TI * e copn plant WUta cured jn lt9 
proclamation of the President makes ' atively necessary to provide the sup- 1 own j U ' cca seems to be nu excellent 
it plain that tbe population of America' ply for overseas — wholesalers, jobbers feed to produce gnln — nothing better 
must respond unanimously and with and retailers should purchase and ra- 
ft joyful heart If the war is to be wou. sell to their customers only seventy 



No Hardships Imposed. 

Although the new restrictions call 
for the abridgment of .long-established 
habits, the new Kitchen Card does not 
impose any hardships. As yet. the 
American people still are not required 
to make any sacrifices in the matter 
Of foofl to win the w.ir The most any 
person is asked to do is to siifft-r some 



• per- cent of the amounts used in 1917. 
i All manufacturer;; of alimentary pastes, 
i biscuits, crackers, pastry and break- 
fast cereals should reduce their pur- 
chases and consumption of wheat and 
wheat flour to seventy per cent of 
their 1917 requirements, and all bakers 
of bread and rolls to eighty per cent 
of their current requirements. Con- 
sumers should reduce their purchases 
of wheat products for home prepara- 



Animal That Performs Work Most Effi- 
ciently and Sells at Profit Is 
Most Desirable. 

The njost desirable horse Is the one 
that performs the work required most 
efficiently and economically, and sella 
at the greatest profit. Dnder aver- 
age conditions this horse will com- 
bine size, substance, style, step and 
quality. Kothlng adds more to the 
value of a big horse than style, action 
and quality. 

A big horse without these three 
things is a very undesirable, unsatis- 
factory nnd expensive form of mo- 
tive power, either on the farm or in 
the city. Bach year sees less demand 
for inferior horses, both large and 
small, and a corresponding Increase 
in the value of high-class horses of 




when we consider cost. And when we 
consider the hundreds of acres where 
only part of the crop is harvested' — 
the ears — and the stalks and leaves 
and husks allowed to waste, we are 
not very near the maximum stage of 
production." . 



SANITARY HOUSES FOR HOGS 



l tion to at least seventy per cent of ' 



slight inconvenience. , 

The new Kitchen Card, which the ' those of lust year, or, when buying 
President approves and hands to the , bread, should purchase mixed cereal 
nation as a book of rules for winning : breads from the bakers. 



Animals Will Respond Very Quickly to 
Clean Surrounding: * vie*** 
Harbor Vermin. 



-rr 



Subttitute Potatoes. 
To provide sufficient cereal food, 



the war, is as follows: 
"The Food Administration asks' 

every loyal American to help with!. 

... , homes, public eating places, dealers 

the war by maintaining rigidly as a L, d manufacturers should substitute 
minimum of saving the following pro- potato vegetables, corn, barley, oats 
gram: (and rice products, and the mixed ce- 

"Have two wheatless days < Monday j real bread and other products of the 
end Wednesday i in every week and ' bakers which contains an admixture 
one wheatless uieul in every day. ! of other cereals. 

"Explanation: On wheatless days! ln order that ''otisuuiptiou may be 

and in wheatless meals of other days i restrif:tet1 t0 lhis euent - Mondays and 

Wednesdays should be observed us 

J wheatless days each week, and one 

meal each days should be observed as 



days I 
use no crackers, pastry, macaroni, 
breakfast food or other cereal food 
containing wheat and use no wheat | a wheatless meal. 



flour in any form except the small 
amount that may be needed for thick- 
ening eoups or gravies or for a binder 
in corn bread and other cereal breads. 
As to bread, if you bake it at home, use 
other cereals than wheat, and if you 
buy it, buy only war bread. Our ob- 
ject is that we should buy and cou- 



In both homes and public eating 
places, in order to reduce the consump- 
tion of beef, pork and sweet products. 
Tuesday should be observed as meat- 
leas day in each week, one meatless 
meal should be observed in each day; 
while, in addition, Saturday in each 
week should further be observed as a 
sume one-third less wheat products! day upon which to eliminate pork. 

A continued economy in the use of 
sugar will be nece ssar y until later in 



than we did last year 
Meatless Meal 



Every Day. 



"Have one meatless day (Tuesday) 
in eVery week and one meatless meal 
in every day. Have two porkloss days 
(Tuesday and Saturday) in every 
week." 

'Explanation: Meatless means with- 
out any cattle, hog or sheep products. 
On the other days use mutton and 
lamb in preference to beef or pork. 
Porkless means without pork, bacon, 
ham, lard or pork products fresh or 
preserved. Use fish, poultry and eggs. 
As a nation we eat and waste nearly 
twice as much meat as we need." 

"Make every day a fat saviug day 
(butter, lard, substitutes, etc.)" 

"Explanation: Fry loss less; bake, 
broil, boil or stew food instead. Save 



the year. 



It is imperative that all waste and 
unnecessary consumption of till sorts 
of foodstuffs should be rigidly elimi- 
nated. 

Tbe maintenance of the health and 
strength of our own people is vitally 
necessary at this time, and there 
should be no dangerous restriction of 
the food supply; but the elimination 
of every sort of waste and the yeubstl. 
tution of other commodities of which 
we have more abundant supplies for 
those which we need to save, will in 
no way impair the strength of our 
people. 

Urges Co-operation. 
I, therefore, in the national inter- 
meat drippings; use them and V.ge- f*^S \ h * k Hbeny ° f ca,lin 8 u P° n 
table oils for cooking instead of but- j f ver ^ ° JaI American to take fully to 
ter. Butter has food values vital to ' h . eart , ?t f*S esUon8 which are being 
Children, therefor.,, give i. ,o them ! cu ? ,llated ^ the to °* administration 
Use it only on the table. Waste no i T ° f b ^ff ta f that they oe *°»owed. 
soap. It is made from fat. Be careful ' **" ( ' onlldent lhat tn e great body of 
of all fats. We use and waste two and > °Z T??!*Q£*JP°**. *°. ,oy " 
a half times as much fat as we need. 
— "Mak e every — d*y- 



<By K. J. T. EKB1LAW. CnlvsrslW of 
Illinois.) 

Though the character usually as- 
cribed to swine Is one which gives lit- 
tle or no consideration to cleanliness, 
still the pig Is an animal which will 
respond very quickly, Indeed, to clean 
surroundings. The building should 
be so built that its construction will 
permit of cleaning and thorough dis- 
infecting. This means smooth walls 
and noons, for .If crevices exist they 
ore only harbors for dirt and vermin. 
On account of the anatomical con- 
struction of the pig, his breathing, eat- 
ing and drinking is done close to tbe 
ground, and close to a thousand 
sources of infection. This makes it 
all the more necessary that his living 
quarters be cleaned as often and as 
thoroughly as possible. 




Style, Action and Finish. 

three kinds — wagon horses, chunks 
and drafters. All of these horses are 
derived from draft breeds. 

Wagon horses weigh from 1,250 to 
1.500 pounds, and show style, action, 
finish and substance to a marked de- 
gree. Chunks weigh from 1,360 to 
1,600 pounds Hnd are compactly built, 
about two inches less ln height than 
wagon horses of equal weight. They 
must show quality, action and espe- 
cially substance, to sell welL Draft- 
ers weigh from l.GOO pounds up. The 
bigger the better if they show the 
other qualities ami tire snappy 
movers. 



PREVENTING RUNTS IN FALL 



Problem Confronta Every Producer of 

Pork — Scrappers Should Be 

With Big Pigs. 



Preventing runts ln fall litters of 
pigs Is a problem that confronta every 



producer of pork. Establishing pens 
for pigs of the same size, not more 
than twenty to the pen, ts necessary. 
Pronounced scrappers should be 
penned with larger pigs. It Is also de- 
sirable that all tbe pigs should be eat- 
ing well at weaning time. Grain, one 
pounds of middlings to ten pounds of 
milk, placed in a trough easily reached, 
will teach them to eat naturally. More 
grain Is added until the weaning time 
ration Is one pound middlings to three 
pounds milk. At 4wo weeks after 



ally in co-eperatlon with the food ad- 
, ministration will Bt,re.ngtiien their ef- 
1 forts and will take it as a part of their 



burden in this period of national serv- 
ive to see that the above suggestions 
are observed throughout the land. 

WOOUROW WILSON. 
The White Mouse, 
1& January, 1918. 



SUMMARY OF RULES. 



day." 

"Explanation: Use less sugar; less 
sweet drinks and candy containing 
sugar should be u id in war time. A3 
a nation we have used twice as much 
sugar as we need." 
t "Use fruits, vegetables and potatoes 
abundantly ' 

"Explanation: These, foods are 

healthful and plentiful and at the same — 

time partly take the place or other I Rul '-» have been formulated by the 
foods which we must save. Itaise all ' Apartment t effoct the necessary 
you can for home use." j saving of foods. Some of these rules 

"Use milk wisely." j rpply to manufacturers, wholesalers 

"Explanation: Use all of the milk; and retailers under license regulations 
waste uo part of It. The children must \ ^bers "PPly to the housewife and 
nse whole milk Use sour and skim Btated briefly cover tbe following 
milk in cooking aud for cottage I'O'nts: The consumer Ik requested to 
cheese." . , V urchaso ** «qual amount of sola* 

"Hoarding food. Auy one buying i otner cereal for all wheat Hour , mr - 
«nd holding a larger supply of food <*ased. They may be used separately 
now than in peace time, except food (;r ml "d as the housewife chooses 
canned, dried or preserved in the ''"rchase f Victory bread I 




KEEP CLOSE TRACK OF HOGS 

Make Sure That Animals Are Not Af- 
flicted With Lice— Oilers Are 
Quite Common. 

It Is well to keep close track of the 
hogs and make sure that they are not 
afflicted with lice. Lice are blood- 
sucking parasites. They lower the vi- 
tality of hogs, not only by sucking the 
blood but by continual irritation which 
gives the hog uo rest. When hogs 
have many lice they will not do well 
and will lose flesh, becoming much 
weakened In condition aud thus more 
susceptible to disease. ^"*" 

There are various methods of get- 
ting rid of lice. Hog oilers are quite 
common, though the crude oil which 
is used ln them may he applied to the 
hog directly with a brush. The bogs 
may be dipped two or three times at 
intervals of about ten days, using some 
reliable coal-tar dip or disinfectant. 
This gives good results. 



GRAIN RATION FOR LAMBS 



No Runts in This Bunch. 

j wenniug they .should be eating about 

( five pouuds for each hundred of live 

1 weight, when, if pasture Is good, no 

' further Increase is necessary. The 

animals should be kept free from lice 

and worms. If this practice is followed 

few or uo runts will occur. 



WINTER ATTENTION TO RAMS 



Young Animal Just Beginning to Eat 

Should Be Given Corn, Oats, Oil 

Meal and Bran. 

A good grain ration for lambs just 
beginning to eat is ground corn, 1 
part ; crushed oats, 1 part ; linseed 
oil inen l, 1 part; and wheat bran. 
parts. Wheat bran Is very essential 
in this ration, and the shepherd should 
always see that it is present. A grain 
ration consisting of 2 pounds of wheat 
bran, 1 pound of oats (crushed oats lw»- 
lng preferred), 1 pound of finely 
ground cornmeal, and one-half pound 
of oil menl has proved to be an excel- 
lent grain ration for yoTihg^umbs. It 
has also been found that a grain mix- 
ture of oil meal aud cornmeal has giv- 
en better results than a mixture of 
cottonseed meal and cornmeul. 



FOR THE WHEATLESS DAY. 

For breakfast we will have any kind 
of cereals except those containing 
wheat, for exam- 
ple, the old-fash- 
ioned oat meal 
will go well for 
this menl, provided 
It Is well cooked, 
then for luncheon 
and dinner hot 
corn bread, rice 
muffins, steamed 
brown bread, bran bread, rye, and bar- 
ley will give us a variety from which 
to choose. When preparing the 
breakfast oatmeal a larger quantity 
will cook nearly as soon, and the left- 
over amount may be put Into a well- 
greased pan, and when cold cut ln neat 
slices. This if fried nicely ln sweet 
fat makes a most wholessmo hot &.*b 
which will take the place of meat. We 
all know the value of cornmeal mush, 
both as a cereal and as a breakfast 
dish sliced and fried. Nuts, fruit, or 
bits of meat added to the hot mush 
make it more palatable and more nour- 
ishing. 

In most of the breads a little wheat 
flour Is essential to keep the materials 
together and when yeast is used to 
provide the gluten to hold In the gases 
so that the bread will rise. 

Rice Muffins.— Sift together half a 
cupful of cornmeal, a cupful of pastry, 
a half teaspoonful of salt, four tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, two ta- 
blespoonfuls of sugar. Beat one egg 
and one egg yolk* add a *aW cupful of 
milk, and when well mixed with the 
dry Ingredients, add three tablespoon- 
fuls of melted shortening with a cup- 
ful of boiled rice. Bake in well but- 
tered muffin pans 25 minutes. The 
rice should be boiled tender and be 
quite moist. 

When serving rice In various ways 
enre should be taken to see that it Is 
well done, as It Is unwholesome un- 
der done. 

■ran Bread.— Scald a cupful of milk, 
add two tablespoonfuls of shortening, 
a half teaspoonful of salt and three 
tablespoonfuls of molasses. When 
lukewarm add a cake of yeast soft- 
ened ln & quarter of a cupful of water, 
add one cupful of entire wheat flour 
and bran to make a soft dough. Do 
not knead. Let stand well covered un- 
til light, cut down and turn into a 
brendpan. When doubled In bulk, bake 
one hour. 

^eKircnm 
owe 

No 'form ox service Is drudgery, If 
the one who serves Is free. All forms 
of service, mental, or physical, arc 
drudgery If the one who serves Is in 
a "state of bondage." 

He who has conferred a kindness 
should be silent, he who has received 
one should speak of it. 






PRUNING NEWLY SET TREES' 

Work Should Be Done Just as Soon' 
After Planting as Possible- 
Roots Are Not Strong. 

(By J. a. MOORH, Wisconsin Agricultural 1 
Experiment Station.) 

Probably more trees die the flretj 
season after planting from lack oC 
proper top-pruning than from any oth-1 
er one cause. Scarcely, if ever, does' 
the grower prune his trees too severe-; 
Iy at setting; in almost all cases notj 
enough is removed. 

Top-pruning should be done just aja 
soon after planting as possible, «u*J 
every day it is neglected lessens thef 1 
chances for the tree to withstand the' 
adverse conditions. When a tree is' 
dug, not only is tfm root system rauUl- 
ated, but by for the greater portion iaj 
removed. Often fonr-flfths of the root 
area Is left ln the nursery. It is evi- 
dent that If the top of the tree fee 



I 




•t':h'l' Si 








GOOD THINGS FOR STATE OCCA- 
SIONS. 



Celery to be used for the table, 
should be thoroughly chilled. By add- 
iug a slice of lemon or a 
dash of vinegar to the 
water, the celery Is kept 
white nnd made crisp. 

Apple and Cheese 
Salad.— Wipe and pare 
apples and scoop out 24 
balls, using a French 
vegetable cutter. Mar- 
inate with French dressing and chill 
thoroughly. Mash a cream cheese, and 
add a tablespoonful of chopped pl- 
mentocs, and three-fourths of a tea- 
spoonful of salt Shape Into 12 balls 
the same sise as the apple balls aud 
roll in finely chopped pnrsley. Ar- 
range n bod of crisp heart leaves of 
lettuce, sprinkle over It the celery cut 




Low-Pruned Tree. 

not reduced, this mutilated and great* 
ly lessened root area will be called 
upon to supply as much top with 5 
moisture ■ nnd~"ftrod" materials as the; 
entire root system did previously* 
Since tbe roots cannot do this, tn» 
fruit trees should be heavily top- 
pruned immediately after planting. 



If Expected to Be Kept In Good, Vigor- ROUGHAGE FOR IDLE HORSES 
oue Condition He Must Be Given 



BEST RETURNS FROM MANURE? 

In Orchard Planted en Slope Fall Ap4 
plication Must Be Wasteful- 
Much Washed Away. 

Will manure give the best returns) 
when applied in the fall? Evidenttx 
no single answer can be given that 
will fit all conditions, says Uounrri 
Gentleman. In an orchard planted on 
a steep slope, the fall application o% 
manure nwst necessarily be wasteful^ 
for a large portion of It will be wash**! 
down to lower levels by the wlnte£ 
rains. In an orchard located on aj 
sandy, open soil the fall application} 
of manure will also be wasteful: irj 
this case the soluble nitrogen nnd pot» 
ash compounds are easily washed Intof 
the deeper soil layers and are apt tqj 
be curried off tn the drainage waters^ 
Such soils should receive applications) 
of readily available plant-food at th^ 
beginning of the growing season. 04 
the other hand, level or slightly rollf 
Ing day soils, or clay loam soils should! 
allow an economical utilization of 
manure when the latter is applied In 
the fall. To be sure, the indirect eft 
feet of the immure will be lost to some 
extent, because the fermentation will 
occur at the surface Instead of with- 
in the soil ; nevertheless, the Improved 
ment In the tilth and water-holding 
power of the land under the manure, 
mulch should offset this advantage. . 



PROTECT YOUR FRUIT TREES 



There Are Some Kinds of Mixture^ 

That Keep Rabbits Away— Any 

Covering Is Good. 

There ure n number of ways to pro* 
rect trees from rabbits. Some of these 



also protect against mice, and some do 



Some Grain. 



s strongly 
is helping to defeat the Food ur * ed - T bi» will consiPt of a mini- 
Administration in its attempt to »e ' : mum P r flv * Per cent of cereal other 
eura a just division of food and the as* ,L,a *beat for the Drastat, th»- per- 
tMbllsument of fair prices The food ' cenU S* t0 *>«' hiertajed until on Feb- 
hoarder is working against the oo 

»on good and even agalnat the v«rj P"W»»Wf1 of twenty per cent. On ' flocks of the WesL This ratkm does 
safety of the country. Hoarding f<,o U « wheatless days and wheatl«si meals I not product* fat. but doea keep np the 



Expert of North Dakota Station 

Makes Suggestions on Feeding 

During Winter Season. 



Mr. Peters of the North Dakota ex- 
periment station mukes the following 
suggestions on wintering the horse. 



During the summer months, when 
the rum Is allowed to run on pasture, 
he does not need grain; but In the 
winter, if you expect to keep him in 
good, vigorous condition, be most be 

supplied with grain at least a month | Tbe work horse that has been proper 

before the breeding Benson. j ly cared for and fed In the Hammer 

A mixture of two parts oat* audi can bo wintered, when not at work, on 

one port bran has given aamsually| audi roughage as oats straw, good hay 

rusry ;4th it will contain a minimum : good results In some of th* larger- and corn fodder. In addition to the 

I of twenty ix r ...mi rtm\ n..cLi nt iii* w«st. This ration deee uliove It may lie necessary to glra four 

to five pouuds of grain dully ptsr nul- 



la hoauhuld* Is twib stdflHli and un ,|B * «•» br«-ad «»a>le < ntlroly ot other ce> j vigor of Hie rum. 



The Government l. 



With* U ur,,.,l 



— .. ,. „,,,.,, Kur |oca , s , tua „ onI i It ,„ lujpoasjbb" to suggest tsst r*> 
•uanly of Us feopla' , w ° , ' v ' "» *ro necessary, apphV a. t amount M ».. ft I. <or this can only 

'stiou. should be mads to elate food be dvtfi-uiliicd by watebiat »•»• ••»«"»» 



•tniAiuiUtrallcae 



aud studylug his conditional 



mul lu order to maintain them In good 
flesh. Idle horana should be turned 
out f«r exorcise tv«ry day In winter 
sweep f on the few stormy winter days 
that occur during this seotOsV 



In fine strips nn Inch and a half ln 

length, Arrang e. t in* ball s n n t he leuUiot^There^nris sonTe" kmaTorpato 
tuco and serve with French dress- 
ing. 

Turnip Cones. — Wnsh nnd pare tur- 
nips and cut in cone or cube shape, us- 
ing a vegetable cutter; there should 
be throe cupfuls. Put them Into a cas- 
serole, add u half teaspoonful ot 
salt, one and a half teaspoonfuls of 
sugar, one-fourth of a cupful of sweet 
fat, a dash of pepper, and a half cup- 
ful of boiling water. Cover and boll 
until the turnips ure tender, about an 
hour and a half. 

Brown Glblet Gravy.— Pour off all the 
liquid in the pan in -which the tur- 
key has been roasted. From the 
liquid skim off six tablespoonfuls of 
fat and return it to the roasting pan. 
add tilx tublespoonfuls of flour and 
stir until well blended, then cook until 
well browned. Pour on gradually, 
while stirring constantly, three cup- 
fuls of stock. If you have none, use 
any vegetable water that vegetables 
have been cooked ln, such as potato 
water, stir and cook until smooth, sea- 
son nnd strain. To obtain stock cov- 
er the giblets, neck and wing lips with 
five cupfuls of cold water and let sim- 
mer until reduced to three cupfuls. 
The gtblots are finely chopped and 
added te the gravy. 



and washes' that will repel rabbits? 
but they are soon washed off by rain* 
and It Is doubtful if they repel micei 
Any sort of covering that extendi 
high enough und low enough to thq 
trunk will do the work. It remain^ 
for the owner to decide for himself! 
whether he will use cornstalks, pupc-i*, 
rage, wire screen. or some other munu<j 
factured covering as a protector. It 
Is doubtful whether a man saves any* 
thing by using some such make-shift 
as cornstalks or hay. The extra time 
required to put It. on as It must be' 
done to be effective, probably more 
than makes up the cost of a munn* 
fnctured protector, which cau be ad- 
justed so much more quickly. t 

PASTURE SWINE IN ORCHARD 



Pennsylvania Expert 8aya it Will Be 

Safe If Few Important Points 

Are Watched. 



The PenusylYania stale zoologist! 
Prof. n. II. Surface, says that It will 
be safe to posture bogs In the young 
orchard If you will watch two or three 
Important i»olnt». One l« to be sure 
that tbe hogs do not rub ugaliist the 
trees too hard In the process of 
scratching thtMiisolvcw. Another point 
Ai to watch that hog* do not roof oe* 
4he roots of young trass. 



r 1 



■M 



mm* 



mmmmm ^ k 



RUSSIAN SELF-RESTRAINT. 

laiter :iiid more detailed accounts of 
recent 'hrfpponuutjs In Be^sii sro of a 
nature tluit should greatly advance the 
popular estimate of the character of 

the people <>r tluit countr y. Their 
course throughout a wonderful revolu- 
tion has hecu notable for the single 
quality of self-restraint shown, says 
Omaha Bee. The overthrow of a 
despotic government \vas accomplished 
with comparatively little disorder or 
violence and a provisional government 
has been set into ruuulng order lu a 
very short time and made fairly oper- 
ative with so little friction that the 
whole affair excites the wonder as well 
as the admiration of-Jhe outsider. It 
la yet too soon to look for absolute pre- 
cision In governmental function ; In- 
deed, this Is hardly to be expected of 
a democracy, but the Russians have 
Hstoiilshcd the world with the use al- 
ready made of their freedom. Self- 
control is the first essential to success 
In popular government ami this quality 
the Russian people have shown in an 
astonishing degree. Replacement of 
the old order by the new in Russia 
la one of the most remarkable events 
In history, and, no matter what its de- 
velopment may lead to, its inception 
will long stand as a bright spot in 
man's record. 



PLEfl f FflRMERSlSMflDE 

President (Sends Special Message to Big Meeting at Urbana, 

Illinois— Causes' of the War Reviewed and Importance 

of Agricultural Interests Is Emphasized. 

Believes the Farmers Will Respond Without Word or Appeal, 

Because They Understand the Needs and Opportunities 

of This Great Hour — Message Has Made Good 

Impression Throughout the Country. 



i. 



. Twcuty-five. yuung women, members 
of a business college class In wireless 
telegraphy, called on Count Marconi 
-at the Rltz Carlton hotel In New York 
city, and were delighted wheu he told 
them he thought girls would make 
even better wireless operators than 
boys. "Judging from the trouble I 
have with telephone boys compared 
with the ease with which I oau be 
heard "by "telephone girls, I should say 
that girls have a keener sense of hear- 
ing than-beyar " h e bu I i L — 'Qf-cowsa, 
girls are apt to be excitable, and that 
would be a serious drawback, and then 
too they would have to learn not to 
talk about the messages they handled." 
As far as the last observation is con- 
cerned, there is no more reason for dis- 
trusting girls than boys. In spite of 
the old joke about women talking, they 
can keep secrets when they choose, 
and they do choose when secrets come 
to them iu the way of'buslness. 



of the Federal Reserve banking 
system 'and of the farm loan 
banking system to see to it that 
the farmers obtain credit, both 
short terra and long term to 
which they are entitled nof.. only, 
but which it is imperatively nee 
t ssary «$hould be extended to 
them if the present tasks of the 
country are to be adequately per 
formed. Both by direct purchase 
of nitrates and by the establish- 
ment of plants to produce ni- 
trates the government is doing 
its utmost to assist in the prob- 
lem of fertilization. The Depart- 
ment of Agriculture and other 
agencies are actively assisting 
the- farmers to locate, safeguaro 
and secure at cost an adequate 
supply of sound seed. The depart 
ment 'has $2,500,000 available for 
this purpose now and haB asked 
Congress for $6,000,000 more. - 
THE LABOR PROBLEM. 
"The labor problem is one of 
great difficulty, and some of the 
best alencles of the nation are 
addressing themselves to the 
task of solving it, so far as it 
Is possible to solve it. Farmers 
have not been exempted fromth'.' 
draft. I know that they would 
not wish to be. i take it for 
granted they would pot wish to 
be put in a class by themselves 
in this respect. But the at- 
tention of the War Department 
-leli_y ; .Oiu lor I UT1] I ha s , "bn o n vurv s eriou s ly, c e nt e r e d 



The official history of the entry of 
the Pitted States Into the European 

war brings out nothing material that 
is absolutely new. Nevertheless. It 
will have the good effect of clearing 
the views of thousands who have beeu 
misled by erroneous statements and 
out-and-out falsehoods of various 
kinds that have found their way Into 
circulation through sensational and 
Unreliable publications in various parts 
of the country. 



A London government board has 
found that all the anthras-infected 
shaving brushes have come from one 
factory, which used horsehair from 
China that hnd not been subjected to 
processes for destroying possible 
germs. A consignment of shaving 
brushes from Jupan was found to be 
similarly infected. The discovery will 
lead to new precautious. 



Washington, Jan. 31 —To th~ far 
mora of the United Stages Presi- 
dent Wilson today sent u mesf 
aage in which he called attention 
to the country's need of their as- 
sistance during the coming year 
in winning ths war. The message 
was sent through the Farmers- 
Conference being held at the. Un- 
iversity of Illinois at Urbana. 

The message was delivered by 
President James, of the University 
of Illinois, in the absence of 
Secretary of Agriculture Houston, 
who was to hava represented the 
President. The President had ex- 
pected to attend but indisposition 
mads it impossible and he dele- 
gated Mr. Houston who was pre- 
vented from participating by the 
tie up in transportation facilities. 
The President's message said : 
"I am very sorry indeed that 1 
cannot be present in person at 
the Urbana conference. I should 
like to enjoy the benefit of th» 
inspiration and exchange of coun- 
sel which I know I should ob- 
tain, but in the circumstances it 
has seemed impossible for me to 
be present and, therefore? I car 
only send you n very earnest mes 
sag™ expressing my Int e re s t and 
the thoughts which such a con- 
ference must bring t . . eminently 
into every mind. 

WHAT WAR DEMANDS. 

"I -weed not 

sure you realize as keeuly as 1 
do, that we are as a nation in 

tho proannef* n f a great lask. 

which demands supreme sacrifice 
and endeavor of every one of us. 
We can give everything that is 
needed with the greater willing- 
ness and even satisfaction because 
the object of the war in which we 
are engaged is the greatest that 
free men have ever undertaken. It 
is to prevent the life ol t£io 
world from being determined ana 
the fortunes of men everywhere 
affected by small groups of mil- 
itary masters who seek their own 
interest and the selfish dominion 
throughout the world of the gov- 
ernments they unhappily for the 
moment control. You will not need 
to be convinced that it was nec- 
essary for us as a free people 
to tajca part in this war. It had 
raised its evil hand against us. 
ECONOMIC LIFE. 

"Tha rulers of Germany had 
sought to exercise their power in 
such a way as to shut off their 
economic life, so far as ou 1 inter- 
course with Europe was concern- 
ed, and to confine our people) j they 
within tho Western- Hemisphere, four 
whih.-. they accomp l ished purp o s es j un n 

"Which — wonW — have permanently 

impaired and impeded every pro- 
cess of our national lite and 



muniriea which are to be served, 
but it is serving mankind jyJweK 
as the* farmer, and everything in 
those time* of War takes off t 
rigid aspect of duty. 

." I will not appeal to you to 
continue and renew and increase 
your efforts. I do not hrlieve 
"that it is necessary to ilo so. 
I believe that you will do it 
without word or appeal from me, 
because vou understand as v.eli 
as I do "the needs and opportun 
it it's of this great hour when the 
fortunes of mankind everywhere 
seem about to be determined an f 
when America has the greatest 
opportunity she* has ever had to 
] make good her own freedom and 
I in making it good to lend a 
helping hand to men struggling 
for their freedom everywhere. 
You remember that it, was far- 
mers from whom cam" the first 
shots at Lexington, that set 
aflame the revolution that made 
America free. I hope and be- 
lieve that the farmers of Amer- 
ica will willingly and conspicu- 
ously stand by to win this war 
also. 

"The toil, the intelligence, th-» 
energy, the self-sacrifice and de- 
votion of the farmers of A m e ri ca , 
will, I believe, bring to a 
triumphant conclusion this great 
last war for the emancipation of 
men from the control of arbitrary 
government and the selfishness o' 
class legislation and control, and 
then, when the end had come, we 
may look each other in the face 
and be glad that we are Ameri- 
cans and have had the privilege 
to play such a prirt." 



IN THE SUNNY SflUTH 

An Interesting Letter From Mrs. 

P. G. Croper Who is Making 

a Tour of the South. 



St. Petersburg. Fla , Jan 2o, l!H7. 
My mother, Mrs. E V Gaines 
and myself are having a most 
delighti'ut tour of Florida. At 
present we arc located in St. 

having taken > he jthem 
o Tampa, crossing | j own 



Petersburg, 
water trip 
Tampa Bay 
konoket, a 
hours' lid-: 
hours in 
wonderful 



m th * new boat, Po- the 
very enjoyable Pwo 
•: spending about four 
the citv, the parks, the 
Sulphu 



Work a Pfeasur*. 

Bdw.ird Kas*on t -who. resides 1 
on the old James JarreU farm 
down ou Woolpsir creek, fiiit upon 
a novel but practical and rapid 
way oi' gftling hi« J odder, ..opt °/ 
the field during the past „' week. 
His corn ;fiehl ocebpies a steep 
hillaid?, his barn standing fti th* 
bottom at the foot of thV bilL 
Mr. Easton went- into* ■ i "*he •'■• field, 
cut the shocks oi fiKkte* " loos** 
from the ground, using..- .a hoe- 
for the purpose. ..He* then tied 
securely and started : .i h?m 
the hilL headed .towards- 



Springs, vi-w- 



in 
rte 



ing th" oriental looking Tallsbor- 
ough river, the Spanish settle- 
ment and the Magnificent Tampa 
Bay Hotel, returning by water, 
enjoying a gorgeous sunset ana 
twilight, arriving at the hotel for 
six o'clock dinner the same day. 
To our notion th" Ixiat trip 
across Boga C?ga Bay to Pass-a- 
Gille, the little island seven miles 
long, off the coast in <!nlf ol 
Mexico, was the most pnjoyaMe 
trip we have taken. 

very little while wo spent in 

Lazotte Fishing Camp, which 

an ideal Denvery. Spanish 

know. However the waters of 

great gulf was the most in- 

vlsw to us, and the most 

day was spent '"gathering 



upon the task of interfering with 
tho labor of th" farm s as little. 
a-s -possible, and undel 1 the new 
draft regulations I beUene that 
the farmers of the country will 
find that their supply of labor 
is very much less seriously drawn 
upon than it was under the firs' 
and initial draft, made before 
wr> had had our present full ex- 
perience in these perplexing mat* 
tars. The supply of labor in all 
Industries is a matter we mus j 
look to and ar looking to with ! 
diligent care. 

SPLENDID RESPONSE. 

'■And let am say that the stim- j 
illation of the agencies I have j 
enumerated Iras been responded j 
to by the farmers in splendid j 
fashion.. 1 dare say that you ar;' | 
a war- that the farmers of this 
country are as efficient as any 
other farmers in the world. They 
do not produce more per acre 
than the farmers in Europe. It is 
not necessary that they should I 
do so. 

''It would perhaps be bad econ ' 



Would Be a Great Saving. 

The Recorder has for several 
years advocated the teaching of 
the public schools through the 
months of July and August, and 
this winter has demonstrated the 
correctness of its position. A 
school day js only six hours- 
three hours before and three 
1 hours afternoon, which would be 
j much more pleasant and less harm 
— f«l to — the pupil through the 



j months of July and August than 
j through the mo nths o; December 
and January, when the chUd has 
to "Scramble through the snow 
and mud to reach the school 
bouse to say nothing about the 
zero weather he "has to encoun- 
ter. During the months of July 
and August the pupil could come 
and go in comfort, the warm weath 
er of which it seems the educa- 
tional department has become so 
afraid not being near so dreadful 
as that to which the pupil is 
subjected ifi midwinter. 



A 
The 
was 
vou 
th" 
viting 
o» th? 



shore," ana 
we proudly 



Band, 

enjoy 

inci- 

locat- 
W O 

-conn— 
home 



omv 



Vienna admits that the Austrian 
troops retreated before the Russians 
lu Galicia, but wants it distinctly un- 
derstood that they dM not hurry any 
to speak of. or act In any way to give 
the impression that they were fright- 
ened. In short, Vienna wonts us to 
know that this was another of those 
"strategic retirements." 



Considering all the talk that has 
been expended on the subject of saving 
food, the a mo u n t o f -feed- th a t i f g o ing | Vhe -Test— oi 
to waste at the present time is im- 
pressive. It cannot be saved by words 
The only thing which will achieve re 
suits Is work. 



hu\e put the fortunes of America 
at the mercy of the imperial gov 
eminent of Germany. This was no 
threat. It has become a reality 

"Thrnr hand of violence had been 
laid upon our own people and our 
own property in flagrant viola- 
tions not only of justice, but of 
the* well recognized and long- 
standing covenants of interna- 
tional law and treaty. 

FIGHT FOR LIBERTY. 

"We are fighting therefore as 
truly for the liberty and self- 
government of the United States 
as if the War of Our own revolu- 
tion had to be .fought over again 
and every man in every business! 
in the United States must know 
by this time that his whole fu- 
ture fortune lies in the balance. 
Our national life and our whole 
ecpnomic development will pass 
under the sinister influence of 
foreign control if we do not **W« 
I need not ask you to pledge your 
lives and fortunes with those of 
t he natio n to — tbe 



end. 



The man who expects to throw a 
surprise into the world must get up 
something with more thrills than u 
one-reel revolution somewhere, fot 
we've almost outgrown being sur- 
prised. 



With Mr. Nicholas Romauofl"* for- 
tuuo down to n pittance o? $4,OtM.0O0, 
kind-lieurted persons will hope Rus- 
sia masters the high cost of living be- 
fore next winter. 



Speaking of the besl fruit container. 
did the agricultural department ex- 
perts ever Investigate the capacity of 
a Cnndl boy in green apple UmoT 



Hut If teaching wurllme lllcuen 
economics tiy telephone beeuineit sue 
MMfal and popular, will that Improve 
(he ti-Ii phono suxvlca? 



If that threatened udauutf of 
cloihc-* without |'o. ' .* rou»«* t» p*nn 
pray, what »r.. mm to to with our 
fctmJal 



accomplishment of that grea 
CRISIS AT HAND. 

"You will realize, as I think 
statesmen on both sid«s of tho I 
water realize, that the culminat- ; 
ing crisis of the struggle has come 
and that th;> achievements of this 
year on the one side of the other j 
must determine the issue. It has 
turned out that the forces that 
fight for freedom, the freedom of 
men all over the world as well as 
our own. depend upon us in an 
extraordinary and unexpected de- 
gree for sustenance, for the sup- 
ply of the materials by which men 
are to live and to fight, and it 
will b:> our glory when the war is 
over that we have supplied those 
materials and eupplied them 
abundantly, and it will be ail 
the more glory because- in supply 
ing thmi we have made our su- 
preme effort and sacrifice. 

IN FIELD OF AGRICULTURE. 

'•in the field or agriculture we 
have agencies and iist rumental- 
iii-M( fortunately, "ttch as no 
other government In tb> vvorla 
can show. riu> Department of Ag 
rleultmti is undauntedly Lhegrea 1 
est practical and scientific ug ' "'- 
I oral orgnnimtlMMi m .l.«- a >Ud. 

• • • Th<> bunking i« .' ■' '«• "> "' 

last two or th h"» 

given the I. Mm the 

great |rndtil>U< cm pit id »>! the 
country and tt bus become 
dut j both 



for . them to attempt it. But 

do produce by two three OT 

times more per man. per 

of later and capital, than 

I ths f.irm'ei'S OT any European cou.i 

J try. They are more alert and use 

iinor* labor-saving tievi"es than 

i any other farmers in the world. 

'• And their response to the de- 

| mands oi the presont emergency 

I has been in every way remark-. 

! able. 

"Last spring thei ■ planting e\- 
I ceeded by 12,000,1)00 acres the lar# 
|est planting of any previous year, 
! and the yields from the crops 
were record-breaking yields, in 
the fall of 1917 a wheat acreage of 
12,170,000 was planted, which was 
1,000,06a larger than for any pre- 
ceding year, 3,000,000 greater than 
the next largest, and 7,000,000 
greater than the preceding five- 
year average. 

Exceed Achievements. 
"But I ought to say to you 
that u is not only necessary that 
these achievements should be. re- i 
peated, but that they should be ' 
exceeded. I know what this ad- 
vice involves. It involves not on- 
ly labor but sacrifice, the pains- 
taking (application of every bit 
of scientific knowledge and ev- 
-er^r — t e stod — pract i ce ■ that i s , pra et^ 



One of Owen's Tricks. 

Owen Smith, who resides two 
miles out on the Belle view pike, 
was coming to Burlington in his 
two horse sled last Wednesday, 
when his team began running, one 
of the animals showing great 
carelessness in the use of its 
hind feet. The sled struck the 
bridge just west of town, tore 
tho tongue out of the sled and 
the team ran up in town, the 
only .damage being the wrecking 
of a few panels of George Blyth's 
wire fence at the roadside and 
heading the bannister of the 
bridge. When Mr, Smith saw that 
the sl ed was bound to strike thci 
bridge, instead of jumping he lay 
down in the box bed hehadlan 
the sled, which action on his 
part k°pt him from being cata- 
pulted and probably badly hurt. 



shells from thee sea 

a splendid collection 

possess. 

' The trips to the Mi. chell beach, 

the Jungle, Big Bayou, which is 

not far beyond Judge J. M Lass- 

ing's cottage, and many others 

foo numerous to mention, vrexo 

each and everyone appreciated. 

Two wonderful concerts, each 
day, are given in Williams Park 
by* the Scotch Highlanders 
where hundreds gather to 
the music, and the ladies 
dentally to knit. 

Our hotel, Butler Arms, is 
ed two doors from Dr. 
Rou se , — for nn»r4y — of Boo t w 
ty, whose very handsome 

The orange and grape fruit 
groves are "scenes Fit for the 
Gods." We enjoyed the privilege 
of picking the fruit and eating 
to the limit of our capacity, be- 
ing kodacked, surrounded over 
bead and under foot, with fruit. 

W/i leave here next week for 
St. Augustine and other places 
of interest. Not the least enjoy- 
able part of our journeying is the 
delightful people we meet— all so 
good natured ancL jcourteous. 

After all "The Ships that pass 
in the NighC cast the only shades? 
over our lovelv trip through the 
South. 

MRS. P G CROPPER. 



barn where they arrived 
good condition. Wh"n ready to 
scend the hill Mr. Easton would 
ride a shock down, thus com- 
bining the pleasure of coasting 
with th.- work of getting his 
provender out of the field. He 
said h a never before knew 
for what hills were made. 

He Finaly Got Homo. 

A. W Corn, of Bullittsville, went 
to Covington by way of Ludlow 
list Friday, and whde he tarried 
in the eity the waiter from the 
river got over the road, and he 
tried to get home by the way of 
Flor 'nee and Limaburg, and near 
the latter .own his maehinewent 
into a snow bank and he could 
not get it out on its powerxHeJ 
called Cecil Gaines to bis assist- 
ance, with a horse, when the 
machine was hauled to a place of 
shelter, after which be took Mr. 
Gaines' horse and sled and marfo 
his wav on home. 



Satisfied With Tho Price. 

Jesse Louden, oi Locust Grove 
neighborhood, was in Burlington 
last Friday delivering 15 cent to- 
bacco to the local buyers. He 
sold his tobacco early but was 
very well satisfied with the price 
received, as his crop was not aa 
good in quality as he most al- 
ways produces-. Owing to a fail- 
ure in his plant beds he did not 
get as much tobaeeo p lanted last 
year as he intended to cultivate, 
Imt he will be verv apt to g«*- 
there this year with a f nil ucre>-' 
age. 




LOOK TO YOUR SEED CORN. 



Food Regulations. 

At present fuel is the all ab- 
sorbing topic. The next four 
months will be the critical period 
for food. Following the regula- 
tions of the Food Administration 
now will prevent a food situation 
like the fuel situation. Th<? Food 
Administration has requested ad- 
herence to the following program : 
1. Wheatless Monday. 
Wheatless Wednesday 
One wheatless meal each day 
Meatless Tuesday. 
Porkless Saturday 
One meatless meal each week 
Save sugar every day 
8. Save fats every day 
During this week new home 
cards will b? prepared setting 
forth the regulations in detail. 



2. 
3. 
4. 

5. 
6. 
7. 



icable. It means the utmost 
economy, even to the point j 
where the punch comes. 

"It means the kind of consider- 
ation and self-sacrifice which is j 
involved in the field of battle i 
itself, where the object always 
looms greater than the individual. 
And yet the government will help 
in every way that it is possible. 
The impression which prevails in 
some quarters, that while the 
government has sought to fix the 
prices of foodstuffs, it has not 
sought to fix oth ,v r prices, which 
determine the expenses of the 
farmer, is a mistaken one. As a 
matter of fact, the government has 
actively and successfully relugat- 
ed the prices of many funda- 
mental materials underlying all 
the industries of the country and 
has regulated them not Only for 
the» purchases of the government 
but also for the purchase of the 
general public, and I have every 
reason to believe that the Con* 
grees will extend tho powers ol 
the government in this important 
ami even essential matter, so 
that the tendency to profiteering 
is Showing itmdf in too manv 
quartern may Ik? affectively cheek 

Tool) PRICBt. 

"|i ; the prices ol f< 

ttufN tiv gotcrnmont ha4 *in- 
I 

trmer .»i much in 
mind h 



a^te, 
week in 



Suffragette in Town 

Mrs. B|evoridge, suffm 
si>ent several days List 
Burlington, soliciting signatures Ho 
jiotitions requesting Senators) 
James and Beckham to vote for 
tho amendment to the national 
constitution providing for woman 
suffrage. The petitions were sign 
ed by a few, while many refus- 
al. It is evident that woman 
suffrage is not fir in the future, 
but those who believe that wo- 
man's condition will not be im- 
proved by giving her the ballot 
refused to lend any encourage- 
ment to the move. 

Comfortably Fixed. 

Alonxo Beomon, of Limaburg 
neighborhood, was a caller at this 
otfiee oik* afternoon the past 
week. Mr Beomon is one of the 
most comfortably fixed young 
farmers In this county, and be- 
ing surrounded by an industrious 
and happy family has no reason, 
n-.d or imaginary, for wanting to 
make * change in \ife. 

prof. A M Yeulev, of Florence, 
m,ih iu uurUagton, U»t Thursday, 
lie is a member o. Un> eouuty 
drilt board and wnft looking af- 
UtNiiiiMMi in which the bourn 
is now fugugej, preaariug for 
making the next seWtlnn of 
i*i to ( nop Taylm 



J. II Stevens, of the Idlewild 
neighborhood, arrived home last 
Saturdav from Lexington, where 
he attended ihe State Corn Show. 
He took three premiums on the 
corn he had entered, to-wit : 

First, an automatic gate, on best 
tan ears yellow coxn. 

First, $5 rug, on best single ear 
yellow corn. Thi6 contest was lim 
ited to the Eastern Division of 
the State. 

First, 1,000 pound fertilizer, on 
best ear corn, regardless of color, 
the whole Stare competing. 

Mr. Glore. the noted Indiana 
corn producer was present and 
delivered a very interesting ad- 
dress on the production of corn 
and banking. Mr Glore laid par- 
ticular stress on the seed corn 
condition in this country, saying 
he had none because of a failure 
in germination. 

Mr. Stephens says that a seed 
corn shortage confronts the far- 
mers, and they should bezin at 
once to test out their seed. The 
condition is not local, as per- 
sons from every quarter of the 
country complain of defective ger 
mi nation and are at a loss as 
to where to obtain seed upon 
which they can depend. This; 
condition was emphasized by ev- 
ery speaker at the coin show- 
last week. 

Mr. Stephens and his brothers' 
are recognized as among the best 
corn producers in Nort her n Ken- 

been 



$10 a Day for His Labor. 

J. W. Sebree, of Locust Grove 
neighborhood, was ,in Burlington, 
Friday, delivering his tobacco to 
Conner & Yelton and investing 
some (of the proceeds of his . 
crop in grass seed and wire fence;— 
Mr. Sebree says bis tobacco paid 
him at least ten dollars for each, 
days work he did in it; *~ 

John Maursr, of Belleview, being 
unable to get a supply of groc- 
eries from the house with which 
he deals in Cincinnati, had to draw 
on W. L Kirkpatfick, last week, 
for a load to tide him over. 
Belleview neighborhood has been 
dangerously short on supplies 
once or twice this winter. At one^ 
time the supply of coal oil was' 
exhausted at the stores and many 
homes were without lights, the.! 
people going to bed early and 
rising late, - depending ou nal 
for light. 




Owing to the deep snow drifts 
at many points in the public 
roads in this county, travel ha* 
been compelled, to detour, going; 
through fields where the land 
owners kindly threw open their 
fences, in some instances cutting 
wires, to accommodate the tra& 
fie. At many plaos in cuts 
snow in said to be 10 or 12 
deep. 

Last week's Grant County News* 
carried the official sta^ementa 
showing the financial condition of 
Grant county at the close of lest 
year. It required 32 columns to 
accommodate the statements. The 
amount of every item of expendi- 
ture was thereby made public for 
the benefit of the taxpayers. 



] 




lucky, and he says 
testing the corn 
lected for seed, and 
as follows : 

Their white corn, 
which are large and 



he has 
they had 
the result 



is 



the 
fine 



ears of 
looking. 



total failure as to germina- 



thia 
few- 
test 
at 
last 

on 

the 



seed eoru 

watte your 

will not 



But the one case of smallpox 
was reported from the road camp 
down on Mudlick creek. In these 
latter days it seems that this 
disease, which many years ago 
was considered the worst to han- 
dle, can now be controlled with- 
much trouble and is general- 
ly in light form. 



is a 
tion. 

Their yellow corn matured bet- 
ter and about one half of the 
test has germinated, but on much 
of it the sprouts are small ana 
show very little vitality. 

Th> RECORDER has repeated- 
ly ' warned the farmers of 
condition during the past 
months, and urged that they 
their seed co-n at once, and 
the corn show in Lexington 
week, tho best auvhori'ies 
corn in the county, took 
same view of the situation, show 
ing that it is high time that the 
soed corn problem be given 
ten Hon. Look to you 
Test it at once. Don' 
time planting seed thi 
germinate. 



It Depends on tho Kaiser. 

Judge Gaines and w< D Crap* 

per have invented an it :uhmen 
which they pine.-. I Hi thin hunt- 
ers and by which III en- 
ubb-d to • tart theli lira In th 
ning wHhout loeOt 

m They 
will appl) 
as < 
does not « ortio out winner 



The Ground Hog saw his shad- 
ow at an early hour last Satur- 
day morning, and hastened back 
to his winter quarters there to 
remain six weeks longer to escape" 
the rigors of the weather <<*: 
prevail during that time. 



T. Z Roberts, bachelor, ana 
about the oldest inhabitant on 
Middle creek, is recovering from 
a severe case of measles, but lie. 
has not returned to a second' 
childhood by any m?ans. 



The News says there will be 
enough business for at least a 
two weeks term of the Grant couo 
ty circuit court which began last 

Monday. 



James A. Duncan, of Idlewiiu 
neighborhood, came in last Fri- 
day to spend a few days with 
his brother, Dr. E W. Duncan uw 
wife. 

M 

Edgar Riley miysth.it hm p ,p- 
erty in Hurlington w.is *oid aiKi 
not noted .is reported in a 
cent taaua of the Kecorder, 

Kkutert ami Mledn (or 
w«re ui demand laat week, 
the \oung people had * grai 
time the country over. 






■MB 



mmmmmmmmm 



wmmmmmi 












i 






THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7, 1918. 



X 



BOOW1 COUNTY RICOKD1I 



* 



^WALTON DEPARTMENT.* 



D. B 



WALLACE, Manager. 

Hand your news items to Mr. J). B. Wallace at the Walton Equita 

ble Bank and Trust Co.'s building. He is also authorized to re- 

cieve subscriptions and collect other accounts. 



FORTY YEARS AGO TODAY 



The Recorder of Febru- 
ary 7th, 1878 



W. X. Sleet, of Atlanta, Georgia, 
■pent last week here with his 
mother Mrs. Napoleon Rich 

Mrs. Chae. H Young of Folsom, I _, "~ 

Grant county, spent the p:«st week jltem* laken From the Issue of 
here with friends. 

Rev. and Mrs. D. E. Bedinger; 
and daughter Miss Heater left last i 
week for Orlando, Fla., to spend | 
the balance of the winter. The Waterloo merchant, R. L 

Hon. (K E, Carroll, who repre- Aylor, is seriously ill 
sented Boone county in the Ken-! •••• 

tucky Legislature, is very 111 at] Hogs are scarce and the price 
jjti» homo in Kenton countv, near Y or y low. $3.75 to $4.15 
Walton. 

Judge J. Q T >mlin and John L 



What's the Use of 
Carrying a Complete 

Stock Unless Folks 
Know What You've 
Got? . — 

Advertise! 



A log fell on Benj. Wain>cott, 
of Frances ville. and broke his 



Vest spent last Monday at Will- £ 
iamstown attending the circuit i ■• 
court in which thev have several «. ... .„ t.f*!i. 
important cases. ' . J h ' X $ .^hT'/ 1 *** wa6 tlik( ^ 

Mrs. Wm Ransler went to Cincin ! ^ to b? oS * * "^ 

nati, Sunday, to take treatment at >••• 

a hospital for some minor ailment, Eaq . John A Keodall is (^ _ 

R. Wood Carpenter has a posi- •*** 

was snowed out 



tion with a livestock commission 
firm at the UnJ w - Stpek Yards, 
Cincinnati and began the dis- 
charge of hi9 duties last week 



and 



January 
February was %r.^. 
/•* •» 

In some roads the snow is drift- ' 



.... h w «. ...* ""«^» »«■"«■ nc^R. -». ouiuc luaus me anowjuciuli- 

Thos. Griffin spent last .Satur- T d 6 ° hadly as to make travel- 
day at Danville where he waftatj in ? laborious and almost danger- 
one time a student in the Ken- nus ' 
tucky school for the deaf, and! , *»•• 

was offered the position of fore- 1 Gabriel T. (iaincs fell and broke- 
man in the shoe factory. I "i 8 l p g again List Saturday. 

Ellen, the little daughter of m .,„, ~ . •♦*♦, , , 
Thos. W Marshall, liad her collar! ./ a>1 °' 9 sboin < colored, died Sun 
* . i._„i — i_-* m j._ ay morning oi lin'lamation of th*» 



bone broken last Tuesday even- 
ing while coasting. Doctor J F. 
Daugherty gave the necessary sur 
gical attention to the little* suf- 
ferer. 

"Earl Robinson, son of Frank F. 
Robinson of Richwood, who is sec- 
ond lieutenant in the field ar.iS- 



liowels. 



» * » » 



County court refused to probate 
the will oi' Samuel Weldon. 

Ill •! «• J * * ** 

Phil Watson, colored, wife mur- 
derer was hung in Willow Run 
"ottom, Covington, last Friday 



lery, writes Ms father that he has I Who. asked oS thi gSfJ/uZl 
arrived safely in France and is ' hid alytttag' %? say^gave "ut 

thf outtook" V P * with iterance 'to tL follSwinf? "Fart 

tne outlook u . elli vain world . my Lo ' rd Jeau8 

xt- u , Duri i. dlpd at hi8 home n«»r Christ has called ' me and I'm 
.Nicholson, hast Weanesday, after jgwine home. There is a mighty 
a short illness from pneumonia. ! heap of rascals left behind who' 
Me leaves a wife and six chil-i will follow mo through the tor- 
dren. the youngest being only 14 ments oi' hell." 



PlatUburg.-Thive foxes have 
been caught during the present 



days old. The funeral took place 
Friady at Independence. 

Arrangements are being made to ■ 
have a Farmers' Institute at Wal- 1 snow.— Candidates show up here i 
iSSi Tuesday ' Fcb ' 19 when the ["^asionally .-Prof Snyder and' 
_ oest Practical talent in the State WiJupils art- rehearsing for an 1 
Agricultural Department will l>e . exhibition.— Most of the tobacco I 
here to discuss various topics. A I raisjed in this neighborhood lias- 1 
full program will be issued next , **** delivered to a Covington! 
week - I dealer at pnees ranging from $2 

W. T Voters of Butler, Pendle- to * 5 P* 1 " m pounds, 
ton county, spent last week here 
in the interest of the income tax 



department, instructing the pub-, 
lie how to make the returns in 



Petersburg.-The cooper shops 
were closed Last week, throwing 
•20 men out of work.— Mrs J E 



*«. nuw iu nxase tne returns in ,n m wurs.— airs <j. 

a proper manner. He was kept I £ernll aR convalescing. — W r 
busy all of the time ,«* . ,„;,„ i Gordon is building- a ointmm 



R 



was 



Gordon is building a 'cistern' for 



here, and rendered valuable sorl' th . e to11 ho »se on 
vice. | pike. 

^ M 3 ? «3d.-Russoll Baker and Miss' 
X,mme Gray, were married at New 
port, Jan. 8th The groom is a 
aon of Dick Baker, cogored, of 

kilo vo. T w.l. 3 ' 



the Belleview 



FkH-enee.— Florence elected the 
following council at the annual 
town election: Doctor J. Corcv. 
president; Dr. Sayre, Frank Vav- 
iier, Jacob Shotts and Asa Me- 
cham. L Swetman, treasurer 



Beaver Lick, and owns one half 
of the farm and he and his bride f 

are making their home there. !^d inU t Z etman " trea8 «rer 

They lare excellent people ana i't?, t ohp Bncknw " aseessor.-Hen^ 

have many friends. P ,na j ry Ingram came to town and told 

Mrs. J C Grenoe and two ,-hi. • VOL.™ 7 * h ^ ^ aB a candidate for 

Frank C t'uli-v „/• 5 C"" 5 ' cut ""« ™<i ditching an av- 

?m* in a Faw^ g b?fore a 'T^'ve^ n i?° bu f hels «f corn last 
IT. S Supreme CoTt The Mh ?«h^». " S ^" Bd and &»od.- Jonas 
weather caused him to w? coki Core's residence is ^bout corn- 
return MmTtoAri™,^ ^ Pleted.-Leonard Clore is prepar- 

is balmy father ^ "*** " i IX Jr bu i" D v a ,ar ^ b *<* «£ 

r , .' . ", tr ' i intending to build a brick r*»si- 

BeSov ^\ Griff i th and J o^ C i aencc.-gev. Beasl^, of Eminence 
tbSr^Sit Jlf^L' Sunday from ^engaged in a protracted ^t- 
cOTSdirth*. t0 M l8s f? sl PPi- They , **%. here.-Mrs Walker ha* begun 
3m . tLS ♦ g . LlCUl Ural oPPortu- ■ f ive months school.-J wlite 

Sacter Vc ' thev°. n t 'TH a * Ty \t£ r* n '^P 10 ^ to con^ct 
ers there w« * l ay tho farm ~ L¥ G ^ ai i? e Btore another yearA 
firnuno '^J. \"° ^T 1 ^* ^il^"^ T '. G s re ^ died last Thurs- 
O, EostW S« Succe8fl,ful ^nse. R «ay from injuries received when 
on «»."•' ° acc °mpanted them a horse fell on him -Rumor ha sit 
tt iSL S. r BUined lon ?er to vis- that Dr. J M. Grant «SSnnlate B 
it some portions of Alabama. | moving back to BellevieT - A 
Rankin R. Rf . vil ^ - Frankfort ' u" e fl Jf®T ^Jooging to Dr. OU1 
was here last Tuesday in (he^'n % 1 ™a dkd of eatfng tobacco.-Jas 
terest of the National Bank o7 ? nyde T' 0i " Pittsburg, w as in 
Commerce of New York f> t ^ »5i ,0WB ,ast Saturday, 
mg its representative in Kv aln£ ' " — ^~ 

saffi^'-t^; ' || i r ♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

?£ fift S ^ | : HEBRON. : 

tv bov an ° M RoonPtoun^ Most every one here has been to 

'• *ee the river. 



Bid6 are bvdng received on wool by 
National Red Cross and when the 
total supply has been contracted for 
and average price obtained, a price 
will be fixed at which this yarn can 
be supplied. Of course this interest* 
knitters but indirectly as the price 
fixed will he to chapters only. 
* * • • 

The Afghan started by the Burl- 
ington Juniors is progressing nicely. 
Mrs. Caywood, who has charge of 
the primary and intermediate grades 
: w this work was pleasantly surpris- 
ed Wednesday afternoon with stacks 
of well-knit squares. They were 
made solely in the grades. And 
while telling of the Juniors it would 
be hardly fair to omit the High 
School section of this same auxilia- 
ry. Under the supervision of Miss 
Ruth Kelly they are working nearly 
every afternoon, tables have been 
fixed and they aro now making— and 
very eucc«K8fully— the larger pieces 
Of gauze. If other juniors will report 
their work will be recorded gladly. 

* »•• 
Word was received that hereafter 

all gauze, instead of being wrapped 
in muslin squares, will be tied in 
bundles, then packed in paper sacks; 

* a » • 

Finished work received last week: 

Hebron, I) rest pillows. 

Hebron Juniors, 16 rest pillows. 

B. H S., 144 4-inch compresses, % 
fluffed dressings, 13 sponges. 

Burlington. 3 rest pillows, 160 4-in. 
compresses, 49 sponges. 

One knitted wash cloth was turned 
in by a Burlington primary pupil. 
Their other work has not been re 
ported. 

There igjdejpjty. uf k liaki yaen-mrwvj 
120 pounds. A supply of window Hags 
and red crosses came last week. If 
any one wants them' they may bo as- 1 
cured from Mrs. Goodridge. '■ 

Rhode Island Red Cockerels, $1.50 

,,,.„.„, *••.*„ , | a piece. Phone Beaver 208. 

PhJnt»£i rep '^ Bo ? np T <,J "'»y bmchl Mrs. L. M. ROUSE. 
Chapter for month ending January j 

3\ 1817 : I *♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Balace on hand January 1st $1596 97 ' ♦ A 

By Burlington Junior mem- !♦ 

membership dues 2 00 ♦ 

By Burlington donation 50 1 ♦ 

By Waton, entertainm't fund . 40 00 1 ♦ 



Seeds that Grow 

is what; you want when you buy ; seeds that have 
high purity and germination tests. 

You can get weed seeds for nothing. We know 
Seeds, and we have the best connections in the seed 
producing sections of the country, which enables 
us to go direct to the section where grown, and get 
the purest and best to be had. ' 

Every bag of Seed we send out is tagged as to 
purity and germination according to the Kentucky 
PURE FOOD LAW, and you will always find our 
Seeds above the standard. \A(rite prices and sam- 
ples and be convinced. We are now the largest 
ir^ Northern Kentucky. 



United State* Food Administration License No. G 1770. 



f ccde>*™ilunKi& 



GR0CERf£S. FLOUR SEEDS. MED/C/NES 
/9-2/P /KEST. 78-20W.7msr 



Covington, Kentucky. 



Phones South 335 and 336 



WANTED— Man to tend tobacco I, 
in river bottom land. Some \ 
corn land furnished, house and , \ 
garden free, and cow pasture. U 
Address M. -Br~Rle^-"T,andTrig ) [ ' 
Ky. tf. 

FOR SALE. 



By Walton donation 800|* 

By Walton membership dues . 2 00 ; ♦ 
By Burlington membership (♦ 

dues. " 4 00 

By Union membership dues tf 00 



WANTED FARM HAND 

Married man to work bv 
the month. Steady work and 

fjood wages. Inquire at Par- 
or Grove Farm. 
C. LISTON HEMPFLINCx, 
Taylorsport, Ky. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



For Sale. 



Total v 5759 47 

ExpeneitureH— 

To E. K. Kelly, general mer- Cue acre land with frame house 

cliandise J » 70 ! and two outbuildings. } miles from 

To C. Scott Chamern, lloral j pike; the property known as the Ca- 

m Piece 10 00 1 8 <>n school house situated on the pub- 

To Maxwoches Son Co. 1 bale I He road fading from the Burlington 

gauze l.'iS 00 ! & Belleview pike beginning near 

To Ij. C. Scothorn, yarn li in | Mrs. Kliza Walton's to East Bend 

To American Red Cross, mem- road. House cost $450 when material 

bership dues tf 00 1 and labor were about half cost of 



a bank e^smcL 




Total 



Balance on hand Feby. 1st. $T>84 61 
• • • • 

Sent in from Florence— 413 4-inch 
eomprosseB, 79 9-inch compresses, 
9 pairs socks, 1 rest pillow 
X$ 



present time. All bids must be sent 
$174 86 i under seal to J. C. Gordon. Superin- 
tendent Schools. Right to reject 
any and all bids reserved. This 
property is suitable for home for 
smali family or tenant house. 

Terms-1-3 cash, 1-8 six months. 
1-3 in twelve months, deferred pay- 



1 ne Chapter has been able to place 1 •"* *" "»""» T o 
an order for guze and yarn at a bet- I ments to Dfi Hr l fi K»l rate of interest 
ter price than in the past, and has with loin reined to secure deferred 

. .pii..i..,/i .. ........ t- :.„..#. 1. ..-_.. • navmAiitM 



loo^fJ?!™ of tobacco' at Walton ' in Fx £\ is « et tfngto be very scarce 
wo» teaf warehouse la.it Wednea- " tlus "^ghborhood. 
t& B StS^ U i d 7 Wf>1R l J», bestof : .nazel Walton, oi Dayton, O., Is 
aatisSrv fT**?**** generally | ■ , J tto ! relative * <'°o frienda here. 
S? verv y imi theselle,s ' "»«*•' -^ rank Hosaman, who haa been 

^SUTmS^SSSn Th * ^, Ck 8l i nCP laftt ^Ptembei ha S ^n- 
r - , avera Sea about 20 pfoyedl greatly, 



«pont taS ftSdS be[» wSh° U hls nuTcfc, '& Mai,liU9 Qoodrid^e 
fannly. The house had a eju h TV '' ^,'"" k ° r K°°*° of 

of tobacco waa sold. The murk, t m 

dition 

^W^^^'i , ^ t; "-P ,, »'^ ™Z?i m ' ! '" , ' Mi ^ Aylor haV^ 

Krta"sss^~^^ »f. w L iu.iThir — 

«h to «Lu.y ilu, report that 



ordered a quaatity of these materials. 
All auxiliaries are urgently request- 
ed to send in any money they have in 
their treasury, as the order will cost 
around $900, and we only have 
$584 61 in the Chapter treasury. 

The "Red Cross asks it members 
and friends to assist in making gar- 
ments for Belgium and French ref- 
ugees. 

Among those desolate people, ren- 
dered homeless by the enemy, are 
many babies in dire need of clothing. 

These infant's layettes can be 
made In the home of scraps old ma- 
terials and bits of new. 

We earnestly hope that many wil- 
ling hands will offer to help us in 
thia work. 

For particulars, materials, pat- 
terns, etc., enquire of your Red Cross 
Auxiliary, or we will send instruc- 
tions direct. 

MRS. B. C. GAINES, 

Vice-Chairman. 



A man said to us, "I did not know a Bank could be 
of so much benefit to me until I opened an account 
with you and became acquainted with your service ; 
you keep a confidential record of all my transactions, 
pay the taxes and 3 percent, interest on my deposits, 
sell me Liberty Bonds and Thrift Stamps, lend me 
money when I need it, take a daily paper for my 
benefit, and assist me in dozens of otfier ways with 
my private business which I did not know a bank 
could do. I will carry a bank account." 

We appreciate the compliment of this friend and our 
service is free to all. The more we serve the better 
we can do it. 

We take an interest in your desire to succeed. • 
Call or write us. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

. Burlington, Kentucky. 

B Bank with Ot«- One-Third of a Million Dollar* A««et.. 

LW. L. B. ROUSE, Pres. A. B. RENAKER, Cash;er. ^ 



O 



Beaaja Room aon Frank 



is gradually getting h#Uw and litiu^T? Vi mso «°» ^rank 

> tobacco is i n better 3SC t£ ^ u K,£™5 d & U ****i ,ho ^ 

to put on tale, ihoiwh « IU u„F h,, ' r °J Mr - aa<» Mrs Al- 

percentago ,>f th'« Z? uJt T V, . alu >"~ »nd Missle Avlor h™^ 



tokweo than Ow^^ZT <K 

eo* eowWsoed and yrt U h, . ," un\w££d V/ ' ° ny "'- '-POrtthat 

:warrkid, U*r it Imfio PluU 

1 MAY&fiid uvrv. 



thia RAMon. 

A UtU* noy~o7 
<»ioj*4, mat ««• 
Jl cm da last 1 



Bov. fR, H; Carter, of Peters-, 
burg, was in Burlington Monday 
and Tuesday, offering fifty cents 
a bushel for coal put in Ms bin 
in Petersburg. He remained over 
Monday sight in Burlington to 

fet warm once more, and walked 
ome Tuesday that he might re- 
tain as long as possible tho 
warmth secured while in town. 



BIRTHS.— Born to Oaraett Huey 
and wife, of Middleburg, this 
State, a girl.— Bom to Chas, Uuer- 
ney and wife, of Erlanger, a girl. 
—Born to H. W, Shearer and wife, 
of Newport, on the 1st imst, a 
girl. 4 






I The Tri-State Knows How To Handle Frozen Cream ($ 

J The Tri-State ha. everything arranged to handle your cream; the be.t I 

i machinery money will buy and experienced people who are trained in our jl 
( ) way. of carefulne.. and accuracy, each one of them re.pon.ible fot a cer- ( 
I 1 ta.n definite duty. No .lip.hod method, go at the Tri-State, .y.tem and 3 
1 j pain.tmking caref ulne*. safeguard your intere.t*. 

j j For the part 8 yean, whether flood or .torm, heat or cold, over 25,000 

cream patron, have found The Tri-State Re.pon.ible. 

55 Cents 

per pound for Butter Fat week beginning Feb. 4, 19181 
SHIP YOUR CREAM DIRECT TO 

The Tri-State Butter Co. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

UNITED STATES FOOD ADMINISTRATION 
License No. G-18152' 
If you do not have can. write u. for Free Trial cans. 
Remember Station Buyer, are commiwion men who take a toll of 2c 
pea pound or more from your cream. Ship your own cream and be inde^ 
pendent. 



The weather, tho fuel, the food 
and the transportation condi- 
tions the paat aix weeks were 
never as bad in this part of the 
country. 



R. O Ryte, one of tho thrifty 
farmeri in toe Waterloo neighbor- 
hood, waa transacting buHinem in 
Burlington last Tuesday. 

Because >f tho deep nnow Qbamt 
wom*n wear rubber I****, which 
ahowa good judgment. 



For BaW-Cow aad eaewd o«U 
Robert llcOlaaaon, RurUiafton R. 



payments. 

Done by order Board 6f Education 
Booup Co., Jan. 8th. 1918. 

J. C. GORDON, Chairman. 

CHAS. KELLY, S ecretary. 

Public Sale! 

1 will Hell at my residence just 
north of Burlington, Ky., on 

Saturday, Feb. 9, 1918 

The following property: 
Bed Room Suite*, Single Beds, 
WashBtande, Couches, Settee, Book 
Case, Hatrack, Carpets, Nlolin. Din- 
ing, Kitchen and other work Tables, 
H*atin3and Laundry Stoves. Kitch- 
en Safe, Churn, Milk Coolers, 1-horse 
Carriage, Farm Wagon, Mowing 
Machine and Plows-, Wire Fencing, 
Fruit Jars, Dishes, Etc. 

Terms— Sums of $5.00 and under, 
cash ; over that amount a Credit of 
six months will bo given, purchaser 
to give note with good security pay- 
able at Boone County Deposit Bank, 
Burlington, Ky. 

MONETTE REV ILL. 
G. W. Sand ford. Auctioneer. 
Sale to begin at. 12 o'clock. p>/a M A .. _. 

-———-—— FOR SALE. 

Administrator's Notice. 

All persons indebted to the estate p, lrfl u raii t ar „ n it i * 
of jjharlea E. Clore, deceased, must rure bred Jeri "-'y ^«H calves from good producing dams and sired 

by a bull whose dam made 38 lbs. milk, 2:47 lbs. butter in 24 hours 
with second calf ; gramldam made 19 lbs butter in 7 days and milk- 
ed over 12,000 lbs. in one year ; also one good calf by above bull 
out of a cow with a record of 45 lb. of 7 per cent milk in 24 hours 
Apply to R. B. HUEY & SON, Burlington, Ky. 



come forward and settle said indebtr 
edness, and those having claims 
against said estate must presedl 
them to the undersigued proven as 
by law required in such eases. 

JOHN W. CLORE, Admr. 
o) the estate of Charles B. Clore. 



FOR SALE. 

Gasoline Range and Coal Range. 
Both in lirat-olass condition, nnd 
cheap. Enquire of 

MRS. ALBERT RIGGS, 

feb7'4t Krlangej, Ky. 

For Bale.— Lot nice apples H 
D. Souther, Burlington K. D I, 
Phone 187. 

Lo.t-Tu-Hklay morning an the 
street in Bu.Uoglon a buck akin 
glow lined with .hoop polt Fln- 
ctor return to J. I" Duncan ami 
KOSttV* nryavd. 

For rJaJe— M forty pound about* 
B H AfUr. *ar&rtp» R 0. W ) 



FOR SALE. 

Five room heuao and Imnt and Ave 
other outbuilding" In Walton, Ky., 
on Verona road. 

JAMES CROSS, 
ODichl Walton. Ky. 

FOR SALE. 

An aged horn., will woigh about 
1400 puunda, in tine condition, p#rf- 
«.i|y wife for woiiisd and ohildren 
i.» drlrv, good wnrknr. 

Mr». Monatta lUiviil, 

Hurllngton, Ky. 



"Burlington'! 

Haying received many request H/rom 
parties wanting roe to «dl, heir pro,. 
1 hav« speolal arrangonmnta to tak^ 
oareof that teritory; send ma your 
rilaoriptlon of laud and number of 
acres, prions, uumbur or houses and 
burue, atu. No aalfls n<» pay 
csntifaold. ' ■ r ' %v 

C B. POWERS, Salman 

Equita We Bk.JJld(r . Walton, K i 
Take Tour County >ap«v' * 



SJftJl.._ 



warn 



m 



mm 



mmmm 



BOONB COUNTY 



RBCOKDBB 



THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7. 1*IB. 



t 



H «leeh'9 JSews 



Just nine people carae to court 
41^ last Monday. 

•v f 

Edgar Berkshire shipped a truck 
load of hogs to market Tuesday. 

Wheel vehicles indulged in zero 
chimes again last Monday morn- 
ing- 



#, 



• 



Year after year the scarcity of 
labor becomes a worse handicap 
to the farmer. 



WHAT OTHERS THINK 
OF "OUR ARTHUR" 



LOST LAST BATTLE. ! 'FARMERS INSTITUTE. 



..._„.♦ _ u The farmers of Burlington ana 
John L. buihvan, rormer Heavy : aur ioundiiig country should make 

Champion Expired In | preparations to at tend tho two 

ml, m days Parmera Meeting to be held 

Washington Correspondent of Massachusetts. , under the auap ices of the High 

., -." c . t . « ! School at Burlington High School 

the Times-Star Throws Bou- John L SulUvan , The W g building, Wednesday and Thurs- 

quets at Our Popular Cong- fallow ^asaeid beyond the great day of the 3rd week in February 



r ess man. 



divide? So said the wires of 
Saturday— John L. had gone out 



At this meeting the farmers of 
Boon© county will have brought 



Mrs. R. B, Huey has gone to 
Middleburg to visit her son Har- 
nett and wife. 



Ex-Sheriff W. D. Cropper had 
only six delinquent tax listst to 
bell last Monday. 



To keep in the middle of the 
road has been tho desire • of all 
travelers tho past monith or so. 



The snow this winter hat* beeu 
the savious of the small grain 
which yet has the March winds 
io contend with. 



"Two of tho local trucks had ! 
their troubles last week, because 
of* the destruction of bearings.— 
Kelly's and Huey's. 

Mrs. Maud Fowler, of Cincinna- 
ti, was the guest of her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs B. B. Hume, of the 
Boone House, the past week. 




peacefully at his home near Ab- to their doors some of the best} 
ington, Mass-his home upon the men that the State Afiords to 
little farm where he had lived of talk with them about 
recent years 



If you will sand sample? of your 
seed corn to the Boone Co High 
School, Burlington, it will be 
tested for you free of charge. 

Remember the sale of Mrs. Mo- 
nette Revill next Saturday. She 
has two or three very haudsome 
BOts of Walnut furniture to sell. 



This h\s been one of the best 
winters in history for staying at 
home, but not so good for pro- 
viding fuel and looking after live- 
stock. 



C. C Carroll, of Kenton 
ty, was appointed administrator 
of the estate of Miss Mary Gro- 
gan, deceased, by the Boone coun 
ty court last Monday. 



(By Gus J. Karger | 
Coming a little near home now 



There never was but one John 
L. Sullivan, and there will never 
be another. He was the idol of 
the sporting world through his 
long career of glory, and after 
he had laid down his laurels, he 
remained the idol .of them all. A 
few months and John, would have 
been 60 years of age — but had he 
lived on and on till he topped the, 
century mark, the world of sport- 
dom would never have forgotten 
him, would never have chosen his 
successor. He was tho ope great 
and unequaled champion of cham- 
pions, tho man who stamped his 
mighty personality upon the 
fighting game forever — John Law- 
re-nee Sullivan, best of warriors, 
and a great, grim, rugged char* 
! acter, whose like Is seldom dupli- 
, cated. 

John L. was born October 15th, 
'. 1858, in Boston, and, when twen- 
! ty years of age— Just 40 years'ago 
I —sprang into the limelight by his 
I speed, His hitting power, his tig- 
erish determination. His early 
! fights around Boston made him 
recognized as a coming marvel 



we reach Boone county, Ky., 18 j and when he once gained the 
miles from Cincinnati as the Old | chance to face the champions of 
Crow flies. Boone county is in 



the Sixth Congressional District;, 
and Burlington is not big enough 
to receive honorable or any other 
kind of mention in the highly ex* 
citing volume issued by the Cen- 
sus bureau which contains the 
names of Kentucky cities, of "2,500 
population or over." 

It is only a village, but fame 



those earlier days, he mowed them 
as a strong man mows down 
sedge. 

In • 1882, fighting under the 
fierce London rules, bare-knuekle 
and on the turf, he defeated 
Paddy Ryan, the acknowledged 
champion, and from that time on, 
through teg years of glory, John 
L. Sullivan was a meteoric mar- 



and history will give it high place I vel, and a name to conjure by. 
_aa__the_._ birth_and abiding place J "Sully" asked no "setups " and 
of Arthur B. Rouse, one of the he "framed" no fakes. All he ask- 



really useful members of Congress 
even though he does not make 
coun-.j muc b noise about it. But when 
it comes to grabbing a fourth- 
elass poBtoffice. or establishing a 
new rural route, or. taking care 
of the interests of his conslitaents 



W. W and Manlius Goodridge 
bought the store in Hebron which 
l>elonged to the estate of C. E 
Clore, deceased, and was sold at 
public sale last Saturday. 

SALESMEN WANTED to solicit 
orders for lubricating oils, greas- 
es and paints. Salary or Commis- 
sion. Address THE HARVEY OIL 
COMPANY, Cleveland, Ohio. 



The car load of coal that was 
ordered last week for Burlington, 
landed in Lexington. Another car 
load has been ordered and should 
be at Erlanger in a few days. 

Tho Farmers Mutual Fire Insur- 
unee Company transacted its bus- 
iness fto the court house last 
Monday in order to observe the 
fuel order in force on Mondays. 



ed was where he could find a foe 
—he wished no deeper details. His 
men were whipped, nine times out 
of ten, before tho fight began, 
for few in deed were they who 



fe 
Id 



could look across a ring into the 
blazing eyes of John L. Sullivan 
— it doesn't make any difference ! and not know the sinking of the 
whether thev are Democrats or j heart that spells defeat. 
Republicans, although Rouse is a Outside the ring, Sullivan sway- 
Democrat — Arthur B. is right ed the hearts of the people. His 
there. By the way. don't call | faults were many ; he drank, he 



him Arthur; ho doesn't like it 
Just call him A. B 'and let it go 
at that. What education he didn't 
get in Burlington he picked up at 
Hanover college, Indiana, where 
he got his B. S, ; and the Louis- 
ville Law School gave him the 
right to hang out a shingle— 
which he never did. The late D 
Lynn Gooch. congressman from 



rampaged like a wild bull when 
in his cupB — but they loved him, 
for he was a fighter who fought, 
and he was generous to pro- 
fligacy. No man could go the 
pace of Sullivan ancj, last. His 
time came as it must come to 
all the fighting men ,when, heavy 
slow, unwieldly, only 34 years old 
but 100 years experience, he stood 



Col. Carter Graddy and Miss 
Lucille Berkshire, of Petersburg, 
were in Burlington a few hours 
last Monday enroute home, hav- 
ing been away for two weeks. 
Robert Gaines took them on from 
Burlington in his sled. 

Grant (postoffice, this county, 
has a large quantity of mail held 
in the office at Aurora on account 
Of the ice gorge that has been 
occupying the river for several 
days. Grant ought to get its 
mail by tho way of Burlington. 



the Sixth district, caught him i before the lithe and cat-like Cor- 
when he was young and plastic jbett in the ring of New Orleans, 
and made him his private secret When John ran short of money,, 



tary in Washington. When Joe 
Rhinock came in he kept Rouse 
and couldn't have got along with 
out him. And when Rhinock had 
enough of it, Arthur B., the Bur-> 
lington boy, came in to take his 
place. He is now serving his 
fourth term and is regarded as 
one of the best informed and most 
industrious members o; the House. 
In private he sometimes cusses 
out the leaders, but he votes 
with tlvem. His specialty is pos-* 
tal affairs and his 'position on 
Postoffice committee is now 
third, giving promise to a chair* 
manship if the House should 
happen to remain Democratic. 



eagetdy bestowed 



benefits 
upon him 

Late in years, time mellowed Sul 
livan. Becoming absolutely temper 
ate, he also became a temperance 
lecturer, and doubtless in this ca- 
pacity, did a world of g'ood. in 
the evening of his life he mar- 
ried the sweetheart of his youth. 
Only a few monthr, ago she diod 
—and the old champion never re- 
covered from the blow. 

AFTER COCA-COLA. 

Residents of 108 counties in the 
State who use Coca Cola as a 



problems that confronts him today 
and to point out some of the 
most practical business methods to | 
use in meeting the urgent de-j 
mands being made of the far-] 
mers of Kentucky. Every farmer 
should make his plans now to hear 
the men that will be on the pro-, 
gram these two days. 

This meeting is coming at a time 
when little or no farm work will 
bo under wav. Then, too, it is 
right on tho eve or our next 
cropping season. Any farmer, it 
matters little, whether he bo the 
most successful and powerful • in 
all the land, or the most lowly, 
who attends these meetings, can 
obtain information that used, as 
his or her circumstances will per- 
mit, during this coming growing 
season, will make these two days 
the most profitable spent daring 
1918. 

Among the men to speak at 
these meetings will be Prof. Geo 
Roberts, College of Agriculture, 
Lexington, Ky., who is the best 
authority on Soils, their care and 
treatment, in the State, and 
ranks among the best in the 
United States. Another good man 
on the program is Prof. W. D. 
Nichols, who is not only Head of 
the Farm Management Depart- 
ment, College of Cgriculture, but 
ownso ne Of the most profitable 
dairy farms in Kentucky. He has 
also been selected by the U. S> 
Government to assist the farmers 
of Kentucky in securing labor dur 
ing 1918. His discussion will be: 
FARM MANAGEMENT AND THE 
HANDLING OF THE FARM LA- 
BOR PROBLEMS. 

Mr. O G, Nankins, District lead 
er of Boys and Girls Agricultural 
Clubs, will be here to explain the 
work being done, by these clubs 
and their value in training the 
boys and girls of today who are 
Boon to assume greater TOBponsi- 
bilities than those of the far- 
mers And their wives of the 
present time. 

Dairymen should be interested 
in hearing Mr. J E Crider, Dairy 
Specialist for Kentucky. Aside 
from looking after the interests of 
the dairymen in the entire State, 
he owns and operates a dairy of 
200 cows and at present has 200 
acres of alfalfa on his home 
far, He will talk to you on 
ORGANIZATION AND HOW WE 
MAY (MEET THE INCREASED 
COSTS. 

Watch next weeks Recorder for 
other speakers. Ask your neigh- 
bors it they are coming and then 
come yourself. Thes> men will be 
here and it is your duty to use 
them. Come prepared to- profit 
from that which is GOOD and to 
criticize that which is WORTH- 
LESS.y 



The B. ft. Hume Automobile Co., Agents 

23-25-27 E. Fifth St, Covington, Ky. 
Agents for the following Automobiles and Track: 
CHEVROLET, one man top, tire rack, demountable rim, 
a swell ear. No hill it will not climb, have sold 102 and 
have contracted for 125 more. There is not a di ssa t is fi ed 
customer. 

Chevrolet Baby Grand . $ 962. f. o. b. Factory. 
Chevrolet Model 49 $ 6 71 f. o. b. Factory. 

HUPMOBILE 1918 MODLE, 
Price $1425, F. O. B. Factory. 

PREMIER, with electric starter, $2250 f . o. b. Detroit 



REPUBLIC TRUCKS 

Modle 9, 3-4 Tod, * 920. Modle 10, 1 Ton, $1295 Modle, 1 A 91650 
5-ton Trnck $4200 ; -^ 2 Ton Truck, $1985, 3* Ton Truck, $2950. 

f. o. b. 

FREH SERVICE— Hupmobile 30 hours; Chevrolet, 21) hours; Truck 

40 hours. 

All kinds of Auto Repair* don* by the most competent SV&I in Cr>v : ngton- 
A full and complete stock of Auto Accessories. , % j 

B. B. HUME, Agent for Boone County, Burlington, Ky. 



I REMOVAL 



Atlas Auto Top Company 

Now at is East Seventh St., COVINGTON, KY. 
Tops, Seat Covers, Curtains, Ford Seats $4.75 up* 



Write. Phone or Call. 





Phone S. 3837. 



^M^my^^^^My^^^^^^^m^» 



Hiram Long, who resides with 
Mrs. Elizabeth Snyder over on 
tho Florence pike says anyone who 
is in need of fuel can have free 
all the wood they want by send- 
ing to his woods and taking the 
down timber, of which then* is 
an abundance. 

Monday was a bright day but 
about the most disagreeable of the 
winter. Thermometers in the coun 
ty ranged from two to eight bel- 
low zero, and a brisk wind from 
the west droVe the cold through 
a person in a few minutes when 
exposed to it. 




piest associations are with h:i- 
tonia and Senator Ollie James. 



Renewing T. W Finch's subficrip 
tion to the Recorder, his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Frances Griffith, writes : 

"I am sorry I can not send 
you some of our warm sunshine. 
We have had a delightful winter, 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ♦ 

♦ GRANGE HALL. ♦ 

♦ • 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Charles Hedges and wife, of 
Union, spent Sunday at A. H. Se~ 
nour's. 

Miss Edna Arrsmith entertained 
the young folks with a party last 
Saturday night. 

Clyde and Neal Clements spent 
beverage will be denied the pnv- 1 Saturday night with their aunt, 

"•f m : r j Mrs. Grace Clore 

Mrs. Lena Senour spent Tues- 
day with her agents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Mike Holsworth 

A. O Rouse and children and 
Raymond Newman went to see 
th? river last Sunday. 

Miss Eunice Adams spent 



No Advance. 

We have purchased a dealers entire stock of Hardware, 
Leather,... Etc., jghic.h. enables us to take care of your 
wants in repairing of harness at old prices. We also 
have a 60 per cent Neatsfoot Jet Black &4 At% 

Harness Oil, at per gallon ^ I i UU 

New and Second Harness at All Prices. 
It will pay you to visit us and get our prices. 

Thomann Harness Store 

S. 3018 112 Pike St, Covington, Ky. 



se 
:oun 

g 
stronger, will he forced to visit 
j hard drink emporiums to obtain 
! it, if a bill introduced in the 



sev"- 
her 



B 



Tbe 
Woman's Favorite 

Women bear their full share of 
the dairy work. Anything that 
will make their tasks easier de- 
serves a cordial welcome. A 
(Woman can turn 

^A THE NEW 

^ SHARPLES 

SUCTION-KED 

Separator slow- 
ly and yet get 
all the cream. 
Any other 
separator 
will lose cream 
when turned 
below speed. 
You have 
only to tilt a 
pail of milk 
», low supply tank. 
The simple tubular bowl is very 
e.wy to clean* -only three parta. no 
fussy olsrs to w finh. Co.no iu and let 
us show you Low it works. 




into the ler<: 



Senate by Senator L. N Rayburn, • eral days last week with 
of Lewis county, representing the aunt) M rs . Qwen Blankenbeker 
Lewis-Mason district, is enacted C ecil Pressor, one of the selects 1 
*°j.J?2. and meets th<> a PP roval at Camp Tavlor, spent last Sat-! 
°'.^ he ,..,? vern , £\ i . . Jurdav and Sunday with his par-! 

The bill prohibits the sale of , (Mirs ; Mr- aT1( i m^ Qwen Pressor 1 , ! 



9 QUIGLEY C BEEMON, 
« Limaburg, Ky. 



s s a 



D. E. Castleman, 
A TTORME Y AT LAW, 

—Office over — 
Erlanger Deposit Bank, 

Erlanger, - Kentucky. 



though the last few nights have j any drmk ,. beverage containing j 



Those, who claim to have kept a 
correct tab on the weather say 
21 snows fell during the month of 
January, at one time snow felt 
eleven (fays in succession. The j Kindest regards 
12th day of January was the cold- friends." 
est day of the month, the mercury 
being '20 , below in many localities 
tne county. 



been cold with light frosts. We 
have had a dry winte •, which is 
the reason for* it being as warm 
as it has. We need rain badly and 
will probably get our winter when 
we should be having summer. 1 
think I would enjoy a visit to 
Burlington during just such a 
spell as you are now bavin;;. 1 
always enjoyed cold weather 
when 1 was younger— how it 
would be now is hard to tell. 

All are about as usual. Mother 
and father ire in good health. 



In Remembrance. 



to all Inquiring 



in 



Five hundred bushels of shock- 
ed corn, the property of Robert 
Rice, of Belleview, was destroyed 
by the ice gorge on Laughery 1M 
land< where it was produced. Ow- 
ing to sickness in the Jamily the 
corn was allowed to remain on 
the island -longer than it other^ 
wisr> would have been. -v 

If the law confining the sale of 
Cocoa Cola to those who are li- 
censed to sell intoxicating drinks 
is passed by tho Legislature it 
will deprive the local merchants 
of a source of considerable rev- 
enue. It is astonishing the quan 
tity of Coeoa Cola tha'. is con- 
sumed in Burlington. 



any alcohol, except in places reg j 
ularly licensed to sell spirituous, 
vinous and malt liquors, but the! Virginia Kennedv, daughter of 
second section carries a provision | Marv and Leslie Kenmedv, aged 
to prohibit the sale of Coca Cola I io years, (departed this life Jan. 
in' any place in the Common- 26th, 1918, at the home of her 
wealth except in such places as aun t Amanda Kirtlev, where she 
are authorized and which have a has resided since the death of 
license to sell spirituous, vinjous her mother, Mary Kennedy. She 
and malt liquors. Under the pro- always tried to do right and was 
visions of the bill Coca Cola can liked bv everybody. She was al- 
not be sold in any of the local wav s willing to \>bey those in 
option counties in the State, as authoritv. Her greatest desire in 
there is no place within the bor-.'iif e was* to attend the church. 
ders of those counties authoriz-J Her last words to her father 
ed by license to dispense alcohol- 1 were. "Daddv. will you go home 



County Judge P. E, Cuson has 
appointed the following gentlemen 
Supervisors of Tax under the new 
Revenue Law: 
C. Scott Chambers, Walton 
James A. Huey, Union 
Homer H. Grant, Petersburg 
They will meet at the county 
seat the 2nd Monday In March to 
enter open their official duties. 

The law require* that one of 
the Supervisor* be a clUaen of 
the largest town in (he county and 
tv> Mr. Chamber, falls that houor 



Geo. Blvth with his faim ieani ." — „ 

and sled took several Burling- Between on:- and two o'clock 
ton parties to Belleview last Sun Monday night this section of 
day afternoon to see the ice the State was visited bv a small 
gorge in the river there. None, earth quake. The tremor of the 
of the party expected to witness earjfch- waa felt bv manv people. 
a sight so remarkable and aWfe the movement o: bed springs he- 
inspiring. The eold wind that i i n <r very noticeable 
swept iu from the ice field was j us t a f PW minutes after 
so uncomfortable the stay at the o'clock tho editor of the News- 
river side was short, but the; Herald was awakened bv the 
sight will never be forgotten. , ringing of the door bell.' It 
Only one citizen in the Belleview ; an e i ec tric bell, and, like manv 



with me todav?" 



If you observe anything unusual 
about the Recorder this week at- 
tribute it to the fact that Mr. 
P. A Hall has been a proud grand- 
father since the 1st onst., his 
daughter Mrs. H W. Shearer, of 

J Newport, being the mother of the 

e I handsome young lady. 



RILEY & RILEY 

AITORNEYS-AT LAW, 
and REAL, ESTATE. 

Burlington, Ky. 
Edgar C. Riley will be in Burling- 
ton every Monday and Fnday. 



IF YOU WANT A 

CREAM SEPARATOR 

GIVE ME A CALII. 

I handle the United States, a 
first-class Separator. Old Sepa- 
tors taken in trade. 

Thos. Rice. 

Burlington, - Ky. 

sept 28-tf 



FOR SALE 

All kinds of farms In Keutueky, 
Ohio and Indiana. I have all the 
bargains. See me at the Erlanger 
Deposit Bank. Wm. E. BAIRD, 
sep 18 Erlanger. Ky. 



GEO. B. POWERS 

Real Estate Agent, 

Fire and Life Insurance 

WALTON, ICY. 

Bead fur my list of property for suit-. Ulvo 

mo your property U you wnnt to m»ll. 

Commission Low. 

— i. ■■ 



HANDS. ARMS, 
UMK ASLEEP 

And Wat Ron-Down, Weak an J 

Nemos, Says Florida Lady. 

Fire Bottles of Cardm 

Made Her Well 



James Beemon's face was badly 
cut and bruised when he was i 



Farm for Sale. 



bottoms has b^n found who 
claims to have seen the river in 
a like condition once befoi-o, and 
there are many who think he has. 
been dreaming. 



Pneumonia and appendicitis were 
tha cause of the deaths within a 
week at Erlanger of two h inters. 
Mumcfl Henrietta and Elisabeth 
Klggs. Early last week Miss Hen- 
rietta, after a few days' UblOM 
of appendicitis and pneumonia, 
pasaod away at St. EUz'ibeth'N hos- 
pital, Covington. A few days later 
Miss Elizabeth was stricken an I 
■ttrviVM only a few days. Thev 
wore highly ostitem**! in the com- 
munity and active- woikes in tin- 
local Christian church, They "re 
survived by an aged mother, two 
eietnrs and a brother. The«»w««ri* 
burled nt Florenr-e, Philip Talki- 
laletro havinj charge of the fun- 
erals. 



of its kind, the ^button some- 
times sticks in the socket "when 
pressed and , causes a continuous 
rin<5 untU it is released. Thtswae 
the case on this occasion. When 
tho front door was reached no 
one was In sight. After some dif-. 
ficulty, the push button was pull 
ed from its contact wl(h the wire. 
A few minutes later three dis- 
tinct reports were heard as if 
from distant blasts. 

NewB items from other sections 
of the eouuty indicate that the 
noiet* following the shocks was 
even more audible than ut Owen- 
ton. 

At tho town of New Liberty 
the colored population arose mu- 
masat> and were prepared to em- 
bark to other Mceiies, believing 
that th* Oermun* were bombard 
in* the town. 

Ho far we hav* hfaed of no 
dama,-re.-Newi*-HerttK 



thrown from a sled while 
ing a few davs since. 



coast- : 



Mrs. Chaa Kerr is visiting 
parents in Lewis countv. 



her 



Mrs. J. J. Ferris Dead. 

Mrs. J. J. FerriH, whose illness 
was announced last week, died iu 
Jacksonville, Florida The bereav- 
ed family have the sympathy of a 
host of Hoone county friends. 



1'Yoiu 3 o'clock Tuesday until th»i 
same hour Wednesday inomlug, 
there was a rise of about 40 degrees 
In the temperature, which in a nor- 
mal winter would indicate a ooin- 
uletu thaw.uut aud the elearliig the 
ne out of the rivej. 



My farm of 26 acres on tho Lima- 
: burg and Mineola pike, 2 miles from 
: Constance, Boone County, Ky. This 
' farm is in excellent condition, being 
lone of the;best truck farms iu the 
vicinity of Cincinnati on the west. 
No poor land, all iu grass except five 
acres, 3 acres of woodland, pleufy of 
water, good pond, well ami cistern, 
5- room frame house with porches 
back and front, and other necessary 
buildings all In good repair. Posses- 
sion given any Owe. ror price and 
terms address 

JOHN W. Fl 'RI.ONO, 
nov. 8 tf Ludlow, Ky. H. D. s. 



It will take several days at coo- 
tinued warm weather to pat all the 
«nuw out of sight* 



Belleview received mail by the 
way of Btirllugtou, Wtiduwday, be- 
ing the first uisil received at ofltoe 
for more than two weeks. The lee 
at Bellevh-w we* holding noon yes- 
terday with ne indication of mov- 
ing. 



Kathleen, Fla— Mrs. Dallas Prlns, 
of this place, says: "After the birtll 
of my last child... I got very much 
run-down and weakened, so much 
that I could hardly do anything at 
all. I was so awfully nervous that 
I could scarcely endure the least 
noise'. My condition was getting 
worse all the time... 

I knew I must have some relief or 
I would soon be in the bed and in a 
serious condition for I felt so badly 
and was so nervous and weak I could 
hardly live. My husband asked Dr. 
about my taking CarduL He 
said, 'It's a good medicine, sad good 
for that trouble', so he got me 6 bot- 
tles. . .After about the second bottle I 
felt greatly improved. . .before taking 
It my limbs and hands and anna 
would (0 to sleep. After taking It, 
however, this poor circulation disap- 
peared. My strength came back to 
me and I was soon oa the road to 
health. After the use of about 5 bot- 
tles, I could do all my house-work 
and attend to my six children be- 
sides- 

Tea can feel safe fa giving Cants! 
a thorough trial for your troubles It 
con tains so harmful or hablt-foraihhfl 
dross, pot la oasaposed of mlla\ vege- 
table, medicinal lagredteatg wga SO 
bad aft •r-effeets Thousands of wsssos 
aaee veiturtertlr wnttea, tilsssg of 



mm. 



1 



aaaaaaaaaaaai 



pjHU.,1 ii .ii. i jib. m. ii II.IH19 



1,1,1 ' 



mmmmmmmmm^m 



^■■■■■^■■■■^■■■i 



■THURSDAY FEBRUARY 



191*. 






BOONS COUNTY RECORDER 



THE KAISER PENS 

REPLY TO SATAN. 




Daily 
1< tier 



N-vvs. Find 
"W it .en h\ 



Ohcl.i. 

his S.i- 



1'MaJesly. Luctler S.-;t -in, to 

Wilbulm, in which the 

suggested abdicating in 

2 bi th Emperor, has reach- 

deetiiration, and after due 

r^tfon; the tempting bfiitj ji 



you art* up against. You cm dis-J 
coitpt why your proposition to! 
abdicat? in my favor doesin in- 

t nst mi'. IIiiA'i'Vi ,, 'I am It) 
t\\\ Sport, ami I'll Ml you v hit 
I'll d->. I wdll pl.iv \(i,i a ?im • • ! 
Of pitch to See whKhcr yon a'- 1 

dint" trie or 1 thro'*? you out. In 
oithtjr caaf jrou a • • welcome t 
permanent homo with ni'> and I'll 
Show you « hril 61 « tin>e. Thwe's 
j no in>e, in old friend* qu inelii>'.r. 
■ J \^ th re tfucv? 
. ey tnodavil hag been re- Fr dv -nnllv 

The following letter at- WUhetm [mp. (Hi's 
tribti^fd to the KaiSer has been 
inado public i 

j? H'dl, November. 1. lfU7. 
I mpe Lucifer Hotspur Satan— My j CTaTCur aicui d 

Deam.Lncifer: Or shall I call 9iRt cdrntrianlr 

:,ou fiuey. for short? Your note of J — 

rocefjfc date to our imperial hs-ad. An interesting and diahearten- 



Yours. 
X. aLi.kt 



PARTISANSHIP AND 






9£ " 

7 



. date to our imperial bend 
^ ouJMoffer to abdicate the throne 
of Bfcdas in my favor would be 
interfiling were it whnllv sc-r- 
ious, : ; but conditions are ' implied 
that%nakr- it inadvisable that i 
accejs*. 1 d,., ,, u , think roach of 
treh^jna anyhow. Jt is a secondr 
Husx&Btare at best, an I I ivo'iito 
nor Jfer~ to liv there perm i- 



int -ivMirij 
infX phenomenon 
i. in historj ins 
u ir h which Pol. 



ten- fr 
leri- 



' •' 



AsJ a mart >r of fact, I ha\ v 
nwdJ a splendid sta;:/ toward a 
hell ol my owri— tp call if Bot- 
tortd***- Prussia. Il has ill the 
* mridArn imp o\ementH. such as! 1 ' 
tUnfljpjJT hot u.itei'. red fire. ryTr 

open pfiirrthm? and v 1( .iu 
vr. -At tie.'" pia-svni i in,e we are 
getting practically all of the 
business, and when it' comes to 
a master of competiuoo, i is m\ 
opinion that wo would to-ve*nufh 
«' you off the maj>. Jm. 

To-^-be perfectly frank' with foil, 
we na\o considered the advjiabil 
ity of taking ov*r your plant 
abodt the. -Um'i-Jwi»'^riDff'' ! >foiv 
bankruptcy jf YAtf *&V$ ,M msaiii^ 
ex l>en9es_^ilile_w^ -are rnmin -r 
them"away. Everyom' Srv> 1 am 
a much bigger d"\ il than vou 
ever dared to be,> and there" i* 
not a day. go.^ by without mv 
T'Htur.-s *erog / irr the papers. 

YoO may have once thought vou 
were ""a hell of a fellow, but 'vou 
.hav^jujtkin^ o,, m ,j_ Yom- place 
w a-„bacJi. .j.umb»v,..aud \\lu-ji the 
tunc comes we will move in ami 
take peKsfssi'dit-Tr we think it 
worth. While. Il is not usual 
Prussians to jive \va tuns' or apol 
Ogy. \V<- usually do things an* 
leave it to the world :<> explain, 
fiat Rk ' ••' , ..•1>eclnry of 
our ofH-tfjtes f"iehd*hip, sod afso 
because I realize that vou can 

d o n cr th i- ng to f » i-ontill or p c e- 

Vent our action. Abdicate in mv 
favor? -Vl-jby. you poo- old stiff, 
you have nothing to abdicate. You 
couldn't float a bond issue on 
your plant in a million years. Io , 
tlv commercial market it would, 
b> called junk, f 4a. Have a buQch 
of ancient floorwalkers like Ju- 
das, 2fr.ro, Ananias, Caligula, Rich 
ard IJJ^ -and -4'apt EiddL, *nd*the>t 
are reitHy- dri\-rng bustness awnv 



and 
o. ree-nt Amen- • 
I in the iaj>i,iii v v j ■ 
Ro;>Si'\ ett's <ntt- : 
!:>ok upon public eveafs has be- 
I'Cora* copl raclc.i. tew men have 
secured and held, w Ivite in (d- 
' fice, the enthusiastic support of 
' so tarxi and active a section bt 
ih \mtii i" . public as did Col-. ) 
loii.'l Ruusi\ ell as PresiJent. Since j 
he has been out oi office, how- 
.\ei. he has whipped about wit n 
th- noisy, useless and misapplied i 
nrdov of a ship'w ftn fe pell e r out 
its element. The engine con- j 




union oi an enormous 
Ani«-ieau upaujiev: Be- 

i ^locthiofflii jca»{ ,*' tfWsir- 



I tmues to work, but trie rest ol 
j^jth- taiachuigry ha.s become ao 
,.)-„ n I d-t.-rio^ted ^T;,... "''«o«# ' .. ^i 

;mte -to trust the whip in <h»* 
water once more. 

At the time Oi the Republican 
convention at Chicago in l.TJ, the 
-poqitioM ui W»..'^tcxj««v^'l; was 
f.stron* MA'c th* 'cmmHrv. The 
•aWfon* df Mr^'lToof. at 1 -* ihat con- 
vention, brought down upon him 
thr» condemnation of an enormous 
r*rt wf JJid 
4'aas » oehisj 

"man, favoring the candidacy of 
Mr. Taft hefoee' th* convention. ' 
he was accused of bitter person-! 
at partiaauehip. Kveo : oi j those j 
who upheld Mr. Root was the tecbj 
nical legality of his decision s. i 
many— with the exception of the 
vanishing minority supporting Mr. • 
Talt-felt and said that he had, 
railed t.. make u|ejof the power 
Oi hi* poKi-ti-o'i io upKoTcT and ftp- 
th^r Ihe rrsnlts ■■•evidently' d*-si>- f 
forjed l>> the Araeruan people from; 
their vxp"essiofaf : of pt-eference in j 
the primaries. 

The war,, however, has brought 
out th" finest j pyljti ew of Mr 
Root--qu.ditirs that marked him' 
«hi|e in office as one of the 
K-re . ltlBt Sur»i-Hnrie<i of <J^»»1h j |f \ 



$1195 

fcO.B. DETROIT 



The apple always falls to the ground. 

It cannot FALL UP. 

The price of the Maxwell closed cars 
— $1 195-*wa» fixed in accordance with 
another inexorable law. 

For less than $ 1 1 95 it would be im- 
p o as ib le to giv e y e u closed cars combining 
-as the^ are combined in the Maxwell 
—beauty, grace, comfort, efficiency, dur- 
ability, economy and standard equip- 
ment. 

Fo* more than that, on the other 
hand, you could only get larger size or 
fancier furnishings, i 



from tha "'place. Talk "".about the 
Huns! Why, I woukhVr lei Attila 
bring my' shaving water. 

If you had .a feu scouts, lik'e 
Vol Tirpitz or Von Hmdenburg 
you might talk' on a basis of 
equality. They are tho lioys who 
bring home the bacon, and thev 
are fjlling our hell with taleHt-of 
their. owjj._cnea±ion and develop- 
ftp nt Vj S J8.ut.. while ihey are finish- 
ed p*#iproWir»; : of course; X am 
still -th^ boas of the whale works. 
It is my genius and inspiration 
that has made our new hell pos- 
sible. Hell without me would he 
merely a- word. -T "have- made l? 
a torrid reality. You may as 
well , ufKlerstifcd first as last 
that ydu caaiuol Jim j hell with- 
out some of our Prussian effi- 
ciency. In a .competitive race with 
s you would probably btarfg up 



as a second 
pFant. 

Hy reamm of 
friendship, however, 
to recognize your 
throne as one with 
matie relations may 
fed. 1 am sending 
storff as 
authorities 



storage Up I lie 
" of th? 



ore' 
I am 
moth 
which 



former 

willing 

eaten 

diplo- 



be mainLain- 

. Count Bern- 

noy Ami.as.sador with 

to make treaties com 



patible with our mutual ircieeests. 
Under certain circumstances il 
might lie possible to negotiate a 
union between our crown prince 
and your messalina. Thev mi'ht 
mak ",a g*>od team. Thev mav'al 
ao take on Lucretia Rorgia and 
makfe» it a double-hefider. Flow 
would it do for rn.. to hook up 
with one of your •' Catbe.'im*-thisj time 
Medici person for instance? Oi "their 
course, this Would only he for 
th» eamj^aign and subject to can 
oellatton at ray will, Counv Hern- 
etorffMs permitted U, I dk of 
those as well as othnr mal'ers 
and has hLmaelf hinted to moth- 
advisability of an exeban w or 

This, however. "" woulu j government 



rraduai 



be witM the Idea 6f tie 
abaorj.tiou of your hdl bv 
own. I am to be perfectly frank 
With you. You must realiz* 1 my 
own dfiar Lucii'e.-, that vou are 
•getting old. You are not up 1-; 
our modern methods ,,nd when 
you wander around with >our 
apiked tail, people only smile in 
a good-natured way, and murmur. 
"Who th- h<dl is he." or "1 won 
dor fbixX mischief Satan is unto 
now?" 

You ar." all right for running a 
kinderga "ten. but as the boss of 
real. 



tha I niteel Stales has had. Hut 
the passage of time has seemed 
to dim the apprehension of Mr. 
Roosevelt, so that, instead of 
seeking t> strengthen he execu- 
tive 'ill this crisis, bv doefc wha-: 
h»'-'oai#- cwmt* iloubt aiidt mis- 
trust. 

Speaking before the Republican 
<^hiV of N-w York on April Wh, 
19U, Mr. Root made comments 
which should be considered now 
by Wm. RftosieKefir and f»artfeah Re 
publicans. These paragraphs are 
fromnlr. Root's address: 

"Pot feat' years to come the 
Democrats will be in control in 
Washington, and, as we love ouri 
countrs-. We must give to that 
paTtv S ou! ' ^'hole-hearted, earnest.! 
sincere support. Hist as if every"i 
man .there was a Republican.) 
ThatTs tie* onh' way wecanprove 
not o^ly.oor love for our cOnn-' 
try Hrt tliai. the Republican par-, 
| ty loves its country mo-c than 
; place and power. 

"W» need no coalition go, ern- ! 
mont to make us loyal. We Will 
luak ■- a coalition ourselves with 
every Democrat in the country 
The coalition of the United States 
b- of all its people to hopi 
hands of th« go\ ernrofifbt 
I'nited States. no matter 
from which party it comes. 

"It is necissary to make a 
national army with singleness of] 
purpose and sympathy, "esponsi- 
ble to one commander in chief, : 
and not stoop to bickerings. 
, ''fl h *. r " wili bo " ^'iticism :■; ";«nci 
fault-findings and discontent, lai 
that has been an Incident t'oalf' 
our wars. It is an incident to our ' 
ir -e-and-easy democracy. It will 
corns again inevitably. 'l)o not let 
us join th- hand o/ faint-hearts j 
when the time of criticism comes, : 
or withhold our support. When ; 
the {inevitable shortcomings of i 
democracy must come, then is the 
for stout hearts to stand by ! 
country and say that no i 
matter what mistakes are made ' 
we will stand by our government • 
and our count' v. 

"We will not. permit the chorus' 

or [discontent aud criticism r to 

obscure the real instincts or pa-' 

rlotism. We wijl s'.aml bv the j 

now and all shout! 



h>vt-ra;:rnsrr >../„„, f/fO^ S/x-/'„<.^ K rr Town Car., 

f//9j; Ttttnni: Gt r r ' ii ' itk Atl- Ife.Utifr Top, SSSS 

Touring Car. S7J5-, Roarfjter, S745 

Ail Pricrs F. O. B. Detroit 



W. L. KIRKPATRICK, Agt 
BURLINGTON, KY. 

Farmers and Consolidated. 




We Have Always Wanted To 
Handle the BEST Manure 
^- And We've Got It 




• A? ^! our fiends know, we have been engaged 
lnthef arm implement business right here for a long 
tifjie. WeVe made it a rulfc to handle only thor- 
oughly reliable goods. No matter how tempting 
a maker's tffot}6§Mdh is, we leave it alone, unless 
we are convinced that the article will be of real 
value to pur customers. 

Now please keep this rule of ours in mind and 
men come in and see the 






hosannas. \V- will stand- bv the I 
President as we stood by Lincoln 
uti n the fajn. -hearted were cry ! 
'n^r tliat the war was a failure/ 
No .such far-si?hted and pa- 
tjao jc sentiments have comofrom 
the hps of JVlr. Roosevelt formanv 
V-ars. IV has lost the posiiion 
be bad with the country in 1912. 

The address of the Secretary 

<linchne< th« nails of his Senate 
Committee defense and making 
' position of the \V;,r Depa.'I 



a real, blood-red, rip snorting oon'inient ai>mo** 

cert hitch bell, vou are mostly Iit' L ,i! ,, ' i J ,1)s 1H n '" 
rabbit. Yo,t are altogether Too ,:'",' ife^ V ^^ 
easy. ■ Why. I understand, you i ! , ,„■ * V, co l ' I' fe "'a 1 , "" 
oven^hy at cooking children' in ' h;,v- „.,. , .^ " U .";"' P™ 
their o,n,g,,,ae. You_oughl to tu4>s S moi' , t'.e' ■ S -.1 



ybpd tb- imagination of the rn »] 

'.""-"",'':' A '^:ie ; .l,M'ii among 

jU ,nll " s . '' !>• time !),,;:„„,, 



"V 
ctaticism 



/Well, T guess. Any old wav We 
turn*t it into a. pa>h oi Bot- 
t<.ml(*as Cnissi^i ove.iiiiht. That 
anciept partj who ,-,n uleks thru 
Jhnrthps and u- ,1 them to 
^^0> ^lounds was a pooj 
fish It thinking up (.hlngs. W r 

woutf-maite rum gtceu with en v>. I.' war k 
U« tIH'w poisonnH a u hole m k U ' iZin 
'<h jjAs^hoai* 



v< 4,- 



And 




Vlities, i- i,. 

""I'' Cd (he w :ll . N- ou le! all 

and cavilling stop: Let 
>'mieut bistoi.v b M buri.-d! Lei 
W Vni'iaeans { „,,,,, , j 

•""' condition .-ali/.e that if the 

'''I'' Ub it will l„- bil,.- 

£""»' ''''• "•iiion huH.m.ve, 

•"'V'" 1 " , "' n , M " ^'"I'l has nev 

known Nacli ., war. b,., „, 

•' 'V"' ■ '" «■ co-o,,,,, ,, i,. 
M show ih.. M . ,,„,, Amfrbinlsm 

■forget OVSi ,,.eal 

mlnti.kiu ... m, 

th h. i -beaded 

m SSjtl UMiniK Mv 

JjyUmirt* A 



•d <M»rienjH»0 

mi" 

Kn*f»*lf^» 









Registered J| U -j.Pat.Off. 

Manure Spreader 

The fact that we have 
this machine set up, ready 
to demonstrate, shows 
that we believe there isn't 
a better spreader made, 
there had been we 

would have found it. "New 
Idea" is the original wide- 
spreading spreader. Built 
to spread outside its own 
wheel track when other 
machines merely dumped 
manure behind. Low down 
and light draft, easy to load, 
J easy ou a team. Its chain 
conveyor brings every 
scrap of manure to the two 
cylinders where it is thor- 
oughly pulverized and 
thrown onlo swiftly re- 
rir.,W^Spre.d i MM««. eEwBtt u, voUang ^paddh^thaj 

and depth across three oar* rows. This makes driving over spread 
manure unnecessary. r • 

,. Tha New Idea Spreader can't clog aad spreads at will, 3, ft, 9, 12, 15 or 
IS loads per acre. It'has a chain drive—no gears to break or strip from 
co , d °L, mdcr SU(W <* «rain. Wide lires fit the "New Idea" for use on soft 
sod. The New Idea Spreader is thorooghly well built of exceptionally stiff 
and sturdy materials, and the makers cheerfully guarantee it for a yea* 
against breakage from any cause. With proper care it will last a lifetime. 

Now here is a machine that will give you dollar for dollar on a moder- 
ate Investment in rnlffyiear's time; because if used regularly it will absolutely 
save the full fertility value of manure and put it on the soil in such condi- 
tion that growing plants can get it alL ^ 

The New Idea Spreader will save you -money. Come In and sec It 
I'relhtbwn. You'll be interested. . *• 

WcVc a book here we would like you to 

r*«<l- ItelpingMolharNatUMi." TVIIomore 
about the care anil tue of manure than you 
, „ . , . ever thought of. Written bv an otocrt and 

lull of ns^up<t»ra*a*ffl*rt!*$Jeo«flc data. Don't forrct tble^-ft'e Importaat. C ** M -" ""* 

• Vou rsf of better farming. 



\ 



Pibowski's Cafe 




I 

THAT O 

Neat Little Place $ 

For Farmer. Workrahn, Merchant, Clerk M 



and Professional Man. 

Commercial Luncheon from II a m to 1:30 p. 

m. Supper S to 7 p. m. 

- Covington,K«ntuc ky. 1 




next time you' 

BONT FORGET TO 



ASK 



US FOR THIS FREE BOOK Bbou !. , ^ e s".'**. an *'!.«« : . ol «a»ute "« 



J. W. GRANT, Agent, BulJittsville, Ky. 




Sulxscribe for the Recorder. 
Only $1.60 the Year 

Read Our Advertisements and Profit Dv riiein. 

_ _ - a 




ilTTilR SIGHT 



'M'akt's the world brig-hter. Many i>eo- 
plo,|fo through life with poor vision, 
with only a few dollars would aiake 
'them sec perfectly. DoTj'f do it— it 
paysto take care of your eyes,. 
Phone South 1746 

T^T^lWTW" * «ITHIWOTl'H.JM,fi«r. 

• X JEUX1 43 ,61 3 Madison Ave. - Coringtoa. Ky 



a scoTf Chambers 

Em uli»an(l Funeral Director 



^•**5FC» 



WALTON, KENTUCKY. 



* 



Will Furnish Any Kind of Equipment You Desire. 

* ' 

Consolidated Phone 3S. 



Farmers Phone. 



PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

Undertaker & Embalmer 



Magnificent Horse Drawn 

or 



Luxurant Ambulance 

at 

Automobile Equipment Your Command— — 

Calls Answered Promptly in Auto at all Hours. 

t HONKS f NKiHT _ g 

ERLANQER, KY. 



THE TROTTING STALLION 



. I.. . 






ST. ALPHONSUS 2:24, 

By CHARLEY HERR, the iron hone - 
of the grand circuit 

Will make a season at Er- 
langer Fair Grounds in 1918. 
$20.00 to insure a living foal. 
Get your mares booked early. 
J. F. RAFFERTY, Agent. 




O. M. ROGERS, Owner. 



J. L. HAMILTON 

, UNDERTAKER 



Verona. - - Kentucky. 

All of th« Up-to-Dati! methods and 
reasonable charges. Fine line 
of Monument Work. 
Telephone— Calls answered prompt- 
ly, day or night. 



Phone South 87J. 

J. W. RUSSELL BRADFORD 

Attornky-aT-Lav, 

502-601 Coppin Bldg. Covington, Ky. 

Will practice in all thp courts. 
With O. .M. Rogers 

DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

Will be rffc Burlington evorv Monday 
prepared to do all dental work- 
painless extraction, bridge and nlate 
work a .specialty. ' 

AH Work Guaranteed 



NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION 

Notice is hereby glvnti that! the 
Big Bone. Springs Hotel and Wa- 
ter Company, Incorporated, Is clos- 
ing its husiness and winding up its 
atr»iim. 

C. L. BONIFIELD, l'refiidnnt. • 
T. A. Noi.an. Secretary. 



I Can Sell The Earth. 

List your farm with inc. (iivtrfiw 
ii trial— just write description and 
number of acres and mail if, tu 

Win. E, BAIRD, Erlanger, Kv. 
Erlanger Deposit Bank BLUg. sia 




DR. W. E. FISTERa 

Veterinarian, 

WALTON.'RY. 

(.'alls by telephone answi rod night 
or day. ' Phone W. 






Nevar blow yoiir Wfttfei fur trash so 
long us .V4»ii nre homeless or there's a 
Liberty lend to buy. 



--. 



■t 



Not si tie rottenness in the worl«! 
is oeXiVsu-inHptiVfl h«t »,M (hat bsc 
b«en Oertimn hiHiJrwl has heeu fotteu 



COAL 

The Famous 
Raymond City Coal 

Once Tried Aiwa* Used, 
la Kept on hand constan- 

Prices the Lowest 

Give Us Your Coal Order. 

Ox Brand Fertilizer, made 
by Tennessee Chemical Co. 
We handle all grade*. 

Petersburg Coal Co 

Petersburg, Ky. 

I L W. Kassebaum & Son, 

MON0KEKTS, 

H Large Stock on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipment 

HS Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 



sk 



. Execu tory N otice. 

All persons indebted to U"m estate 
of E. T. KrutJ!, deceased, luustcomp 
forward and settle same, those bar- 
ing claims against said estate must 
present them to th* utiderslgnea 
proven according to la w. 

Mrs. fJJBL lOVUT'/, Exeeutrlx. 
Klloy A Riley, Attys. 

>♦« ' ■ «» >' ' I' w'ii — ft* 



•"> I i l„ . w. 



<lennft«<efAr1eiipT Mawma to fc«v»> fa 
^aded ,«eo | ,|t„ » u ^ mi 

ftiiigh aa 



nriiMH'y awnK 1^1 



Boone Co. Farms Wanted. 

q.lst your fsxau la 








- 



"V"""V*"V 



^Wf 



ItN 




BOONE CcJNTY RECORDER 



WAR DEMANDS 




OF 



Civjfan Relief Dire* 
Sfiries of Article%jjj|l! 
Iffrorlance of Assistance to 
QUisted Mens Relatives 





TftvA-in 

nmc, 




DAIRY I fetal W 
FACTS " 



■ 



"I- 

of Nurses 
Service 



m 




ung Women 
to Fill Ranks 
In Red Cross 



COWS NEEQ SOME MINERALS PRINCIPAL CAUSE OF SCOURS 



Animals Unabl<£ to Utilize Sufficient 
.Amount From Ordinary Ration to 



, 



Support Body. 



m 



th.. «5? "'rector of civilian relief for 
ami «?,',' "'T "V:, 1 . CroM in Ohio, ln.lif.ria 
■gntuiky The »uhjecta of llie oilier 
"•tUica in n,e series are: "Waal 
gOU llotnu Service 1*. -ixirmnHRr- 
f U..,r;r. snrvlro." "Wlifft 1!.iJnefto 
••«•», ^1 ,""""' Service WorkirdJ'- arid 

< wnmlttcemen," 



lour . 
lu-.i 
Aid 
.Tuu 



» rv\ 



30,i;Un Homo 



L. Fieser, 



y- By James 
Direj^>r, Civilian Relief, Lake 
^eton, American Red cro.ss. 
T^& new 
Jki 



Divi- 



words -Home Service — 



11 and Kentucky 

gvars outbreak ten months ago 

few chapters then organized 

rose work and popular knowl- 

f it centered only around prep- 

sOl hospital supplies, , equip- 

fe-lWse hospitals 'and supplying 

isoim*!; »s»d provwiqua of j* 

"h of disaster. 

came the unfolding of a niul- 

of; -OtUor ^chapter obJucjitioo*-. 

tion of war funds, driving for 

sod membership, organization W 

auxiliaries, turning out huge 

tof knitted articles, surgical 
gfV and, ( Jhri stntas packet s. 
ry; these obligations -model of 

Ser 
100m 



King wrto^a, r j ^ tie el'Sibh^onsMnias (h e reseryt 
"«n He**i€a**^5Wkie* fc fe eallinc,.* of W &$dr«i 



an- th e o rg a n1aanow'ofHom«i 
committees, better known in 
communities a8 civilian relief 
comfiaktarv;. -'VFreqiientiy tie oetivi.' 
.lies 
wen 

1011 jSl*' /L hi * becaus** Importance of 
J,OD SP' Service had nol been clearly 
defingjrl. Now: through the efforts of 
the Jh ircau of Civilian Relie f of the 



% p r IHmip^Servicc uoinmifctees 
>i4KH^<1 'by other chapter roro- 



B ision. head qu a r te r s ar-'L'Tevc-' 

chapters have orpine lo a clear 

s| aWi.n< Of the Attain ess Of Red 

l loin* SeTv^lfl relation to- war 

ompleta victory. 

fo th* KT>tfef«r' public, notably 
I* so-called rural communities, 
Service is little better under 
Ethat) it was by the chapters a 
StiHtfJf of five months back. 




„ ^^|pi**%^^:^^P^^«j"P r «P^^ti«»« tor home ami, UHtob.Mm 



HiMtieriiterwiaesRist, fee the nation s 
*-ssuVance that the enlisted and con- 
•c.riflted man's family shall not suffer 
for |-ant of any essential thing wit Win;, 
(the flower of the nation to give. 
| The Public'* Conception. 
I "Tes," says Mr. Average Citizen, 
f'bu^ isn't the government- providing 
(•war^-Iak insurance, apd will it- not pro-. 
rridtp separation,, allowance .. where 
necessary? Ish'f'tt a fa 



TMukniji it pA/ldtlc y, llir)ff v,V,m. 
en throughout the country are looking 
for ways in which they can serve the 
governiueui .a.t the present time. 

yuk Btimtq. T ,>f Nursing or the Lake 
Division, American Red Cros*. Cleve- 
land, points out that there is no form 
of service open to women more great- 
ly needed than that rendered b^ » u ° 

?U£?# of the cor. 

The Rf d Cross Nursing Service— 
for which, most registered nurses are 

ft for 
corps. 
Adindnils of 
highly qualified nurses for service 
abroad in our own hospitals and those 
of our allies. .It is also calling many 
hundreds for service In the base hos- 
pitals in our cantonments. 

"We have," nays Miss Roberts. 
"nurseK enough to meVt our present 
need..byt. lp order to dWatain our 
fieatth ftfahu*ard¥' a r nonfe' during 'and 
after the war and to continue to care 
for, qui- armies many, monr must be 
trained. "' r • 

"The need, for akillei nuraes during 
the next few years will be the great- 
est the world has ever known and the 
number p£ students in the spring 
classes now being enrolled in the 
fc chobK" Jor s nurses throughout the 
country should he limited onlv hv the 
teaching facililies of the schools and 
•by the clinical facilities of the hos- 
pitals with which they are, connected.'' 

The committee on nursing of ihe 
general medical board of the Council 
of National Defense has encouraged 
those hO H fitt a la pc'sscssing sufficient 
clinical material tn increase their fa- 
cilities r.ir Ihe (Tim-otigh training of 
nurses aaiU jit many instances this 
has b*ejt Jou<'. 

Follon4ftg jue some or-UjO advan- 
^Se^'n. riursfojc ed4icaH.oh aiid Sonw 
point**'*- young woman BhOuld con- 
sider in selecting a 'traiJiMg- tittim* 
J Nursing education not only pre- 
1 pares for a large variety of pro- 
fessional fields, but is an excellent 



In other 

miiiemi ele- 

fhe civ. can 

ration, and the body 



It llfl/: beell fle/iliitelv jifuvcd that 

eow« ihtch pftnfluce a benvj- flow of 

Ibjlk are not M W« to utiliy.,,. sufficient 
«iii«n»l matter from the ordinary ra- 
flf'n go niainMin the proper quantity 
01 minerals in the body 
^orfls, more ..f these 
menim are given off than 
Obi' 'n from ihe 

Of the cow is robbed of Illinf . ra , "&. 
uients lo simply the deficiency. 
In sedition tt , .,„ ordioary ration, 
••"-•<• of eommoQ salt per ce* 
*"iy is sii/ij.i.,,, to maintain the 
proper quantity ,,f sodium aud chlo- 
rine »u a cow. .producing 40 pwuuds o£ 
JJIk dally An ordinary mixed ration 

nee!, I !r -* *****"**™ tor everjj t^brtgh^nnllght 
,need of .., high-producihg cow. The -" 
tlem^nt calcium or lime appears to be 
.frflofcnt in all cows except those wi«» 
*;*e^ lbw milk production. 
£.'**& dcflcleacy of minerals In tfc^ 
.ft»t|<5^K had no apparent effect on the 

ftuottjot or composition of the milk. 

act proves fhsf the deficiency 

reome, » 9 inr~xs p os alb le. -py- 

fH n !© 1 e,, ' rtlftlt *t&en'fr6m'rhe body 
pffi tlfti cow. While the nitr 

p?5he nitrogen from clover was h ^40 Per. cent nolntion of forinahle 
nifty as valuable, I.ec^.'o i, was hyde haS U ' 8 ° beCQ f ° und to be ,,n 

*■ We" iflnt «.f water. A,fm.»onful nr two 




Feeding From Dirty Paile or Giving 

Rations Unhardeneo* Stomachs 

Cannot Properly Digest. 

Those wh<i rai<e ymmg f»»lv^ by 
hand Inow that .scoum Is mv ajf tne 
greiiiosi, jt'.uot the greatest, source 
of loss. Dh C. C. Wpp, veterinarian 
at th<- South Dak-ola colle»»'. >says 
feedim.' frMi. dirty palls, or f/vdlnc 
ratlorm the unluivdened stomachs of 
the young calve.-! cannot digest, jtre 
the two main causes from which this 
trouble may arise. 

The milk pails cannot be kept too 

e<can. Scrupulous <3tc istust h '- 

xervetl if the feed pails are not to be 

Ihe source of scours. Washing after 

ouch fc-cding with cold water n» not 

enough ; a thorough, scaldiug at least 

"S^Jl.Jtyg. Mf essential and exposure 

on evary rlear day 

will not come amiss. Bacteria are 

little thing*, but tb* way they live 

, •f^Jii'^tiptyi^i rOOiarkable, ami flie 

s tbejr: can d«, vtheji^Ui*,^ g*i 

assuiies ©ghty pwa?oHiioo«. 

When the feed Is hard to digest and 

the first evidence of stomach disorders 

appear. %tt d oge of ' physic in tbe best 

cure. A few tnblespooufuls of castor 




TTU'RSDAY PRHIUfARV 



l»H. 



HEADING BACK FRUIT TREES 

Necessity of Cutting Out Diseased and 

Useless Branches Recognized by 

Fruit Grower. 



Tics „r.. l,.-rt.T"with a little prun- 
iDi.' annually than with an occasional 
sever* pnminir. Rome people head bfcclc 
their tr.es (1 „it^ freely eucb year, 
while others vi ;1) |,..|je v e in tiniest riet - 
od growth do not. Everyone tecojr- 
nixfs the necessity of CUJtHng ont dead, 
diseased pn d us.-i. ■--• br nn c heH and 
lhos.::uhich rub .,r tnterfcro with eftch 
other. 

Heavy pruning tend- t,, produco 
wood. Old trees arc rejuvenated by 
severe cutting back. Weak--— -ving 



d. vo 

est In ■ 

at b 

ed Upon 

conld 1..- 
more. ]t 

Monetary 



olr 1 or an (Hjfml amount of snlts will 



tusts ^ss&ss tjk rr"- A r"-"" « "™ 

of the solution may then be added to 
tii o. Calf's milk as-many ^iojes a day 
■raj irs lanirvis cAidltfcis *mand. 

PREVENrCOW FROVKICKING 



fer^*herefore priicticjilly tlw sa^,^^ | ^ 

LARfiEST RFrlnitt^ iaii « "" 



UflfeEST RE 



Cov^, High fn Flesh at Calving Time 
Gives Much Richer Milk for Long 
4 Period Than When Thin. 

% i f r — 



*n^ol*~p«bHo^»&d^ 
«^.Alaioat upou enrollment the atn- 
« dent begins her servioa to the com- 
munity, in helping to. care fof.ths.alck, 

^aa a? part 6§ hex'InitTiiflloA "antL'tralb- 

pw; r: ^ : v - .^ : 

3 Life in mbst^sVhools Is healthy, 
wholesome: simple and regular, it 
is full of vrvld human interest the stu- 
dent sharing u* dewpest realities of 
Ufa 



Mt. Average f iti^en is correct but 



-.ffffottrl iuy.ivitUiaioi-s_Jia,ye^^hau:» 
Ihaf ji cow high in flesh at 'calving 
M"ic> v gi ves very much, -richer milk for 
Borne time than would be' the case 
tverf£ she thin. This knowledge is 
Sowwpade use of by every breeder of 



Method Shown in Illustration Is Easy 

and Safe— Leg. Tied by Means 

of Strong Strap. 



(By E. esc i r. i 
I had a heifer which pcrststed in 
kicking and struggling until it was 
simply impossible to milk her. A 



Oil and f ^idopt^d Jt at once. It Is 



* I 



MM cattle who &tttfjrtoi 'J^SJSaW the StrQ1) M 
tnrgoat pe.ssibl^ec|r| for, ft, Ilk and ^ ^ -""f^ 
ilitt% fat groducilan. s j: T 

■ Another interesting discovery is that 

flfheS a co« is undeated tia{ tempo- 

H|rlS she 'give* rlcner 'idlk ' rather 

'■thjngtninher as might be expected 

*ayuikp of great imi>ortance m conncc 



Conner?* 
tton*ith making tests of cows and a 

resulted Irt Vrmtg- rbttcinsioris 1 from 
many experiment" con'dii'cfeir " wltli 
coms la-Uhe, jam, ■^■r.j ..„.,-. ..,-. , — . 






\ 



he is thinking only In terms of money 
relief. And It Is to conviiicc-him.that 
admjnistration of money relief in only 
■onewf many features of Home Serv- 
ice that this series of articles on the J 
xudlpionts of Home Service hare been i 
(Prepared. C 

S«pn this brief stimniary of the op- 
portunities confronting Home Service 
comfeiittees in your county and you 
iwiH-agree that tlt« oppoMimUies havo 
♦ncome the duty, ancj privilege of an 
jnpstianding, patriotic, American citi- 
aenship. 



1. Conservation by service of hu- 
inan resources wherever deterioration 
i* threatened 1n a soldier's or a sail- 
tor's home. 

2. J Temporaiy relief of families in 




good school 

lar profes- 
sional life and work with an assured 
livelihood. No weary struggle to get 
a foothold to show what she can do. 
The Hospital has carried her over that 

•*lage. Her work is ready and. waiting 
for her if she successfully completes 
her training. 
* The student is at no expense for 
tuition, board, lodging, laundry, 
uniform, etc., in the greai majority of 
schools. Only a few schools charge, a 
tuition fee, for preparatory course. 

'The »tudent ( is alsct cared for in ill- 
ness. 

Salaries compare favorablv 



6 



with 



salaries of other trainod women. 
tn— some fields they are higher than 
thft average. Especially is this true 
of teaching, and administrative work 
either in institutions or in Public 
Health Nursing. Opportunities for ad- 



ersonal service 
or sailor, cspec 




bled. 

An inforrtiation .se»-v-jco 'Ayiilcji 
'vo time, troubje and anxiety' for 
relattveK cfJ enlisted men. • 
dvancement of home standards 
ver possible;' l>ut especially 
,whei)Ji the lack of help is likely to 
«au3& family disintegration. 

^Sustains Soldiers' Morale, 
b irutv be thin best v»liWei;s .'in 
prjUl (I quote you from The 
1 of Home Service issued by 

iiyell with IlioTr faiiinies at' home, they 

,mnrb^ of Tlie army- Ihal nil 1m" 
IvorUt factA-^tegMs^fnli. 

it. is {:bfe itatrlOOc luti^fciAdi J 
hun(49l|4riai( 4inortjj»tly j c| 



whifch there has been a delay in pay- Meaun cursing. Opportunities for ad 

Eienta, or in which there fe'trn' f'nter- '■'■' "• D '*W are many and .steadily in 
en<*y. creasing. 

; 3.^ .Basponaibiiity for regular and Choice of Training School. 

fDonHnued asslatane^-. in- cases not. ^ R) Be CRref «i '«n ehooBlng a train- 
;e4 .bx < ^m,^wven.t, allowaiice- I in .^ 6dS ^r ^ SUrfi thal lfs Hrploma 
H<TTtt'*W faTftlirOs In need : anl -tp>c-1 ;wi ' li *■«**» you. -to register in yottr 
In the United States of men who 8 ' ate - 
the sendee of our allies n i h) , That i,s ** ,J .WVivU. onal standards 

: - N U?>e. turned ^ f*^" a 

icciallv when lie' ' fOfhat »f olfers tliOrough training 
In medical, surgical, children's and 
maternity nursing. 

fd)- That the housing and Hying 
conditions arc such arf to ensure the 
health and well-being of student*. 

. (e) That the working conditions 
are modern and the hours reasonable, 
(f) That the general standing of the 
school and Its graduates is good. 
Where any doubt exists on jtbls point 
further advice should bo sought, 
through officials of the State Nurses' 
Association or the State Hoard of Ex- 
aratn«rs. 

~ -Addr«SKas aud . further, information 
can be 5 *(J»tain<*d by, writing tp the Bu 
raatr of Wniataa. Lake- Diiaaionw Ameri- 
ca" flf^ Cross, Qarfleld building, 
Cleveland, 

I ■ 



HRM FOUNDATION FOR DAIRY 

I '>--' : r-'' ".' -; ' .- T- 

No Amount 0*^ r e«d^ll %afte ft-ofl*. 
- ablo|cowitiO%tJfion* Tftaf Dais 5- 
Not Have Milk Tendency. 

feujjdf your dairy b^jft f, n a firm = " 
fpUndawoni No umuoHFurnoeo ^fllt ' 
"juke d pro fi t a bl e cow out of one that 
does not inherit a strong tendency to 
give m|k. One tpust, therefore/ use 
cire in selecting tlic foundation stock 
for the herd. The bull should be -pure- 
bred w|th a line of ancestors whlrh 
show psoduction. Because one animal 
is purebred is not a guarantee that 





LAUGHTER OF B1RD9. 

"vernmont oiiieiuplaie* mi im- 
mi dist* assault upon the Insect pt-su 
nr the eropa of tbe country, 
■ that with vigorous action 
prr ("nt of the losses rnfllct- 
Amcrican crojta by them 
prevented, probably much 
has been estimated that die 
value of the cropa destroyed 
by insects in this country umounta aa>- 
tmally to at least $'.20,000,000— -nn e»- 
tinmte not based upon guess, but on 
leei, o|.>eivalion eitejidinK over a 
n'omber of years. Such is, in parr, tb» 
tax that, thi* country pays for allow- 
ing some '-'.."oo.DiHj men and boys to 
ge forth annually and vm their rage 
for s*we'e,-s slaughter u|mjii the birds ^ 
engaged in the beneficial worl of. 
die 'kin- tin- ravages of the-e Inawta 
— the bh-ds whicli are the natural al- 
lies of the farmer, ways Florida Times- 
Union, five per cent of this annual 
loss is tfCG.OOO.OoO. The amount tlu^ 
may possibly be saved is even more 
than that— an addition to the wealth 
of tlie country, which might aid mate- 
rially In reducing the cost of living. , 



Discontent with self is a necessary 
frailty, in spite of the fact that it Is 
often weakening and disugreenble, for 
it is the mental and moral equivalent 
of that factor of variation of which wa 
hear so much in the recent evolution- 
ary philosophy. For a man does not 
41,1 tu rally and -iinsny -rteod to 
himself as the years go On and 'habit 
Listens upon him. We may call it the/- 
Centrifugal, the center-dying quality,' 
that which saves us from stagnation.; " 
It would be worse for US to be content 
— more stiek-in-th e-pfr ud people— fox 
we are now so far aloug In the,.slow r 
process of climbing that to stand stiM 
would really be (if tbe bull may be 
excused) to go backward. In some 
form or other, ancestrnl certainty, and 
.individual quite tra much, dissatisfac- 
tion with present attainment aud pres- 
ent status of the soul is a necessary 
and a prophetic quality. 



Tree Headed Back. 

trees should be pruned more closely 
than strong growers. If a tree's ener- 
gies are largely devoted to growing 
wood the quality and quantity of fruit 
must suffer. Winter pruning stimu- 
lates wood growth, and summer prun- 
ing diverts the: energies to fruit bear- 
ing. Do the winter prnning while the 
tree is dormant find the summer prun- 
ing fd June. 



SPRAY FOR SAN JOSE SCALE 

Best Materiaf for Insect Is Lime-Sul- 
phur and May Be Applied In 
— November or December. 




Holding Cow's Leg. 

» 

e;ny and safe 'ami worked just fine. 
In n little while the heifer would stand 
without the *trap. 

- A very good method to cure a co\f 
from kicking and to teach her to Stand 
still while milking is to fasten a _-by-4 
limber securely to the floor and ceil- 
ing just back of tbe cow. then have 
a good, strong strap, with a buckle, pass 
around her hind right leg and Uteri 
around the 2-by-4 aud draw up tight 
and buckle It Drive n spike in the 
2-by-4 part way to keep the strap front 
slipping down when the cow struggles 
to get her leg free. 



(Was 




Service workers' of the A inert 
d Croes to care for lonely fam- 



fine Typo of Purebred. 

he willjbe n good animal, his pedigree 
(should [be investigated. Many small 
dairyman buy aged bulls so they can 
judge the production of his offspring. 
If good: purebred- eow.s cannot be had. 
Use tbejbest gttifle cows ohtaiuabte It 
niay boj said -that for production pur* 
poses, ijf good purebred, brjifcrnro used" 
on goofl eow.?, ; :.1th«r fonrUi " geuern tion 
will be| equal, to pwrebreds as far as 
production Is^- J 
i. 



SPEED OF STEAM SEPARATOR 

i 

Farmers Should Be Careful to Follow 
Directions Given by Manufactur- 
ers of Machine. 



Orchards known to be infested with 
San Jose scale should be sprayed as 
soon as ftjc trees .are 'defoliated- by 
frosts. Tiki sooner Uils is done the 
better it will be for the trees as scale 
insects will noon. weaken the trees so 
no marketable fruit may he expected. 

The host sprny material for scale 
Insects is llmo-sulphur. 

A good spray pump will he essen- 
tial. It is highly desirable that the 
liquid be under high pressure and 
that it be well distributed. A power 
sprayer is best as no hand {tower 
can be expected Co equal tm> original. 
But if only a few trees are to be 
sprayed u Imnd-pmver sprayer will an- 
swer the purpose. 

Spraying may be done in November 
or December. Then if a second spray- 
ing seems derirable It may be given 
In the spring or late winter before tbe 
foliage Is but. 



I'rola London comes (be 
that official German eslliuates of sub--. 
marine sinkings are uIhhU 50 per cent 
too high. Many bf the vessels tor- 
pedoed and reported sm1U succeed in 
making their way to port with their 
cargoes. Great expectations are en- 
tertained with reference to the help 
which the I'nited .States will be able^ 
to contribute in bringing the U-boat 
campaign to an end. Tbe, rapidity with - 
which naval vessels are undergoing 
Construction in the United States and 
Great Britain is one of the wonder* 
of fhe' war. 

■ - . . - .■■■■,, — 1*4* ■ 

It is, true that Americans .as a 
toop their houses too hot in, winter.; 
Fuel Administrator Garfield's sugges- 
tion that the ( eomfng wlriterfcUt afford" 
a fine occasion for correcting, this mis- 
take is well conceived. However, this 
will not reconcile any householder td 
finding diffidnlfy In, getting coal when 
he needs It, or to paying more for It 
than he considers a fair price. 



- ■ i',:.. 

rule : 



CLEAN COW STABLES NEEDED 



Some tests conducted by the Indiana 
station show that much crealn may be 
lost by not runqtng the crealn separa- 
tor the proper uuuiber of revolutions. 
Fnrmcrs should he particular about 
following directions of Hie several 
Thnkeg of separators. It- has been es- 
timated that owr 8f» per cent of the 
dairymen, tu*n their machines twj 
slpwiyv , The question of speed, there. 
I ioreybeepmev 6jae of much importance, 
«ya. and; dairy nieti should look after this 



APPLET FOR FAMILY TABLE 

One-Half Acre Could Be Made One of 

the Most Satisfactory Pieces of 

Ground on Farm. 

Broadly speaking, there are two 
kinds of apple orchards, one run for 
profit and one for the family. The 
commercial orchard Is a specialty re- 
qnlrinsr skill, experience, and above 
all, a peculiar mental bent. 

As to the small family orchard, there 
seems but one possible conclusion, 
namely this: Every farmer should 
have nt least twenty-five hearing trees 
of mixed varieties for his own use. 
Thai would require just one-half an 
acre and by doing the right thing at 



If Uncle Sam could only devise a 
way to lay a tax of li) cents on, every; 
unnecessary telephone converaation 
what an Undressed, undisguised, stark 
naked blessing it would be. One of, 
two < lungs would be accomplished, the 
country would get all the money it 
needs to fight the war or the telephone 
would he entirely divested of a bur- 
den of intolerable nuisance. 



Another autumn has passed without 
a word from Sir Thomas Upton con- 
cerning plans for another Shamrock, 
But the gallant skipper win yet have; 
another go at the America's cup. an 
no sportsman on this side will feel 
.shade of resentment if at last he suc- 
ceeds in carrying away the bric-a-brac. 



* 



The* AinerH^rfT Tied TroW Has pro- 
vided $132,000 worth of supplies for 



our fighting men .U^to be the relief qf stiffen is in Guatemala, 
bored that they -snrm v ^ir1 he 



Good (Milk, Free From 
Odorj, Cannat Be -Secured Under 
•Unsanitary Conditions.' 

i "^v— ■ ■■ 

The lalrymnn cannot .get good /nUtt,, 

*"**"-"**%*&& PREVENTING HORNS ON CALF j BERRIES GOOD FOR ORCHARD 



feature Of lniK-'ipnd cream handling! the right time It conld be made one of 
t, With as ranch ejtrvfulness as they do 1 the most satisfactory pieces of ground 
I juuy other detail of milk handlist 



on the whole farm. 



N i 



men' In real; taartart. Not 
■ftljghir enemies, but our allies, and 
frbo American people; as wait will be 
Jng them. 

ivy report -Worn' the learning 

and from ,'lbf / ftMUfejUfettfl 

»ns Ihe excellent spirit of our 

Will th#v maintain this 

while thouaami <yo| •^ l t*rJ'rf>m 

through tropC uflf *j)i ftfTrfla, 

victorluua end? 

ANSWER WIU,* 

iMdi 

can Rin nwoM. 





A pitrly-Wf exherifldced Red Cross re- 
IW .worksjrs hti< a)uv been sent to 
Guatemala. 



Thi 



The American RedCrosa In France 
dot'is not ndndVto lt» staff am Amer 
lean, o| draftMigo unjesa.^bay present 
tbe l«^>P«r cr.ilenllals from the 
Untied States military or naval au J 

Ma 1 1 mi . why lavy . 1 There 
fiSHtai) or nniral 



6« SciJiO»f.>i 



CO 

I ■ 

y 



OK 



■city lnajrket. when h 
,»a an unsanitary conditroau Wben th* 
'•Hianurej is left to pack under the coW*» 
. ^ fleet, mold and rot, ^he odor la so 
j^rong that It will cQutuuiitmU' the 
; *ilk eren while It is lujlpj, diuwn 

irem tl COW. 



-EEDS FOR DAIRY CDilrVS 



Advantage in Practice, Kxoopt 



3Ame v V"P«liAtabi» Food 
May Be^Coneunted. 



When Animal la Week or Two OI<$ 
. Bnb Caustic PotMh on Little Nubs 
—Protect From Rain. 

iNertli I>«Knl» K\prlaVni Station t 

y ' RoruS eati be pnveured front growl 

,i'«eg on n cnif yy rTibbiue laustic port 

ash ,«j(rr-tfre little nubs that develog 

-into fiorns. ,v rood tunc lo do tlu-| 

is when the eilf ts a week 01' two old 

Wrap on.- .ml u /' tNc slick of -^usthj 






Kentaehy. 




in no flttvaninmi.' in <tmkiug «* 
tdk feeds for dan v . <>\\a. tfoine 



en ml 

pulM 
1l£rr quBtittll.-« If Cooked, but 

Mru decrease thetr illgaetlbiuty. 



to 

■lay 



lUpHpitr to],i..iect ihe tinners, mn 
tin- other' ilnd rub oh the nubs tt.| 
cnreriil ituii n doe* rial rtlii iloao 111 

Xi i ai a mi l u u - i iv>> m >a. Mn u m Uu . Uti 

ll|l|lIlCUl|.>IIH, 

allowtng * h» th-r Wwtra wrt, ntmll 
at>i«adiii| 



Piece ta Not Complete Without Gen- 
erous Selection— No Other Fruit 
to Replace. 

An orchard is not complete without 
a generous, seiuiliou u* to kind and 
varieties of berries. Without the berry 
patch the orchard will hardly come 
up to your etpiK'tailons In Hiipplylng 
fruits during the frultbenrliti; season 
In fhet you will Ma* the hcnlmj and 
there will be no other fruit to lakfl 
their place. 



Lord Northcliffe says the United 
States will have to give up its Joy rid- 
ing and that multiplied thousands of 
-skilled chauffeurs 'will be acquired to 
operate the trucks used behind the bat- 
tle line. When joy riding comes to an 
end the people of the United States 
will then know the country is at war. 



- * 



England proposes to put the food 
profiteers in prisoa. Over here we ree- 
fer to them as grafters, gamblers and 
all-around seasnps. but that seems the 
limit of our displeasure: for tux Amer- 
ican gets a heap of satisfaction out of 
culling minus. 



American airplanes may lly across 
she ocean to the battle frout. As a 
matter of fuct. it Is impossible to fore- 
tell whai wonderful things will have' 
been ncconiplislied by the time thi* 
war, with lis stimulation of invention 
and i-c-ouicei'uliicss. is ended. . 



The dear girU should pcrhupn bo 
reminded ibat ne\er in tluvworld will 

Hie soldiers be able to weyr tlUMe 
bri-ln pink and blue ».\\ culcrs. 



Leaf, Crop F art 1 1 lie 1 •. 

lien manure, nimite 01 a»»la »r o\tb*r 

nltrtigeiiotis fetlllUcr may be put on 

a and Uml arena if tie] d*> uoi 

to b* gruMtaa *..u .tbuui 3UO 

puuuda |M-r iaWf Is aovd. 



Nb U lltunanon' is said to lw spnujlnj 
much or bis Rnaj'i' tune i.li.vlng uliUt, 
which is iHlmtl|edl) b.-Uer lioui It U» 
VMS coattned lo solitaire, 

lite rim ..f th» miUKhmit M neeeev 
«»ry (o convey a proper itnderxi*n4Mttg 
ef 1 a* fast aaiouui ut uvlhlug; teak Ut# 
ifmliel 



aBa« 



m 



•> 



\ 



THURSDAY FEBRUARY 



1918. 



BOONE CO. RECORDER 

.. RIDDl-LL. Publisher. 




THIRD INCREMENT CALLED 



Forty More Boone County Boy* 
Called for Examination. 



t<Mt will DO riMiuu^i i« .*"!w ;t «„r 
imp Taylor some time during \"* Jj-gjZ 
tlve day period beginning on j ^ ooera^ 



Tli" local Draft Board baa been 
ordered to call for examination) 

iortv oi Class One beginning n< xts 

Saturday, and the following nam 

ed have been notified to 

before the Board that day. Those 

selected will be required to 

to Ca 

th» fiv 

the 23rd inst 

170 H. W. Hager 

Hugh Kyle. 

Elmer Cnaj»m:ii>. 

H. J Aylor 

L. D James 

C. B Miller, 

Albert Grimshy. 

Hazel Pup-ham-. 

Pearl Kite. 

J. S. Pennington. 

O. E Souther. 



State News. 



Last W ed ne s d ay, Baa Murphy, 

who lives near Crittenden. says 
while riding horaeback hia animal 
tell and was lost in the snow.— 
Ouvnlon Newsv-Herahl. 

Mr. James Bogle had the mis- 
fortune last week to lose three 
largo steers. In some manner the 
cattle got into a tobacco bars 
and had eaten quite an amount of 
t o bacco before they were found. 
The loss is quite a he-ivy one ao 
the cattle weighed in the neigh- 
borhood of 1,200 pounds < i ach.— 
ML Sterling Advocate 

The Secretary took up all phas- 
es of the work of the War De- 
partment tha. have been the sub- 
ject of criticism and endeavored 
to explain the reasons for every 
act. We are inclined to think 
that all circumstances consider- 
ed, he makes a very gratifying 
showing for th» Government.— St 
Louis (ilolv-Demoerat. 

Neal Overby tolls us he has 
been keeping a record of the 
snowfalls this wintier, and that 
1.. last Frtdw,, 26 snows in all 
had fallen since the 7th of De- 
cember. Several snows have fallen 



*El ,t5a . F,idav, which will bring the 



•lb 

1S1 

184 

190 

20(1 

201 

202 

201 

205 

210 

214 

217 

219 

222 

227 

228 

230 

234 

237 

23b 

230 

247 

254 

259 

260 

263 

261 

268 

27C 



Lee Stephens. 
R. R Robbins 

E. H Gross. 

A. G Powers 
W. R Berkshire. 
Edward Zwick. 
Oscar Dennigan. 
W. H Carpenter. 
Robert Koons. 
Charlie O'Hara. 
Charles Richa rds. 
A. L Stephens 
W. H Grimsley 
W. C Greene 
Manley Gulley. 
Claude Arrasmith 
Sug Sturgeon. 
R. A Thompson 



J Garrison 

283 A. R Blackburn 

286 M. L Wasson 

46 Joseph Cloyd Kannady 

73 Rafe Koon.3. 

103 Wm. Lewis Blavback 

122 Paul Damrath. 

144 C. E Robinson 

223 Guy Webster. 

249 Charles E. Farrell 

373 Earl Beach. 

Prom the above list the remain 
der of Boone county's quota 
be filled. 



g | total up to about thirty. But 
let it snow on, and on, just so 
t snow in the bed.''— 
Tribune-Democrat. 

Alonzo Sherman, the proprietor 
' of the Campton Hotel', has in- 
formed us that he has sold the 
i lumber in the mammoth building 
land will in the near future tear 
the structure doWn. The hotel 
building is by far the largest 
building in town, having been 
built about twelve years ago dui* 
ing the oil boom to accommodate 
the developers of the Campton 
field.— Wolfe County Tribune 

j A friend of the Banner haspre- 
; scnted this office with .. a copy 
1 of the Louisville Weekly Journal 
j published under date of June 6. 

1849. This is perhaps the oldest 
! paper now in this section. Among 
I other item* one says that there 
j has been 25 deaths from cholera 
J at the Lexington asylum and be- 
j tween 55 and 60 new cases. Anoth 
j er item says that a pos^officehas- 
j just been established at San 

Francisco. Cal.— Sebree Banner 

j D. B Fox. the well-known fir 

i mer and fruit grower, who resides 

over the Boyle line in Lincoln 

cou nty was -ill this eityalstWei 

re&day and was a welcome caller 

I at this x office. Mr. Fox stated 

j to a Messenger reporter that 

practically all the peaches are 

I killed, also most of the grapes. 

I Mr. Fox has long been a fruit 

; grbwer and our readers can rely 

; on his statement, however much 

j they may regret to do so.— Dan- 

! vilie Messenger. 



h 



will 



Secretary of War Baker's state- 
i merit to the Senate Committee 
on Military Affairs is reported to 
-—- ■ I have made a profound impression 

Washington, Feb. 4 — rPovoat , on Washington, inclusive of Sen- 
Marshal General Crowder today a tor Chamberlain, whose criti- 
announced that the movement of c ig m5 r the War Department 
the last increments of men selects . provoked the statement. That is 
ed in the first draft will begin ; readily credible. It has made a 
on February J and continue for profound impression on the coun- 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 

K STEPHENSON BROTHERS ffl 

W HEBRON, KY. j^j 

Owing to the high cost of everything we are go- 
ing to sell for cash. It is easier to pay $5 than $25. 
SPECIAL ON GROCERIES: 

2 cans Corn * 28c ( 

*■* 2 cans Pork and Beans 28c 

U 2 cans Peas I 28c 

2 cans Saimon 35c 

2 large cans Peaches 35c 

1 can Old Ky. Baking Powder 10c 

2 boxes Puffed Wheat 28c 

5fl 2 boxes Puffed Rice. 28c 

lui Telephone Flour, per barrel $12.00 

FEED OF ALL KINDS. 
We run our truck to the city every day with coun- 
try produce. Give us a call. 

Stephenson Bros, - Hebron, Ky. 

J 

Be Wise 

It you need Clothing now is the time to buy. 
You read from day to day how everything is ad- 
advancing, and there seems to be no stop to it. 
Or if you need anything in a 

Man's, Young Men's or Bogs' 

SUIT or OVERCOAT 

Buy now. I have a complete line at prices that 

will satisfy you. 
A large assortment of Sweater Coats, Corduroy 




HILL'S 

SEEDS 

Meet all Requirements from 

PURITY 

to 

PRODUCTIVENESS 



and Duck Coats, and Corduroy pants await your 
inspection. 

Selmar Wachs, 

605 Madison Ave., - Covington, Ky. 

One-Half Square North of Old Location. 



Our seeds are the result of years of careful breeding 
and testing and of knowing where and when to buy. 



The Hill Standard in Seeds is the highest it is possi- 
ble to attain, yet we strive for improvement. 

Confidence in the house of HILL continues to grow 
just as surely as HILL'S SEEDS GROW. 

We will be pleased to send Samples and Quote 
Prices. Let us hear from you. We'll Save You Monty 

United States Food Administration License Number G-01206. 




f liFKTiTH 



Phone Order Dept. S. J*5S or 1856. 



try, and no man of fail* mind, 
even though ho has been given 
to doubt of tho department's ef- 
ficiency, will fail to acknowledge 
the force of this extraordinary 
showing — L ouis v ill e Courier Jour- 



a period of five days. 

This will complete the operation 
of the first draft, as all States 
will have furnished their full 
quotas- 

The movement will bring the 
strength of the National Army up I n " {l | 
to the 650,000 men contemplated i 

in th* first draft. I ^° fair-minded peisou can read 
^ ---- , Secretary Baker's statement with- 
in : v— i -u- a. b j out feeling that he honestly be- 
Keep TOUr Liberty BOndS. . u e vos the War Department has 
! done the very best possible un- 

Tho Liberty Bond is a govern- dor the circumstances. He dis* 
ment bond— as good a bond as the, amis his hostile critics by ad- 
government has ever issued. Just nutting frankly that there have 
as safe. Just as reliable ' been delays, shortcomings and 

Don't forget this. I false steps, but tha: these have 

Nor that in all its history th^ , teen "occasional rather than char 
government has never defaulted acteristic. and that they have 



one of its bonds. There is no bet 
ter security on earth. 
good as a greenback, 
its safety is concerned. 

It pays you four por cent, in- 
lerest annually, just as much as 
you can get for your greenbacks 
at any savings bank. And its face 
valiis will never shrink. 

There have been t,l mefi when 

below 



always been followed with lm- ! 
is as ; mediate efforts to apply the rem j 
so far as edy (required. His attitude yes- 1 
terday was uui improvement on j 
his former aii[>earance before the! 
committee in that he announced J 
at the outset he was not there 
to defend himself or his subordi- 
nates but to state the whole cir- 
cumstances.— Pittsburg Dispatch 

Geo. .Jett. of the Parkss illecom 



<«o*frnmcnt bonds went 

pari just as in recent months. Lib munity, sold to Webb & Rupley, 
ertv Bonds have sold below par. i forty head of 100-pound feeding 
But there w.is never anv valid ! shoats at '2d cents per pound ; 
reason whv thev should' have lot to the Tucker Bros., for 20 



cents per pound, and another 
bunch to Watts & Wade for 20 
cents per pound, and refused 
the same price for forty head of 
small shoats. They were an extra 
nice lot of feeding hogs, growtby 
I but not fat. Mr Jett owns two or 
three hundred acres of timber 
land down there where he raised 
the hogs in the woods in the sum | 
nvr on pea vines and other wild 
! growth, and early . winter on 
' l>e«chuut anil the general mass 
with very little corn if any. Who 
said the hill land in Boyle coun- 
ty was not a good investment?— 
Danville Messenger. 



done so. 

And they never stayed there so 
\ory long at a time. 

Since the war of 1812 there has 
never been an issue oJ [Lotted 
States bonds that failed to go 
above par. Some dropped below 
for a time but they always rose 
again. 

Five per cent, bonds due in 1^>'> 
sold at 127 in 1863. 

Six l>er cent, bonds due in 
1881 sold at 123' in 187H. 

Four per cent b»nds due in 
1907 sold ut 130 in 188". 

Another four per cent, issue tine 
in 1925 sold at ISO in 18M„ 

Two lx»r cent, bonds due in ~ " ~ 

1930 meat to 10!'. I here would have been nothing 

Anil "the dav is coming when '"ft along the river had the break 
Liberty Bonds' will sell above par. ^'l' followed a warm rain and a 
Whore the Government bonds .general melting 1 of th:+ snow. Thei 
went below par there was at- .V* disappeared in the very beat 
Ways just one reason. Souk one vv; <> ipSBIWe, and you are a-?ain 
needed monev quickly. In order reminded that nothing is so bad' 
to get it bonds were offered on thai ti may no. have been worse. 

the market for whatever price -^»— 

they would bring. This happened Flors s and cattle could not be 
usqully in tight mon y periods, driven <>ut Into the snow after 
With normal conditions thej «enl the sleet cam" and formed a heavy 
back to normal Values, crust on it. Breaking a path was 

Losh is lmpos&lUe upon a got - a laborious and very unpleasant 
e-romVnt bond investment. Baekoil taHK thai n iile r man nor bea*t 
ttMMe fconds are all the wealth « "ul-l uncb-i'tafte voluntarily. 

of ,. the nation, solne! Iiintf mon ■ 

than $250,000,000,000. bveiy doliai Being loaoated at ^he moulh Ot th« 
of thin wealth can be taxed by I Kentucky rUor, the little city ol 
th» Government for the redemp- 1 Carrolltop bad a two ring show 
tio» iiti . it* IxmdH. So long aw whe-n the ire carnival wan mi hist 
,*, U. S. Its bonds will urek. 

Investment on «Minh. » — 

:>Hntry i« *«' rlHu no I M (4 11, ■ United Btgtes %\bi 

other hat •ueh »aoaritj back ol|to n|iu|. an Infantryman tor 
tti bond*. 1 



LUCKY STRIKE 
CIGARETTE 

• "VTOtrLL enjoy this real 
X Bur ley cigarette. It's 
full of flavor— just as good 
as a pipa 

IT'S TOASTED 



The Burley tobacco is 
toasted; makes the taste 
delicious. You know how 
toasting improves the flavor 
of bread. And it's the 
same with tobacco exactly. 



non uo» Ji* 

ifo^Mhr-'Ait 






tybki |»ald 



u 111 

pri«*t» i-qual and 
for thtuu. 



In of u . 



Mm. \ll«.t Ciiiiner wm 
•<• * < r.»l davn Un wtM»k. 



ill 




OUR BUSINESS IS BANKING 

"We devote all our time, attention and energy to 
it. Very naturally, we want your patronage. 
What we have to entitle us to your business 
~T8 wholehearted attention to your needs; court- 
eous and prompt attention to you; thirty^>Jrears 
experience and more than $300,000 assets as se- 
curity for your business. If there is any thing 
lacking we do not appear to have discovered it. 
We appreciate pertinent suggestions for our im- 
provement, if yon find it necessary. 

Call and see us if you want to borrow, de- 
posit or loan money. 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 

We will serve you in making your purchase of 
War Saving Stamps and Certificates, without 
charge. No tax on your deposits with us. 

, 3 Per Cent on Time Deposits. 



I 



Qrt Guaranteed vy 



tnmnmnr*» + T9* 



II will have two carloads of DAYBREAK FER- 
TILIZER, pure animal matter fertilizer, in Erlan- 
ger, the last of January or the first of February. 
I will sell at the car or deliver it to your place. 

C. H. YuUELL, - Limaburg, Ky. 




Y* 



=as 



Take Your County Paper, . $1.60. 



BOONE COUNTY MOTOR GAR CO. 

(Not incorporated) 

FORD SALES AND SERVICE, 

TIRES, TUBES AND ACCESSORIES. 

arc now prepared to deliver your car immediately. 

Give us your Order before the Price go up. 

Touring Cert, $39000. Runabout*, $345.00. 



We 






F. 0. B. Detroit. 



Ha 



SENOUR & HICKS. 

UNION. KENTUCKY. 

OBsa 



J 



*, 



m 



t^^^M^M 



/ 



•."»<■■ , .-.■... . 



, 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



UN 



\ 



Administrator's Sale! 

The undersigned will sell at Public Auction to 
the highest bidder, beginning at 10 o'clock a. m., 
at the late residence of Chas. R Clore, deceased, 
in Hebron, Ky., on 

Thursday, Feb. 14, 1918 

The Following Property to-wit: 
Two Disc Harrows, Hinge Harrow, 2 Oliver Riding Plows, 2 
McCormick Mowers, Hay Loader, 2-h. Corn Planter, 2-h. Culti- 
vator, Oliver Cultivator, Corn Binder, Johnston Binder, 3 Plat- 
form Spring Wagons, 1-h. Spring Wagon, Road Wagon and hay- 
rack, 2 Dump Carts, Wheatdrill, Top Buggy* 2 Open Buggies, 
Corn SheJleiy-feternational 1 ton Truck (nearly new); Interna- 
tional 1500-lb. Truck, small Cider Mill, Manure Carrier complete 
1-4 interest in Manure Spreader, 2 Horses, Set Double Harness^- 

2 Sets Cart Harness, set Single Harness, 7 Cows, 7 small Pigs, 

3 Sows, 5 tons Hay, 3 tons Straw, 500 bus. Oats, 650 busrCorn, 
lot small Tools, Plows and other Farm Implements j also lot of 
Household Furniture, Carpets, etc, etc. 



THURSDAY FEBRUARY 7. 1918, 



m w 

County News Itemk 



Interesting Facts Gathered During* the Week by i>vr 
Regular Correspondents. 




♦ FLICKERTOWN. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mrs. Stella Gaines has measles 

Harry Passons is visiting in this 
neighl>orhood. 

Mrs. Sarah Whit:- end Mrs Jaa 
Burns are sick. 

Lewis Hensle y has moved to 
Mrs. E L Grant's farm. 

Cam White, and family were the 
Sunday quests at Chas. White's 

J. ft. Snyder and family were 
Sunday guests at J. W. White's 

Leslie Sebree and family were 
guests at F. M Voshell's, Sundav 



♦ IDLE WILD. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦a* 

W. T Berkshire is convalescing 
from an attack of measles. 

Miss Clara Seikman was a re- 
cent guest of her sister, Mrs. L^ 
C. Scothorn 

Miss Maud Norman Anbury is at 
home from Lexington for a much 
needed vacation. 

Mr. and Mrs Herbert Grant 
spent last Sunday with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs Homer Grant 

The thermometer was eight i>e~ 
low zero last Monday morning, 



<io.tr«^«i •«/ :r.~"-r-'*» ««»«■*:■. »«™ «*.iw u» xuuuuay morning, 

?>everai o, our citizens went to a drop of 42 degrees in 2! hours 



Petersburg last Sundav to see the 
river 



A horse belonging to Ernest 
Brown diod last Sunday morning, 



TERMS OF SALE. 



Sums of $5.00 and under, cash; on sums over 
$5.00 a credit of six months will be given, pur- 
chaser to give note with approved security, nego- 
tiable and payable in the Boone County Deposit 
Bank, Burlington, Kentucky. 

Other terms and conditions made known on day of sale. & 

JOHN \A/. CLORE, 

Administrator of the Estate of Charles E. Clore, Deceased. 

Clore C& Clayton, Attorneys E. C. RILEY, Auctioneer. 

403 Bell Block, Cincinnati, O. 




Indiana Motor Truck. 



i 



** 



UOUISVIUL-B 

COURIER-JOURNAL 

Daily by Mail 

(Not Sunday) 
—AND— 

THE RECORDER 

Your Home Paper and the Best Known Daily 
Newspaper of This Section. 



An Excellent Combination. 



L 



Subscription orders at this combined rate may be 
tent to the Boone County Recorder, Burlington, Ky. 



A. <J. SCOTT lias purchased an Indiana Motor Track, and 

is agent, for same in Boone County. If you desire a flr*t- 
rlasa truck-, fall 

A. C. SCOTT, Florence, Ky. 

Consolidated and Farmers Phones. 

For Sale— $ tou International Truck in good condition- 
will sell reasonable if sold at. once. 
Both Phones, A. C. SCOTT, Florence, Ky. 




m 
I 

it 

*•/ 
ft 

O 



ih 



FOR SALE. 



High grade llulsteiti Heifer «aH three weeks old; dam a tirst- 
claas grade cow, tin i reentered bull ; good sue and nicely mark- 
ed, $15 if taken at once. Also several registered bull valvei and 
two now- and pigs. HUBEKT CONNER. Hebron, Ky 



III 

THE FARMER'S NURSERY COMPANY 

ESTABLISHED IN 1864. INCORPORATED 1890 

Capital $200,000.00. 1200 acres in Cultivation 

TO THE FARMERS AND FRUIT GROWERS: 

It will pay you to take advantage of the following low- 
prices for 
* HIGH GRADE NURSERY STOCK 

Save the big expense and commission of the traveling sales- 
man. Buy direct from us and you save all this extra exr 
pense. We grow everything in the nursery line such as 
Grapes, Blackberries, Raspberries, Strawberries, Shrubs, 
Roses, &c. Where parties are unknown to us half the 
amount must accompany the order. 4 

APPI,E TREES Vj. 

3 to 4 feet, $15.00 per 100 4 to 5 feet. $20.00 per 100 

5 to 7 feet, $25.00 per 100 

PEAR TREES 

, 3 to 4 feet, $20.00 per 100 4 to 5 feet, $25.00 per 100 

5 to 7 feet, $30.00 per 100 

CHERRY TREES 

i 3 to 4 feet, *35lO0 per 100 4 to 5 feet, $40.00 per 100 

PLUM TREES 
i 3 to 4 feet, $30.00 per J00 4 to 5 feet, $40.00 per 100 

PEACH TREES 
2 to 3 feet, $10.00 per 100 3 to 4 feet.. $15.00 per 100 

4 to 5 feet, $20.00 per 100 5 to t> feet, $25.00 per 100 
50 Trees at 100 rates. Less than 50 trees add 5c per tree 

Nothidg will pay you as well as fruit raising for years 
to come. State where you wish trees shipped. Catalogue 
for the atdcidjr. Mail your orders now t<» 

H. C. DIMS, State Maiitr, Pbom 72. WALTON. ICY 



.-. tt i i • "*•'• m... «a iasi ,iuinui> morning, 

ueo. Hensley and family visited and a sce.md i» not expected to 

in Petersburg last Sunday after- live. 

no ?, n : , „ ' Young lambs are quite numer- 

Aiue u rant, of Camp Taylor, ous and causing much anxietvand 

was at home on a furlough last loss of sleep on the part of "their 

week: owners. 

Mrs. Ben) Snow and children 1 The many friends of Mrs J - J 

are guests of her parents, Mr. u ml . Ferris regret very much to learn 
t?A: C Pl %K' of hpr death which occurred last 

If the ground hog is an earl. Saturday in Florida, wh-re she 

riser he surely did .see his shad- had gone for the winter 

ow, last Saturday. ^, ■ 

Ira Ryle to avoid measles which • UNION 
?re prevalent at BeUeview. I * Uiy J 
— | eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee 

Moo»M«M«»«««««o»M«s; Mrs. Anna Coleman Lassing en- 
l — ~ T ~ nn«»/,n ,r^r -- ♦~U* iI ' e d_Jnto Eternal fiea^_ i>ecem- 

• GUNPOWDER. ♦jber Uth, Ifil7. In the^dea\hoV 

* ♦ i this beloved member of the La- 

B.V n7 u*'*V********** ' d , ies ' , Soc i et y of the Presbyterian 
Bert Clore bought a horse of church, the society has lost a 
ubert McMullen last week. The t&ithful and loval member. She 



price was a long one. 

Robert Snyder and family and 
B. A Rouse and family visited at 
J. W Rouse's last Friday 

Geo. Miller sent a load of hogs 
to market last week and the price 
received was satisfactory. 

James Tanner moved to Erlan- 
ger, last week, and Arthur Tanner 
moved to his place near. Hope- 

Ulad to h?ar from Bro. PhiHip, 
of Alexandria, Ind.. an item from 
the Hoosier State is always ap- 
preciated. r 

Bert Clore and wife had as 
guests Saturday night and Sun- 
day his mother and Clyde ana 
Neal Clements. 

A disease of some kind has 
broken out among the dogs here. 
Some have died while others seem 
to be on the road to recovery. 

The ground hog had a good op- 
portunity to see his shadow lasc 
Saturday. We hope he will favor 
us with a better quality of 
weather than we have been "hav- 
ing. 



DEVON. 



The young folks have been on 
joying a good time coasting. 

Mrs. Blanche Bagby has return- 
ed after a pleasant visit in the 
city. 

C. D, Carpenter and iamilv Sun 
dayed at Ren Cleek's at Kensing- 
ton. v ■ 

Henry Carpenter and James W. 
Bristow were guests of Eli Car- 
penter, Thursday. 

The ground hog surely saw his 
shdaow bur we hope hv will send 
us better weather. 

Miss?s Anna and Virginia Nor- 
man were guests of Mrs. Jane B 
Miller, Sunday night. 

Mrs. Ben Norman visited her 
daughter ">•<». Romine, of Coving- 
ton, two days last week. 

The Red Cross met at Beech 

j OVe . on Frida y afternoon at 3 
o clock Let as many be present 
as health and the weather will 
permit. 

Charles Cody and familv had as 
guests, Sunday, Mr. and Mrs. Wm 
McClurar and children. Elmer Sur- 
face, wife -and baby and .Joseph 
Groger and familv. 



had labored with them for i 
was ever ready to aid and coun- 
sel, and a liberal contributor to 
all the activities in which thev 
engaged. Her influence will long 
be felt in her society, her com- 
munity and her church. 

"She being dead yet speaketh.'- 
To her family they extend their 
love and sympathy, knowing "She 

has j3nly_dapartedL_to be witiv^ 

Christ." They have resolved 
that this tribute of love and 
appreciation of her long and well 
spent life be sent toiler family, 
a copy spread upon the minutes 
of the society and a copy to the 
Boone County Recorder. 

Miss Mattie Bristow. 
Mrs. William Spears 

Mrs. J T, Bristow was sick a 
few days last week. 

Linnie Love and familv spent 
Sunday at J. C Love's." 

Charles 'Hedges and wife, of 
Union, (spent Sunday with Har- 
vey Sen our. 

P. A Weaver and wife and Lou 
Clarkson and wife spent Sundav 
at Tommie Stephens.' 

Cecil Presser was at home on a 
furlough last Saturday and Sun- 
day from Camp Taylor. 

Manv of our people went to 
Hamilton, last Sunday, to take a 
look at tho river which thev 
could not see for the ice. 



Henry Afterkirk and his charm 
ing young, bride were guests of 
his 'parents Saturday and Sun- 
dav. 






FLORENCE. 



♦ 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦"♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
♦ CONSTANCE I 

♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Mrs. Sadie Ingram, wife of 'Al- 
bert Ingram, who died at her 
home in Riverside, Ohio, was 38 
years old and the daughter of B. 
F. Zimrner and Louisa Fox Zim- 
nj~" St° leaves to Kiourn her 
death a husband, six children, a 
father, three brothers and four 
sisters. Mrs Zimmer was born and 
reared in Constance and this writ 
er knew her all her life. She was 
a faithful, loving wife and mother 
and a true friend. A friend, 
whom we all wilt miss has gone, 
but our loss is her gain. 

Constance is the mecca for sight 
seers for miles around. The ice 
gorge is a wonderful display of 
nature's power and work. The 
oldest inhabitant never saw the 
river in anything like its present 
condition. 

Captain Koftnyer expects to lose 
«i» JPi-tire ferry outfit as they 



c.oai 1S a luxury in Florence, i arl fW ;« Tu y • xt a8 xney 
Mrs. L E Thompson has tonsil- f KL5 ft • f ce ' ?° one evet 

is. knew the river to be bl6cked 



itis. 

The sick in this community are 
improving. 

Mrs. Walter Arnold was a guest 
at G. W ElUston's recently. 

Miss Hazel Royer was the week's 
end guest of friends in Coving- 
ton, y S 

A horse belongingt o A. D Hun- 
ter, of Hebron, came very near 
dying here last Friday. 

The Red Cross is meeting twice 
a week with its members to work 
and every member is expectedto 
do her bit. 

I wish to say it wasth&Flor- 
ence Improvement Club instead of 
the Crescendo Club that paid 
for one street light. 

News has been received hen* 
of the death of Mrs. Anna Crig- 
£ r at _ the home of her daughter, 
Mrs. F\ T, Mitchell, of Hartweli; 
Ohio. She leaves two daughters 
and one son to mourn her 
death. 



when at a 62 foot stas 



♦ ♦ 

♦ BIG BONE. ♦ 

♦ ♦ 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

Between 15 and 20 'sled loads of 
people passed here Sunday, en- 
route to the river at Hamilton trf 
take a look at the ice gorge in 
the river at that place. 

Preaching at the M. E church 
Sunday by the pastor, Rev. Hall 

Mr. and Mrs H P. Jones spent 
last Thursday at Lee Miller's. 

Several ol our growers had to- 
bacco on the loose leaf market 
at Wilton last Saturday, and ro- 
' port £ood prices. 



Revs Edgar C Riley and R H. 
Cartel* left Burlinrton Tuesday af- 
ternoon to hoof u to Petoraburff. 
Rev. Riley left his machine -itand 
tng on tho side of the street in 
Burlington. You know it is p'ril- 
oua autoing ub--ii Mr Hil.y would 
rather w ilk t. i, mile* thuu 



to drive bin mat htm 
distance. 

N«»xt Thund,t\ k« S 
Day, and < 
Its flr«« hiUf. 



«r 



trv 

tho 



. tM-'H 

Will rtiiihr, 



Tlie Anderson Perry boat, Boone 
No. 5, was destroyed by the ice 
last week, the raachJhWy being 
saved. It had been in use for 
many years and had rendered 
good aerviee. Having about done 
its part, its owner, Capt. Henrv 
hotmyer, had begun n«aemb)ylng 
material with which to build a 
new boat some time since, and it 
will not bo long before he ha*, 
a new craft in coiumiaaiou. 

»V . it Morton from down on 
Gunpowder wua a ' ii-iiumib \initor 
to liurlington laat Ttweday, and 
while in town called at thla of- 
ties and enlisted as one of th» 
W a eord ai'a army of rsedera. 



■aami 



MaW 



^»- — ■— 






I— ■ 



■M 



- ■ 



#. 



\ 



— wrmmsr^AT Tmrnxr a r y t. wi». 






•. . .- 4MHM 




LIVE 

^j (J ^^lA 



PROPER SELECTION OF SIRE 



ACTUAL COST OF SHEEP CARE 

Hard to Figure in Dollars and Cents 

Labor Required — Much Depends 

on Equipment. 



One of First Considerations in Breed- 
ing of Livestock — Pure Bred 
Gives Best Results. 



One of tin.' first considerations in the 
breeding of livestock Is the selection 
of the proper sire. The influence of 
the sire is pre-eminent because he di- 
rectly ftffectfl it greater number of off- 
spring than does the single female. 
There can he no improvement or grad- 
ing-up process by the use of scruh 
aire*. Horse breeders should recog- 
nize the fact that it is not a paying 
iirojiositioii simply to breed mnres to 
nny stallion that may he available. A 
sound, pun-bred stallion should be 
►est results are to be <>b 



elected should con- 
as possible to the 



The actual value in dollars and cent' 
Of the labor r equired in the care of a 
flock of Sheep and bimbs for any given 
p,-r|od is hard to limine. Much de- 
pends on one's e qu i pment and its 
adaptability to sheep. The value of 
the manure mu*1 be taken into con- 
sideration. a« also must Ihe Use of 
fnrru work during the month Just be- useu - ;f u u . 
fore pasture coves in. tained. 

gammer pasture for sheep is worth The stallion i 
nbotit -"> cents per lead per month.' torn) as closely 
Two lambs are con>idered to average iireed and type of the mares that are 
the equal of one sheep during the pas- t o i„. bred. Stallions of pure breeding 
ture season, one-lift h of the wool nnd al e. by virtue ^if their unmixed BU- 
one-flfth of the lambs would be rea- eestry. possessed of greater prepo- 
tlie care of the tiock tency than are grades or scrubs, nnd 
will therefore invariably Impress their 
offspring with their breed character- 
I sties and individual merit. 

A low service fee Is too often the 
deciding factor with many farmers 
and mare owners in the selection of 
a sire. A low service fee ought never 
to be a temptation, but rather should 
be taken as a warning. A low fee Is 
usually a sign of an Inferior stallion. 
Colts from inferior or scrub sires will 
pell for much less than those sired 
by the sound, pure-bred stallion. 



Honable p;:y lor 




SALT ESSENTIAL FOR SHEEP 



Fine for Wool and Mutton. 




il f^rf-\\%4^*4 M* &*<***'%'' Ff *f thla *prt*V " «» not so much the 
The famous velf ThS# WNWifV l x - ° ml«Sb#*»nA opportunity 



GOOD HOMEMADE MILK STOOL j GOOD HOMEMADE MILK STOOL 



Device Intended to Hold Pail and 

Provide Seat for Milker Made 

Out of Fork Handle. 



A homemade l Uk stool, servlnfi^to- — A~huuiciuade milk atoot serving to 



hold I he pail ai, i proVlde a seat for 
the milker is made out of an old fork 
handle and an inch hoard 12 Incbcs 
wide and li feet long. 

To make tin 4 stool cut a board 1 feet 
long and 1 foot wide. With a draw- 
shave taper It to inches wide at one 
end. Two cleats, each 4 Inches by 
Inches, are fastened crosswise of the 
graiu at the narrow end to prevent 
splitting of the board. With an ex- 
pansive bit or bridge auger, drill three 
holes in which to insert the legs. Tin- 
two front legs are cut from an old 
fork handle, and hold Uie pall pliu- 



' Particulars of Interesting Experiment 

Conducted in France — Mineral 

of Big Value. 

The value of salt for sheep Is not 
as fully realized as It should be, and 
tbe particulars of nn experiment con- 
ducted tn Frrmcp-yoroe y ears -ago p ro- - 
vldes interesting information! 

Three lots of sheep were fed on hay, 

, .; ! straw, potatoes nnd beans for 134 day9. 
and its pasture. The portion of the, Qnp ^ ^ ~ ^ onf? ]ot OIM ,. lialr 

wool paying for the shearing and care j m]noe ^ djiV nn<| the ( „ m . r , ot 

for the month preceding pasture. With , tnrec . fourths ounce each duilv . Tho! , e 

five-sixths of the ewes rearing twins, ^ ^ on(J . nnlf ouno „ g . lin<H , 414 

.we have 183 per cent Increase. That ■ ]s more than tnQae thflt ha( , m 

is a very good lamb crop and a bfthl sfllt> an(] ^ poun(]s mf)re {han tm)Se 

of them will pay for summer pasture; that , md three . fourtns 0UIK . e . The 

of the flock. I ^pp that hHd Kalt cur 1% |)0Unt i s 



COLTS PAY FOR HORSE WORK 



Fine Points of Farm Management Illus- 
trated by South Dakota Farmer — 
Uses Mares. 

.(By W. A. OSTRANDER. South Dakota 
State College.) 
A farmer in Spink county, South Da- 
kota, was shown last spring that he 
should get his horse work done cheap- 
er in order to make his farm pay bet- 
ter. 



1 more wool, and a better fleece than 
those that had no salt, and showed 
much better results in both quality and 
texture in the wool. 



MULE AND HORSE SHORTAGE 



War Demand and Few Number of 

Animals Bred Are Bound to Bring 

About Higher Prices. 



(Clemsoa College Bulletin.) 
More than a million horses and 
So be sold two gelding?, aged | mules of the United States have been 
seven years old, for $4">0, aud bought used for military purposes in connec- 
two mares of about the same age and I tlon with the Kuropean war during the 
quality for $4U. r », which raised two the last 18 months— -that is about one 



I- 



■IZ n 



36* 



fen- -I ** * 



tf* 



gyg; l\ 



Device Intended to Hold Pall and 

Provide Seat for Milker Made 

Out of Fork Handle. 



bold the pail and provide a seat for 
the milker Is made out of an old fork 
handle and an Inch board 12 Inches 
wide and 3 feet long. 

To make the stool cut a board 2 feet 
long and 1 foot wide. With a draw- 
shave taper It to C Inches wide at one 
end. Two cleats, each 4 Inches by 6 
inches, are fastened crosswise of the 
grain at the narrow end to prevent 
splitting of the board. With an ex- 
pansive bit or bridge auger, drill three 
holes in which to insert the legs. The 
two front legs are cut from an old 
fork handle, and hold the pail plat- 




Homemade Milk Stool. 



colts. Ou analyzing his business, we 
found lhat his horse work cost him 
practically nothing for 1916, The colts 
paid the bill. This fact is convincing 
his neighbors that there is something 
in the liner points of farm manage- 
ment. 



GOOD AND INFERIOR HORSES 



Careful Consideration Should Be Given 
to Sires at Present Time — Differ- 
ence in Price. 

There has never been a time when 
the sires to which mares are to be 
bred should be mere carefully con- 
sidered thun the present year. The 
last five years have seen u gradually 
increasing difference between the 
price of gyod and of Inferior hor.-es. 
During the last year those horses 
and mules which were good enough 
to do some Job well have found ready 
sale, while others have been a drug 
on the market, and have lost money 
for the men who produced them. 



horse to every 20 In the country. For 
some time before the European war 
prices had sagged until breeders had 
barely more than f>0 per cent of their 
mares mated. The war demand and 
the few Dumber of animals bred are 
bound to bring about high prices for ; 
horses and mules, not only during the 
war but for several years after. 

There are probably 20.000 mares on 
South Carollnu farms, and only 2,000 
to 3.000 of these are regularly produc- 
ing foals. At least 12,000 of these 
mares should be regularly foaling. 



form 4 Inches above the floor. The 
back leg Is driven through leaving tbe 
pail platform level with the floor, nnd 
projecting above to support the sent 
nt a height convenient for th* milker. 
A <ross piece C Inches by 12 Inches 
starves as a sent, and is secured on 
top of the back leg with a wood screw. 

This stool removes the weight of 
the pall from the milker's knees., yet 
supports It In the same position." If 
the cow should want to kick, the milk- 
er can shift all the weight to the back 
leg, anil swing the pail from beneath 
the animal. 

Materials required :' First, fork han- 
dle cut as follows: One piece, 15 
Inches : - pieces, each, 4 Inches. Sec- 
ond, inch board 3 feet by 1 foot Cut 
as follows : One piece, 12 by 24 Inches; 
2 pieces, each, 4 by luches; 1 piece. 
by 12 inches— Hoard's Dairyman. 



f_a»— » ,i36 T 






ffz^~~ 



-1 



-•*- — 



J, 



The itv>re common gocret of want of 
succenH iu-JU/e Is a tendency to let 




Homemade Milk Stool. 

form 4 inches above the floor. The 
back leg Is driven through leaving the 
pall platform level with the floor, and 
projecting above to support the seat 
at a height convenient for the milker. 
A cross piece inches by 12 Inches 
serves as a seat, and Is secured on 
top of the back leg with a wood screw. 

This .stool removes the weight of 
the pail from the milker's knees., yet 
supports it In the same position. If, 
the cow should want to kick, the milk- 
er can shift ail the weight, to the back 
leg, and swing the pail from beneath 
the animal. 

Materials required: First, fork han- 
dle cut us follows: One piece, 15 
Inches; 2 pieces, each, 4 inches. Sec- 
ond, inch board 8 feet by 1 foot cut 
as follows : Qne piece, 12 by 24 Inches ; 
2 pieces, each, 4 by G Inches; 1 piece, 
by 12 Inches.— Hoard's Dairyman, 



Many n common dish is changed Into 
a most tasty one by the addition of a 
few marshmnllows. Drop 
in the cut-up marshmal- 
lows while beating the 
icing for the cake; they 
will melt entirely If fresh 
a # nd make most delicious 
frosting. To make pud- 
ding sauces melt them in 
a little, grape Juice If the 
sauce is to be served with a fig or 
plum pudding, a little vanilla if used 
with prune or date or with ginger- 
bread. 

Cream pie. chocolate pie or custard 
is made quite elegunt by decorating 
the top with quartered or whole marsh- 
mallows Just before putting on the 
meringue. 

An apple pie made of thickened 
apple sauce covered with marshmnl- 
lows Instead of a meringue Is hoth 
delicious apd pleasing to the eye. The 
pie should be set In the oven to puff 
and brown the mallows before serving. 
Fudge, cream candy and boiled 
Icing stay tuolsf longer and are cream- 
ier if luarshmallows are added to 
them. 

In any candy they may be dropped 
In and stirred until dissolved while 
the candy Is cooking. 

Delightful marguerites ore mode by 
putting n marshmnllow, dented In the 
center, where a bit of butter, a nnt 
or a bit of dried fruit may be placed, 
nil on a round cracker, browned In 
the oven. 

When serving children cocoa, a 
marshinullow pleases them better than 
cream for a garnish to the cup of 
cocoa or chocolate. 

A boiled custurd Is Improved by 
adding a handfut of marshmnllows to 
the custard when cooking. • 

< llngci'breud cut in -squares while 
hot with u fork, the pieces broken 
open und a ninrshmallow placed sand- 
wich fashion in each, theu set Id the 
oven to melt, served s with whipped 
cream and a cup of tea. makes a most 
delectable cake for an afternoon tea. 
Dates and prunes stuffed with 
marshniallows add variety. Mixed 
with various fruits, a hit of salted 
dressing and whipped cream, makes 
a salad hard to equal for dellclous- 
ness. 

ri s • THE \ 

KITCHEN 
CABINET 

A luxury Is a thing we can do with- 
out; u necessity Is a thing we must 
have. The luxuries of our grandmoth- 
er's time have become the necessities 
of the day. 



or the com- 
mitting one blunder, as the lavish 
Jj* waste .-of ull» forces— opportunities 
n 'vlilc tO" s%Knts7Bhai>es come within 
tfaV" jtYSsp. ^*Tf- -ti' the slovenliness of 
men und women which for the most 
pnrt.ruifUp tbjglr lives so unsatisfac- 
tory. 




BIG MONEY FROM PUREBREDS • BIG MONEY FROM PUREBREDS 



Interesting Comparison Made by Illi- 
nois Agricultural College on 
Dairy Profits. 



A comparison of the yearly Incomes 
of 124 farms where purebred bulls 
were kept at the heud of the dairy 
herd, with 400 dairy farms where a 
grade bull was used, has been made by 
I the Illinois Agricultural- college. 



To forestall the shortage and high) The average farm Income for the 
prices as much as possible, the logical j first list of farms was $1,102 after do- 
thing 10 do Is to put every mare to' ducting taxes, interest on Investment. 

etc. Where a grade bull was used the 
farm Jncome was $734. On 83 farms 
where scrub hulls were used the farm 
Income was only $243, or only half 
enough to pay interest on the invest- 
ment, to say nothing about any pay for 
the owner's time. 



PROPER EXERCISE FOR BULL 



Keep Him in ( Separate Paddock Where 
He Will Always Be Under Con- 
trol, Is Safe Plan. 

When you have made your pur- 
chase of a good baby beef sire, don't , 
keep him shut up without exc-cise, j 
end by all means do not underfeed ! 
him. More bulls are spoiled by un- ' 
derfeeding and lack of exercise than 
by overfeeding, but In seeking to have 
your bull get plenty of exercise don't 
let him run with tbe cows. Keep hlra 
in a sepurute paddock where you will 
always hnve liim under proper control. 
It's the safe and the economical plan 
to follow. 






GOOD THING8. 

When making fudge and It Is almost 
xendy to turn out, set the pan In hot 
water to keep it 
from hardening 
and spread be- 
tween graham 
crackers, put therm 
back in the box *o> 
they will harden 
In the right shape. 
Snuggle Pud- 
ding. — Hollow out 
little cup cukes, those made of sponge 
cake mixture are best ; rill with the 
following: Rub three cupfuls of prune 
pulp through a colander, add a table- 
spoonful of gelatin dissolved in two 
cupfuls of boiling water, sugar to 
taste, a dash of lemon Juice and one 
cupful of whipped cream folded in. 
Set In u cool place to harden and do 
not put into the cakes until it begins 
to sot. Do not throw away the wa- 
ter In which the hamboue was cooked, 
save It to flavor uavy beans when 
cooking instead of water, the remain- 
der may be used to cook the cabbage 
for some meal, giving It a fine sea- 
soning. 

Small bits of ham too smull to be 
used in other ways, may be ground 
and mixed with various seasoning)*; 
mustard among them aud used aa 
sandwich tilling, or add to a white 
sauce or to an omelet, not even a ta- 
blespoonful should be wasted. 

Cauliflower With Onion Sauce.— 
Boil the cauliflower and place In a 
dish which may be put into the oven 
and used as « serving dish. Add one 
cupful of boiled onion, put through a 
sieve, to a cupful of cream, heat and 
seusonwlth shit aud pepper then stir 
In the yolk_oi__an egg well beaten^ 
Pour over the cauliflower, sprinkle 
with rourth-lnch cubes of bread 
browned In butter and serve very hot. 
Onion* Stuffed With Sausage.— Par- 
boll good-sized onions until brown, 
changing the water If the vegetable 
la very strong. Drain nnd remove the; 
centers, flU with pork sausage, round* 
ing the top. Bake about an hour bast- 
ing four or five times with the drip- 
ping in the pan. Serve without sauce" 
if with chops or turkey. 

And the finest fellow of all would 
be the one who could be g;lad to have 
lived because the world was chiefly 
miserable, and his life had come to 

• help some one who needed It.— George 

: Elliot. 



WHOLESOME DISHES. 



When roasting mutton, lamb, or in 

fact any goo.l-sl/.ed cut of meat. If one 

uses a sharp knife, 

makln 




Interesting Comparison Made by Illi- 
nois Agricultural College on 
Dairy Profits. 

A comparison of the yearly Incomes 
of 124 farms where purebred bulls 
were kept at the heud of the dairy 
herd, with 4*56 dairy farms where a 
grade bull wns used, has been made by 
the Illinois Agricultural college. 

The average farm income for the 
first list of farms wns $1,102 after de- 
ducting taxes. Interest on Investment, 
etc. Where a grade bull was used the 
farm Income was $f34. On 811 farms 
where scrnb bulla were used the farm 
Income was only $243, or only half 

enough to pay interest on the Invest-] a teaspoonful of salt. 
meat, to say nothing about any pay for 



soft pock- 
ets to Insert bits of 
fat, onion, garlic, 
pepper, or other 
seasoning, the meat 
will be much bet- 
ter seasoned thnn 
with the usual all- 
over method which 
Is too apt to overseason the gravy. 
Corn Chowder. — Take an Inch thick 
slice of fat salt pork, und one small 
onion, one and u half cupfuls of corn, 
one aud a fourth cupfuls of sliced po- 
tatoes, a fourth of a teaspoonful of 
pepper, one and a half cupfuls of hot 
milk, two tablespoonfnls of butter nnd 




GOOD THINGS OLD AND NEW. 




HANDY COVERED MILK PAILS 



More Important in Dirty Stable Than 

in Clean One — Wire Gauze Is 

Sometimes Used. 

Covered milk pails are more neces- 
sary in a dirty thsin in a clean stable. 
Such palls are designed to reduce the 
size of the opening and thereby ex- 
pose less milk to the air and the dust, 
raising colts. The average farmer lsi In some cases, luyers of cotton nnd 
not advised to replace all of his work! wire gauze are placed over the small- 



the owner's time. 



HANDY COVERED MILK PAILS 



mules with horses, but a sufficient 
number should be kept to raise animals 
to replace worn-out work stock. 

Above all, breed to big strong-boned 
Jacks and registered draft stallions of 
pure breeding, sound und of acceptable 
weight. 



CORRECT COLLAR FOR HORSE 

•tyles Ar# Created Mostly by Use of 

Different Materials— Metal la 

Not Much Used. 

The Style* of horse collars are cr** 
aled mostly bj ihe use of dltrsrant 
kinds of mtterlnh la taelr toastrue- 
tlon. Such msicriaU as hcuv) duck, 
tU*laf and leather «r« utted ell her 
abms or to vnrlou* combinations, Alt- 
ipetal collars uaf *'<*> he btugst, but 
mutM wMh aaad. 



FARROWING HOUSE FOR SOWS 

Building Usually Preferred Is On« 

With Pens on Each Side and 

Alley in Middle. 

Thera are two kinds of fam/wing 
houses— (he Stationary und the port 
able. A breeder uefds both If h« baa 
from 15 to 20 brood \tows farrowing 
about the same time. r a e kind of far- 
rowing boose usually preferred Is ana 
with pens ah each Hid* with s four 
toil hallway through the middle, with 
plenty of light nttd no dlrtcl drsft. 
The dsm Ntiouid be st least 10 by 13 
f'- 1 with a similar spacs on lbs uat> 
side for the sow to ngrctna. 



lopped pall. 
Careful trials 



have demonstrated 



More Important in Dirty Stable Than 

in Clean One — Wire Gauze la 

Sometimes Used. 

Covered rnilk palls ure more neces- 
sary In a dirty than In a dean stable. 
Such palls are designed to reduce the 
size of tbe opening and thereby ex- 
pose less milk to the air and the dust. 
In some cases, layers of cotton and 
wire gauze are placed over the small- 
topped pall. 

Careful trials' have demonstrated 



that 00 per cent less dirt and from 2f» | that 00 per cent less dirt nnd from 2fi 



to 00 per cent fewer bacteria get into 
the milk when covered milking palls 
are used. 



DAIRYING INDUSTRY IN WEST 

Small Farmer la More Dependent Up- 
on Sale of Products Than Many 
Are Ready to Admit 

No greater calamity could befall the 
farmers of the West than the destruc- 
tion of all places where cream or but 
ter could bo aold. The amali farmer 
In more dependent upon the sal«- of 
dairy products than many are willing 
to admit, The creiiin receiving 
t|on« ami the poHslblllty of coy ship 
iinoi to the creamery have for y«mrs 

b the mainstay for inauy wostaro 

funneii no I as such they will eonttuun 
to ha 



to 90 per cent fewer bacteria get Into 
the milk when covered milking palls 
are used. 



DAIRYING INDUSTRY IN WEST 

Small Farmer la More Dependent Up- 
on Sale of Products Than Many 
Are Ready to Admit. 

a 

No greater calamity could befall the 

fanners of the West tluin tho destruc- 
tion of nil places where crepm or but- 
ler could be sold. The small fanner 
Ih uioie dependent upon Ihe stilo of 
dairy products thun many are willing 
t„ mlmll The ' renin icelvlng Bta- 

tlous nnd the po*idldllty of easy ship 
nuiit to the cieiimcry have for f*9t* 
been the mainstay for ueny weatera 
farmers end as auch they will continue 
ta be 



In hits nnd cook In a frying pan until 
brown und all the fat Is tried out, 
add the onion and cook It until yel- 
low. Pour boiling water over Ihe po- 
tatoes and cook' Ave minutes, then 
drain. Pour a cupful aud a half of 
boiling water on the onion and pork 
and simmer 20 minutes, strain this 
water over the potatoes nnd cook until 
they are rroarly done, then add the 
corn, milk and butter with seasoning. 
Serve very hot with crackers that have 
been soaked in boiling water, then add- 
ed to the chowder. Codfish may be 
nsed In plnce-rff the corn, or in fact 
uny fresh cooked fish. 

Graham Cracker Cake. — Take oue 
nnd a fourth cupfuls of sugar, one 
nnd a half cupfuls of sour milk, two 
tubiespoonfuls of butter, two eggs, n 
teaspoonful of salt and the same of 
soda, with 32 graham crackers rolled 
very fine. Mix and bake in two lay- 
ers. Cse lemon lining. 

Chicken Croquettes.— Make nice, 
shapely cakes of well-seasoned 
mashed potato, <ook until brown In 
hot fat. Remove to a hot platter, 
make a deep depression In each, OU 
with ' hot minced and well seasoned 
chicken, sprlrikle with buttered bread 
crumbs or rlced egg yolks for u gar- 
nish. 

Holled rice with tomnto. chopped 
green pepper, a little onion added to 
a very kiiimII amount of meat, will 
make a uioit tilling main dish. Hake 
la 1 be os en until thoroughly healed 
ihMtigh. 



For the meatless day try this — 
Nut Filled Potato.— Bake until soft 
and mealy six good sized 
iHitatoes, prick them to 
let out the steam then 
cut in halves where they 
were pricked. With a 
sharp spoon scoop out 
the potato and turn it 
into a warm mixing bowl, 
mash and mix with 
cream, salt, butter, minced parsley, a 
little poultry seasoning and u cupful of 
nut meats that have been put through 
the meat chopper; beat with a fork 
until light and creamy then return, 
to the shells which after dusting with 
buttered crumbs are placed in the 
oven to brown. Serve with sprays of 
pnrsley. j 

Harvard Salad. — Dice sufficient crisp 
celery to fill two large cups, adding 
chopped radishes, six minced olives, 
one small cupful of chopped nut meats, 
two diced hard cooked eggs; blend 
the Ingredients well, moisten with may- 
onnaise dressing and arrange In nests 
of lettuce. Pour over a tnblespooo- 
ful of the dressing, garnish with tri- 
augles of beets and gruted egg yolk. 
Nut and Pecan Salad.— Souk half a 
pound of prunes overnight then cook 
until tender and the liquid is all ab- 
sorbed. When the prunes- are cold, 
cut the flesh from the stones In length- 
wise slices, pour over these three ta- 
lilespoonfuls of orange Juice or auy 
canned fruit Juice und set aside In a 
cool place. Cut up a cupful of pecan 
nut meat Into three or four pleceB each, 
add half a tenspoonfui of salt, three 
spoonfuls of olive oil and a (ablespooo- 
tul and a half of lemon juice, pour 
over the prunes aud nuts; mix well 
and add more seasoning If needed. 
Serve on crisp leaves of lettuce with 
roast of lamb. 

Cheese Canapes. — Cut slices from a 
loaf of whole wheat bread, stamp Id 
circles, toasting to a golden browu, 
butter lightly and spread with a cream 
cheese which hue been mashed to a 
pnatc with aalt, thick cream, half a 
cupful of chopped red puppara, caumd. 
Cover the toast with this and garni*!* 
each cauape with ring* out from stuffed 
olivet. 



r* 



■■ 



■ . 




»■ 



o 



I 



If 




COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vol. XXXXIII 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1918. 



$1.50 Per Year 



No 20 



• i 



WIDENING WOMEN'S SPHERE. 
Those women who have demanded 
an enlargement of their sphere lc 
order that they might be placed up<hi 
aa equality with men may realize their 
I ambition. Reports continue to come 
I in telling of the employment of wom- 
an to take the places of men who have 
answered the call to the colors. The 
latest to do tlUs Is a big express coin- 
jpany, which until recently never had 
[a woman In Its employ, says Washing- 
I ton Post. Three years ago, owing to 
the demand for men, this company be- 
,gan employing women stenographers, 
(and but a few days since the barn 
Jwere further let down and women bill 
iClerWa were given employment. In the 
! munitions works thousands of women 
'are doing men's v.\>rk at men's wages. 
In 



i«*. some of the large balldlugs girls 
are operating elevators in place of 
boys. One of the large railroad sys- 
tem Is considering the possibility of 
employing women as conductors pu 
passenger trains and as ticket and bag- 
Igage agents in the event that the short- 
age of labor reaches an acute stage. 
The war has resulted In very mate* 
( rially widening women's sphere and 
In opening up new lines of employ- 
Jment to them, and after they have 
(demonstrated their ability to do the 
'work men will have to mtfke up their 
.minds to compete with them when 

I times are again normal. 
I 

, There Is fine flavor of the past iibout 
ithe story of the young BrttlBh aviator 
Jwho, when bis German opponent's ma- 
ichlne gun Jammed, abandoned his own 
'and drew Ms pistol to finish the duet 
.la the air. The German flyer had no 
other weapon than his automatic, and 
[courtesy forbade the Britisher to tuke 
unfair advantage. So Chandos might 
have done, or BnyaroTor Maxiullluiu 
[in the days before the burdens of eiu- 
ipery blighted his proud spirit. Here 
| is true sportsmanship, for sportsman- 
abip Is only a latter day word 'for chi- 
valry, Bays Cleveland Plain Dealer. 
It is deeds like this which mitlgtnen 
the curse of war, and which, Indeed, 
Still lend to war that glamour which 
has always stirred the hearts of men. 
jFoudallsm was sordid enough In priu- 
iciple and practice, and the ages In 
iwhlcb It thrived were dark. 



, The alr-ruidlng activity continues; 
the spur Ids verienkt activity continues. 
If horrlbleness could win u world war 
•the Germans by this time would have 
•secured the award of victory. But 
wlule the Germans ure throwing bombs 
on civilians and dealing destruction to 
merchant vessels in defiance of the 
luws of war General Halg is forcing 
i back their line in the protracted bat- 
'tie of Flanders. The conquest of 
fighting forces by flchtrng forces is one 
of the things that count in war. . 



, One prolific cause of accidents in the 
streets and highways is that care Is 
■not exercised to preserve a margin for 
Buch accidents. Automobiles and oth- 
er vehicles maintain speed under the 
•assumption that pedestrians are going 
to get out of the way, and pedesttiuns 
'keep on nnder the assumption that the 
! vehicles will not run them down. With 
this margin observed on elthef side ac\ 
cidenta would decrease to a notable 
minimum. > 



CORN WILl WIN 

DEMOCRACY'S WAR 

America'a Greatest Ceral Crop 

la Now Moving to Market— 

Mainstay in Nation's Criais 

America's great corn crop, ex- 
ceeding three billion bushen* will 
aavvtu.) worlds food situation, of- 
ficials of tUai Lnited Jstaiesiuod 
administration believe. 

Com is the nation's best food ce- 
real, housewives are beginning to 
realize. Jt contains ail the- ele- 
ments needed to keep the body in 
a state of health and when,use<i 
a ccor di ng to the scores of tried rei 
eeipts, especially when combmv'O 
wiin an auded. portion of oilonat 
will abstain life unueiinitely. In- 
dian warriors m colonial days lived 
on parched corn atone for many 
days ut a time, and at Valley 
Forge parched corn was at times 
the sole ration of the Continental 
soldiers. 

Owing to v transportation diffi- 
culties caused by the war the corn 
ciop moved more slowly to market 
this year than-ever before. Now 
however, the cereal is reaching the 
millers and consumers. In the 
meantime the nation's purplus 
wheat has been sent to Prance. 

Today there are approximately 
30 bushels of corn for every Amer 
ican. This quantity is greater by 
five bushels than in former years. 

Corn has become the nation's 
muin9tay in the crisis of war. 

Just as this cereal saved the 
first American colonists from fa-, 
mine on many occasions, just as it 
served as a staple food during 

the War of the Revolution and 
during the Civil War, King Corn 
has again corns to the front in 
the nation's battle with auto- 
cracy. 

Corn meal is finding greatly in- 
creased use in tho making of or- 
dinary white bread. -Hund r e ds o f 
housewives and many of the lar- 
ger bakers are mixing twenty per 
cent, corn meal with wheat flour 
to make leavened bread. This flohr 
of a mixture is worked and bak- 
ed in the same recipes and with 
the same methods that apply 
straight wheat bread. 

Corn bread— using corn meal en- 
tirely—is gaining a greater popu- 
larity than ever before. House- 
wives mre coming to realize that 
every* pound of wheat saved in 
America means a pound of wheat 
released for shipment to the na- 
tions with which America is aasoe 
iated in the war. 

There are a score of corn pro-, 
ducts that today possess unusual 
importance for Americans. Corn 
syrirp for swpetening corn cakes* 
and buckwheat cakes and for use 
in tho kitchen instead of granu- 
lated sugar is one of the leading 
products made from corn. 

Corn oil, excellent for fry in* and 
for every other purpose filleci by 
salad oils, i<j appearing on the 
market in large quantities. it 
comes from the germ of the corn. 

THE OHIO APPROPRIATION. 

Lack of Wharfage Equipment Along 
River Should He Remedied. 
Tho Ohio River appropriate 



Beware of Garget in Ewes. 

Garget, or inflammation of the 
ewe's udder, is a common trouble 
at lambing time, and it should be 
given immediate attention. The 
udders of heavy milking ewes are 
likely to become inflamed and as 
a result tho ewes may have milk 
fever. Owerfeeding of grain, colds, 
chills and lying on wet floorstare 
some of the causes of this con- 
dition. When discotered, theewe's 
udder should be bathed with hot 
water by means oi' woolen cloths. 
After the udder has been dTied, 
it can be rubbed with turpentine; 
and lard, or with one-half ounce 
of lead acetate dissolved in one 
quart of water. The udder should 
be kept wet with acetate for half 
a day. It should be milke&out 
thoroughly each time the applica- 
tion is made. It is also advisable 
to give the ewe a good dose of 
Epsom salts as soon asth~ trouble 
is noticed. l 



RAD ROADS AND 

A DAD CROSSING 

Between Burlington and Flor- 
ence Causes Mail Truck Lots 
of Trouble. 



All Hands Busy. 

Plenty of work at the County 
Clerk's office now, tho big job of 
the year being on hand, the mak 
ing up of the assessor's book for 
the supervisors of tax, who meet 
the second Monday in March. The 
recapitaulation sheet will show an 
increase close to three million 
dojlars in the amount of taxable 
property in the county, the result 
of the new plan of assessing. The 
policy of the new revenue law is 
to let (nothing escape taxation, 
and the clerk is of the opinion 
that assessor Beemon and his de- 
puties combed the county closely. 

FORTY YEARS AGO TODAY 



to | 



Items Taken From the Issue of 
The Recorder of Febru- 
ary 14th, 1878 J 

The Pope of Rome di »d on the : 
1th inst. 

• • • • 

'1 be number of delinquent poll 
tax payers allowed the sheriff for ! 
laBt year is 699. 

• • • • 

Th^ grass in the court house '. 
yard has a springlike appearance. , 

• * • • 

Two sermons were preached in 
Belleview last Sunday mo-ning. ; 
the like never happened before. 

* • • » 

Th> sale of the personal prop-' 
e.-ty oi' the late Peter T. Cropper 
is advertised. 



The mail auto truck had trouble 
repeatedly at the Limaburg ford 
last week, and came in from one 
to two hours late several even- 
ings. Thursday evening the ma-t 
chine took water in the carbure- 
tor as it crossed the creek "and 
stopped about the time it got 
out of the water and could notj 
be induced to budge. Geo W 
*Eaker seeing -the machine was en 
tirely out of commission took his 
horses and sled and brought the 
mail and passengers on to Bur- 
lington. The Limaburg rescue par- 
ty rendered valuable assistance 
in getting the heavy truck to a 
position where it would not inter 
fere with travel. About the time 
the sled was ready to depart for 
Burlington Mr. Conrad had a relyf 
machine at the scene, having 
heard of the trouble by phone. 
This machine remained on the 
east side of the creek until ^Jje 
sled came to Burlington and re- 
turned with the afternoon's mail, 
which it took on to the city. 
Th" evening before the truck slid 
off the road in front of W. L 
KirkpatrickV residence when it 
tried to pass Charles West bays 
wagon which had been in trouble 
and abandoned' alt the roadside 
with a load of coaL A relief par- 
ty was organized in Burlington, 
and armed with shovels and oth- 
er necessary tools succceeded in 
getting the machine back on the 
pike after considerable work. De- 
livering the mail in Burlington 
this winter has been an awful 
job and Mr. Conrad has e 



In Old Kentucky. 

iNebraska State Journal.) 
A decent respect for the feel- 
ings of Henry Watterson bids us 
apeak (softly of the news from 
old Kentucky. These are hard 
times for old folks. The world 
is changing lik^ a clock in the 
hands oi an inquisitive boy. Noth- 
ing stays put. The props of the 
good old order of things, who 
viewed with alarm last year, now 
and the things they feared act-,, 
ually upon them 



RETIRED FARMERS WILL 
GO BACK TO WORK 

Experienced Men to Teach Lads 
Farming— Necessary in Na- 
tion's Food Drive. 

• 

The most acute problem before 

the world today is the problem 

of food. The most acute phase ot 

We see Social- tn <> to(H[ problem is the uuestioa 

fZ ,d rrl'rr" s»"«™ge fa J of getting sufficient and compel 
\ England , prohibition and a hun- » tent farm labo 

dred other things in America 



Youth, still piastic, can tend to 
these things and even enjoy them-- 
for the novelty so dear ;:o'youth. 
Those who have spent their lives 
building up this world have small 
reward in seeing their, work crum- 
ble under their feet. We owe 
them our deepest consideration. 

Here in old Kentucky, and hrne 
in old Kentucky is Henry Walter-* 
son. What has made Kentucky 
famous? Col. Watterson ,of course 
But Col. Watterson was con-ent to 
mak-? Kentucky famous only he- 
cause Kentucky stood for certain 
principles which seemed to him 
groat. In a day when many peo- 
ple outside of Kentucky still b?- 
lieved that there could be such a 
tlpng as good whisky- Col Wat- 
terson stood at the head of a 
Kentucky triumphantly unanimous 
in that opinion. The- name of Ken 
tucky has graced the labels on a 
large percentage of the whisky 
bottles America has ever drained. 
Towering in the midst of this 
achievement has stood Col. Wat- 
terson, himself no mean judge o 
goo* whisky, hashing anathemas 
at th» prohibitionist and the 
puritan destructively any tyran- 
ically bent on taking the "tuck" 
out oi' Kentucky. 

The Kentucky Legislature has 
1e national prohibition 



winter, it behyg impossible for 
him to make his schedule one- 
fourth of the time. but the 
worse conditions the closer he has 
stuck to the job be it said in 
his paise. 



Without doubt 
the outcome »f the war will hinge 
largely on the ability of the Amer 
ican farmer to produce more food 
for the soldier and civilian popu* 
lation of this country and for 
our allies. This cannot be done 
without expending more labor on 
[arm crops and stock during the 
l coming season than was expend- 
ed during the paat season. Even 
before this country entered the 
war there was a serious shortage 
of fa-m labor. Later, the draft 
look a portion of the labor sup-4 
ply and no doubt will make— fur— 
tli • inroads in the future. If 
t h i s shortage o f lab or is to be 
met it will be done by the earnest 
and intelligent effort of farm pro 
prietors and their employes who 
will not only have to work har- 
der but more efficiently than ev- 
er lie fore. Horses and farm ma*, 
chinery must also be utilized to 
their maximum efficiency. 

In times of national < -isi» 
American citizens have always 
arisen to the occasion. Both city 
- _man. -and farmers will exert their 
full energies to bring the war to 
a successful issue. One valuable 
help in solving the fam labor 
problem is furnished by the pa*~ 
triotic service of men of advanc- 
ed years who before the war 
had begun to shift their bur- 
dens to younger shoulders. It is 



- , ■ — ..-.. .. >• * , - „ — . , — r , , . , ----- inruo in yuuuxer »nt>uiaers, n is 

great deal more money than he amendment Kentucky which has estimated that there are a miU 

uill reeeive for it. lfenas T>een **n to whisky what Nebraska is i ion retired, farmers, in the U. S 

fighting the snow and sleet all to corn, what Kansas is to pol-i who are F X bte ^ rfoiwr farm " 



Swat the Gossip Monger. 



Satisfaction is to be 
tho sharp treatment 



fountl in 

Of g"_>S.'-,i'p 



capable of doing farm: 
itics what Indiana is to poe;s; wo , k . There are also miMona of 
Kentucky allows only Mississippi village lads ^ theip t ^ fc 

a " d », K-V-* ima to . h&a \ lt to the under proper direction, can ren-I 
prohibition amendment. der efficient service on our farms. 

A. nation that loves him will Pa9t experience shows thatthese* 
hope this blow does not bring , boy8 aw> » UMat isfactory as farm' 

< labouers because they lack that 
experience and skill which are 
obtained only by months or yeara I 
of observation and every day 
practice on the farm. 



this blow 
Marse Henry's 

row to the grave. Let him be 
comforted by the company he is 
in. Noah had to witness the drown 
ing of the world in order that 
creation might back up and make 



'"V"? 3 , 1 " 8 who . a: * e raembeis of high a fresh start. We 



K, 



night. 



* ♦ ♦ * 
thu nd er last 



Saturday 



A. \V Smith has 
stoiv to Dr. Kiffe. 



sold his drug 
of Cfliviharton 



Exit the Sectional Lines. 



When this war is over 
cans will know one another 
ter. and lingering sectional 



offilhll or social circles. There h;.s 
just been purged out of the 
American Defense Societv a mem- 
ber of the Executive Committee 
who was responsible for the un- 
founded »story thai l\vo ships 
laden with millions of cartridges 
for the German enemv had re- 
cently been permitted to clear 
from New York. The Federal 
Orand Jury of that district found 
that the loose-lipped committee- 
man could not substantiate' the 
mischievous tale, and forced the 
admission that he had merely 
Ameri- - ro P ated gossip. In the same way 



bet . ia member of the United State* 
pre- ! F " 1 Administration force at Wash 



are wi/nessing 
an almost equal reconstruction at 
tho hands of war. Who hasn't 
been forced in viaw of the wrench 
ing from under his feet of the 
pro possessions of which he stood 
to fall back on that part of him 
which flourishes in spite of the 
wreck of matter and crash of 
worlds. .The old Kentucky Is gone 
never to return. Its bars will be 
buQt into cottages and its dis- 
tilleries turned into flourishing 
mills. May it b« so that Col 
Watterson's limpid lines will be 
found lilting undismayed as of 
old the story of a soul, unqueneh 
able even, by water. 



judiees will bo Wiped out bv con- ! '"?<•<>" WaB compelled to issue a 
uict in military camps. This* ind- ; J7 1 , ,lt L retraction of his charge 
maw aequaihianeesjiip wdl not j J *i ,l . P"? 3 Benedict was responsi- 
stop then. It will be continued, 



up by 



| Germany Is now reported to he get- 
ting uneasy over the entrance of Amer- 
ica Into the war. But It Is Germany's 
J own work. She decided America's at- 
|tltude a bluff, called It, and now finds 
• that the United States held the cards. 
She should play her own better If she 
wants to win. 



As far as gardens are concerned, 
the preparation mude In war for times 
,ot peace will show effects when tho 
flgliGng Is over, for by that time ev- 
erybody will know how to plant and 
care for a garden and by that much 
.the agricultural knowledge of the na- 
tion will be iucr eased. 



1 One of the German generals says 
that a peace cannot be signed until 
they have the Flanders coast, a colo- 
nial empire and a maritime basis. But 
the way tilings are K»ln>: new it looks 
as If rlie central powers. Instead of 
getting what they want, wjll have to 
take what they can get 



China's earnest Appreciation ot the 
Value of American learning and iiieth- 
Ods is illustrated by the fuel that sev- 
enty-live Chinese students, sent over 
by (hair government to acquire educa- 
tion and culture in American cqllegSI 
and universities, arrived In this rutin- 
try lately. 



reported being neiu 
House hivers ana Harbors Ldmniu 
Lee, awaiting iivotrrmauon as u) 
what lh;} people of ihe Ohio Val- 
ley are wining to consider- doing 
toward providing river terminals.. 
Criticism oi tho lack of modern 
wharf equipment lor the speedy 
unloading of vessels and ot the 
tack oi laciiities lor transfer lo. 
rail route* may be admitted, with 
a few exceptions, but it seems- 
expecting too much to ask that 
riyer towns shoula have put them 
selves to the premature expense 
ol constructing* and equipping 
river terminals when the Govern- 
ment was dragging along the im- 
provement ot the river decade 
with no immediate prospect ot" 
completion.. 

The river communities * have a 
very good answer to the commit- 
tee in that argument and in the 
other that river and rail move- 
ment has been obstructed rather 
than encouraged without # the 
Government bestirring itself to see 
that water routes were not dis- 
criminated a